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nerve killing agent

Posted by barbara grey on 9/26/02 at 21:23 (096287)

my doctor has started me on a nerve destroying agent. it's injected in to the nerve and starts to destroy it. we have tried everything except surgrey and this is working. surgrey causes scaring which in turn can bring back pain. ice is a god send! i was at the end of my rope. i had lost 60 lbs by excercise and diet. little did i know all the walking and light jogging had really set me off. some day i hope to return to my gym. the pounds are creeping up.
barbara grey,p.s. will keep you posted on this series of treatment and the correct name for this injection.

Re: nerve killing agent

BrianG on 9/26/02 at 21:41 (096290)

Interesting, are the nerves completely dead, or do they eventally grow back? Will you be able to feel any pain, heat, cold? It seems extreme, but I know what the pain can do to us! Yes, please keep us updated.

Good luck
BrianG

Re: nerve killing agent

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/27/02 at 09:55 (096334)

Barbara:
Which nerves are being injected?
Ed

Re: nerve killing agent

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/27/02 at 09:58 (096335)

Brain:

Chemical neurolysis is generally used on sensory nerves. The type c unmyelinated pain fibers (nerves with the least 'insulation') are the most subject to the effects of the chemical. A common procedure involves the use of a 4% alcohol solution. That concentration is of adequate strength tho 'deaden' the pain fibers while having little effect on the other fibers.
Ed

Re: nerve killing agent

BrianG on 9/26/02 at 21:41 (096290)

Interesting, are the nerves completely dead, or do they eventally grow back? Will you be able to feel any pain, heat, cold? It seems extreme, but I know what the pain can do to us! Yes, please keep us updated.

Good luck
BrianG

Re: nerve killing agent

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/27/02 at 09:55 (096334)

Barbara:
Which nerves are being injected?
Ed

Re: nerve killing agent

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/27/02 at 09:58 (096335)

Brain:

Chemical neurolysis is generally used on sensory nerves. The type c unmyelinated pain fibers (nerves with the least 'insulation') are the most subject to the effects of the chemical. A common procedure involves the use of a 4% alcohol solution. That concentration is of adequate strength tho 'deaden' the pain fibers while having little effect on the other fibers.
Ed