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I bought SUPERFEET insoles today...Thanks, BGCPed!

Posted by Suzanne D on 9/30/02 at 15:30 (096537)

Today began our Fall Break from school, and so I made a trip to Louisville where I found that five stores carry Superfeet inserts. None of them were listed on the internet as 'custom fit centers', so I just picked one by location. I found them to be a small but nice outdoorwear store with very helpful salespeople. (If anyone reading this is near Louisville and wants the information, I will post the store name.)

I purchased the green inserts, removed the extra insole in my SAS walking shoes, and they fit nicely. My first impression when I stepped on them in the store was that the arch support didn't feel as noticeable as the Birk inserts I am accustomed to. Also the arch seemed to be a little bit further back - nearer the heel area than what I was used to. The salesman said this was a normal reaction but was patient when I asked to try the next size. Of course it was quite a bit too long to place in my shoe (although I know I could trim it to fit.) but I stood on first one size then the next, and then I stood on one foot on my size and the other foot with the bigger size. I could tell no difference at all in the location of the arch; it felt just the same. However, the width was a little wider in the longer inserts, and I felt they didn't fit my heel as well. So I bought the ones that were 'my size'. I have worn them for 3 hours now, and they do feel 'right'.

A few minutes ago I changed back to my old inserts and insoles as I thought I had better take it slow breaking them in, but now they feel 'lumpy' and hard to me after wearing the Superfeet so I changed back! I guess I'll just put on my Birk sandals in a few minutes to take a break.

I do appreciate your advice, BGCPed, and hope that these continue to feel 'right'! I wanted to post to thank you and also let others read of my experience. With a $30.95 price tag, I think they are well worth trying.

Another plus was that the store carried a few Dansko shoes which I had read about here but never seen before. Unfortunately they did not have in stock a 42 or 43. I tried on the 44 which of course fell off my feet, but I just wanted to see what the arch area felt like. I liked the arch support and the 'rocker-type motion' when walking. Perhaps someday I'll try a pair of those.

I am also keeping in mind your recommendation of the New Balance walking shoe. For now, I'll wear the Superfeet in my SAS shoes so as not to change everything at once.

Thanks again!
Suzanne :-)

Re: I bought SUPERFEET insoles today...Thanks, BGCPed!

Carmen H on 9/30/02 at 18:18 (096545)

You can get fitted for Dankso there and order them online for almost half the price Suzanne!
:o)
Glad you had a good experience today.

Re: I bought SUPERFEET insoles today...Thanks, BGCPed!

BGCPed on 9/30/02 at 21:41 (096558)

Thanks I am glad you are doing well with them. Try to limit your break in to 1 to 2 hours first day and ad 1 hour per day. Carmen excuse my opinion but that is not cool to let a store owner fit and advise you then order online. Maybe after you buy a pair from him then order next online. Thats why I dont sell many Birks anymore since that happened to me too many times. Maybe that sounds harsh but thats why we are making specialty stores extinct

Re: BGCPed, devils advocate here

BrianG on 9/30/02 at 22:30 (096564)

Hi BGCPed,

In defense of Camen, I think it's the old Wal-Mart syndrome. It's quite possible that Carmen, or myself, could not afford the product from the specialty store. We pinch our pennies and settle for the Internet. We get what we need, in a timely manner, without paying a much higher fee. Maybe it might be good for you to look into Internet sales also, to keep up with the big guys.

I run into the same thing with my bass fishing supplies. Every year I try to buy some lures, etc. from the local guys. But, I'm on a budget, and most of my order goes to the big Internet company, for a larger discount. It's really too bad, but it's America, and it's how some people survive. If big business didn't start laying off everyone when they turned 50, there wouldn't be a need for all the big Mart's and Internet sites! It's a vicious circle.

Regards
BrianG

Re: BGCPed, devils advocate here

BGCPed on 9/30/02 at 23:18 (096569)

B I understand completly in regards to the eco-dynamics of the situation. I dont begrude anyone form saving a buck, some would call me cheap at times. My point was the comment about going to a 'good' store that will measure, fit and educate you then you go home and order via the internet for a discount. It is not the discount I have a the biggest problem with. It is when a customer spend time having you show them samples, measure them, tell them what they need etc. then the person says thanks talk to you later and orders them online or from Sams Club or similar. Another problem is that Birk will send complaining customers to my facility to get theirs fixed. Many times the player comes in late and very out of it

Many of the e stores dont have much hekp and you shoudnt buy them without trying them

Re: BGCPed, devils advocate here

BGCPed on 10/01/02 at 09:47 (096594)

Sorry about the above post lasty sentence it was supposed to be for another post and it got mixed in. What I was going to say is that when a customer calls them with a fit issue or a problem after making an online purchase Birk will give them the names of specialty stores like mine that will fix the problem. The problem is many of these people think it is a freebie since we are a dealer. It has been a problem for a while. I had an online customer bring a pair in for fitting check and had us punch new holes in all of the straps. He demanded to have it done at lunch taking cuts in line. We charged him $5 and he called us crooks.

Re: value vs. cheapness

Ed Davis, DPM on 10/01/02 at 15:04 (096613)

BG:

It just comes down to the old comparison of value vs. lowest cost.
Most who understand this comparison usually come out ahead.
Ed

Re: value vs. fixed income

BrianG on 10/01/02 at 16:42 (096625)

I can't argue with quality, but sometimes I could be looking at the exact same item. Pay retail at the local store, to help keep him in business. Or, get the steep 40% discount via the net, because I probably wouldn't have been able to afford the item at the retail cost. I do agree it must be tough to wait on someone, only to have them leave and order via the Net. It's called free enterprise, and personally I'm happy that I have a choice.

Regards
BrianG

Re: Good points all around...

Suzanne D on 10/01/02 at 16:53 (096628)

There are valid points on all sides of this issue, I believe. I grew up in a tiny town with two non-chain drug stores. My uncle owned one and took such pride in his business and relations with his customers. Many years later when I went back home for Christmas, I was warned to not mention 'Wal-Mart' around him. Yes, the big chain had come to my hometown, and he lost a lot of business. I remember how sad he was that Christmas as he sat and pondered over the fact that customers whom he had served for 20 or 30 years - and had opened up for in the middle of the night when they had emergencies - had so quickly switched to the pharmacy at the big chain. I remember his saying that he couldn't even buy diapers for what Wal-Mart sold them!

And yet, it IS free enterprise, and in America, one of our greatest freedoms is choice...And I can't blame people for trying to save money. I well remember how much medicine cost for my two daughters when they were young and it seemed sick every 3 weeks.

I respect the small, family-owned businesses and prefer to trade with them when at all possible. Given a choice which I can afford, I do. But sometimes necessity makes the cheapest place where I shop.

Good discussion!
Suzanne :-)

Re: Good points all around...

Kathy G on 10/01/02 at 17:15 (096630)

I have to get in my two cents worth on this one! I love a bargain as much as the next guy and I must admit, I own very few clothes for which I paid full price. I always shop the one-day sales, which usually last two days and use the coupons they print in the newspaper. I realize that I am supporting a chain by doing so, but at least it's a chain that still offers customer service and quality merchandise.

Here in New England, we were very slow to get Walmarts. One, unfortuanately, came into our neighboring town about eight years ago. Since that time, I've seen countless independents go out of business. I never even set foot in Walmart for a few years because I hate everything they stand for. They come and put the little guy out and pretty soon they're the only game in town and effectively have a monopoly. Soon after Walmart put the independents out, the chains started to go. There were a couple of discount chains where I would purchase whatever I could, hoping that if we all did it, we might help them to stay in business. I didn't even wait until they had a sale - which really shocked my family and friends! Alas, there's only one chain discount store left and that one is in Chapter Eleven so it probably won't last long. I've been forced to go to Walmart for things that I used to get in the stores that have gone out of business but I still go to the independents in my town when I can afford to and other stores whenever I can.

So, as Suzanne said, there are two sides to the coin. While one wants to support the independent or even the small chain, one can't always afford to or even find the merchandise there. They call it free enterprise but I fear it will soon be at the point where only a couple of giant conglomerates own everything. In many cases, like in the food industry, we're almost there. It's kind of scary and totally different from what I learned in Economics, back in the dark ages!

Note: Hope I didn't insult anyone who manages, works at or loves Walmart -
just stating an opinion! By the way, you can see how they suffered because I didn't shop there!

Re: Good points all around...

BGCPed on 10/02/02 at 06:38 (096677)

I also buy things at discounters myself. The difference is that if I do and know what I need I will walk in and pick it up. The point that irks me is when a person comes in to 'pick your brain' or flat out with no intentions to buy from you but is more than happy to waste your time then order it online, that is stealing my time. I know that Walmart will keep doing what they do and they are going to be around forever. That is why the Walton family members are some of the richest in America.

I was in no way getting on free market, just pointing out another angle to think about

Re: and around and around

Carole C in NOLA on 10/02/02 at 09:46 (096706)

BGCPed, I agree with you completely and my mother raised me to have a similar attitude. Even though the world wide web did not exist when I was young, she taught me that it was not right to have one retailer do all the work, and then to go across town and buy from a discounter.

I had three pairs of Birkenstocks that didn't fit quite right before I drove across the state to Baton Rouge and was fitted by a real expert at the Birkenstock store there last winter. It took some time to determine what size and style would work best for me, because my feet are sort of between sizes for Birkenstocks. Still, I didn't buy any at the time. After thinking about it later that night at home, I decided I had been overly frugal.

The nice thing was that they told me when I was fitted, that I could buy shoes from them by mail order too. So, I bought two pairs of Birkenstocks online from the same store that fitted me. They weren't the cheapest Birkenstocks on the internet, but I wanted to give them my business because they were the ones that did the work in fitting me correctly.

If they had not had the website and mail order set-up in place, I might have bought my shoes online from someplace else rather than drive across the state a second time. We are entering or have entered a new age of online shopping, and retailers who don't have a website with mail order option are getting the short end of the stick.

Carole

Re: Good points all around...

JudyS on 10/03/02 at 19:26 (096842)

Kathy - I'm curious, don't developers have to get permits from your town council before they can build? If that's true, then I wonder if any town council, in any community, isn't helping to put it's own independant businesses out of work by approving corporate development. I ask because in the small San Diego suburb where I live, pretty much every bit of development has to be approved by the city council.
It's a funny thing, but when I travel I always want to seek out small towns with private or family-owned business - they're much more fun and rewarding to shop in. On the other hand, I'm always happy to see a dependable WalMart when I need one too.

Re: Good points all around...

Kathy G on 10/04/02 at 08:03 (096858)

Hi Judy,

Yes, they have to go before a Planning Board before they build, not a City Council. The town into which Walmart moved is an upscale, high income town that has industrial land far away from its residential area. We have no sales or income taxes in NH and our property taxes are near the highest in the country. Because of that, towns welcome all large businesses in order to broaden their tax base. Where Walmart is located, as a matter of fact, is very close to an aquifer and there was a great deal of controversy about letting them build there. NH is not a healthy place for small, independent businesses but it's great for corporations. I consider southern NH to be one of the shopping meccas of New England. You name a store, we've probably got it. Too bad I don't like to shop!

Re: Good points all around...Kathy G

Kathy G on 10/07/02 at 09:05 (097006)

Jim,

I could go on for pages and pages as to all the reasons you're better off with either a property tax or and income tax or even both, but this isn't the proper forum! Suffice to say that NH has many very poor public schools. UNH has the highest instate tuition of any state university and we have almost no public services. We have hidden fees - like it costs much more to register a car or a boat here. Even fishing licences are higher. The county provides us with almost nothing. Most people don't even know what county they live in! There's been a battle over our tax structure since I was old enough to vote (I'm 53) and it will continue forever, as far as I can see. It's considered appropriate to 'take the pledge' against either type of tax if one wants to get elected governor. Currently, we have a candidate who is running for governor who has refused. He probably will be defeated because twice before the candidates who ran on such a platform got defeated.

I stay because my family is here and the quality of life is good if one can afford it but I feel very badly for the lower-middle class and low-income people in our state.

Enough said, this has nothing to do with orthotics!!

Re: The Above Message is for Jim C!

Kathy G on 10/07/02 at 09:12 (097008)

Sorry, I forgot to change the Subject line!

Re: The Above Message is for Jim C!

Jim C on 10/07/02 at 21:42 (097050)

Hi Kathy,

Thanks for the note. I started to write standing 'oh so tall' on my soap box, but thought better of it, just couldn't think of a way to work orthotics into it:-) Thought I would save it for another site.

Jim

Re: I bought SUPERFEET insoles today...Thanks, BGCPed!

Carmen H on 9/30/02 at 18:18 (096545)

You can get fitted for Dankso there and order them online for almost half the price Suzanne!
:o)
Glad you had a good experience today.

Re: I bought SUPERFEET insoles today...Thanks, BGCPed!

BGCPed on 9/30/02 at 21:41 (096558)

Thanks I am glad you are doing well with them. Try to limit your break in to 1 to 2 hours first day and ad 1 hour per day. Carmen excuse my opinion but that is not cool to let a store owner fit and advise you then order online. Maybe after you buy a pair from him then order next online. Thats why I dont sell many Birks anymore since that happened to me too many times. Maybe that sounds harsh but thats why we are making specialty stores extinct

Re: BGCPed, devils advocate here

BrianG on 9/30/02 at 22:30 (096564)

Hi BGCPed,

In defense of Camen, I think it's the old Wal-Mart syndrome. It's quite possible that Carmen, or myself, could not afford the product from the specialty store. We pinch our pennies and settle for the Internet. We get what we need, in a timely manner, without paying a much higher fee. Maybe it might be good for you to look into Internet sales also, to keep up with the big guys.

I run into the same thing with my bass fishing supplies. Every year I try to buy some lures, etc. from the local guys. But, I'm on a budget, and most of my order goes to the big Internet company, for a larger discount. It's really too bad, but it's America, and it's how some people survive. If big business didn't start laying off everyone when they turned 50, there wouldn't be a need for all the big Mart's and Internet sites! It's a vicious circle.

Regards
BrianG

Re: BGCPed, devils advocate here

BGCPed on 9/30/02 at 23:18 (096569)

B I understand completly in regards to the eco-dynamics of the situation. I dont begrude anyone form saving a buck, some would call me cheap at times. My point was the comment about going to a 'good' store that will measure, fit and educate you then you go home and order via the internet for a discount. It is not the discount I have a the biggest problem with. It is when a customer spend time having you show them samples, measure them, tell them what they need etc. then the person says thanks talk to you later and orders them online or from Sams Club or similar. Another problem is that Birk will send complaining customers to my facility to get theirs fixed. Many times the player comes in late and very out of it

Many of the e stores dont have much hekp and you shoudnt buy them without trying them

Re: BGCPed, devils advocate here

BGCPed on 10/01/02 at 09:47 (096594)

Sorry about the above post lasty sentence it was supposed to be for another post and it got mixed in. What I was going to say is that when a customer calls them with a fit issue or a problem after making an online purchase Birk will give them the names of specialty stores like mine that will fix the problem. The problem is many of these people think it is a freebie since we are a dealer. It has been a problem for a while. I had an online customer bring a pair in for fitting check and had us punch new holes in all of the straps. He demanded to have it done at lunch taking cuts in line. We charged him $5 and he called us crooks.

Re: value vs. cheapness

Ed Davis, DPM on 10/01/02 at 15:04 (096613)

BG:

It just comes down to the old comparison of value vs. lowest cost.
Most who understand this comparison usually come out ahead.
Ed

Re: value vs. fixed income

BrianG on 10/01/02 at 16:42 (096625)

I can't argue with quality, but sometimes I could be looking at the exact same item. Pay retail at the local store, to help keep him in business. Or, get the steep 40% discount via the net, because I probably wouldn't have been able to afford the item at the retail cost. I do agree it must be tough to wait on someone, only to have them leave and order via the Net. It's called free enterprise, and personally I'm happy that I have a choice.

Regards
BrianG

Re: Good points all around...

Suzanne D on 10/01/02 at 16:53 (096628)

There are valid points on all sides of this issue, I believe. I grew up in a tiny town with two non-chain drug stores. My uncle owned one and took such pride in his business and relations with his customers. Many years later when I went back home for Christmas, I was warned to not mention 'Wal-Mart' around him. Yes, the big chain had come to my hometown, and he lost a lot of business. I remember how sad he was that Christmas as he sat and pondered over the fact that customers whom he had served for 20 or 30 years - and had opened up for in the middle of the night when they had emergencies - had so quickly switched to the pharmacy at the big chain. I remember his saying that he couldn't even buy diapers for what Wal-Mart sold them!

And yet, it IS free enterprise, and in America, one of our greatest freedoms is choice...And I can't blame people for trying to save money. I well remember how much medicine cost for my two daughters when they were young and it seemed sick every 3 weeks.

I respect the small, family-owned businesses and prefer to trade with them when at all possible. Given a choice which I can afford, I do. But sometimes necessity makes the cheapest place where I shop.

Good discussion!
Suzanne :-)

Re: Good points all around...

Kathy G on 10/01/02 at 17:15 (096630)

I have to get in my two cents worth on this one! I love a bargain as much as the next guy and I must admit, I own very few clothes for which I paid full price. I always shop the one-day sales, which usually last two days and use the coupons they print in the newspaper. I realize that I am supporting a chain by doing so, but at least it's a chain that still offers customer service and quality merchandise.

Here in New England, we were very slow to get Walmarts. One, unfortuanately, came into our neighboring town about eight years ago. Since that time, I've seen countless independents go out of business. I never even set foot in Walmart for a few years because I hate everything they stand for. They come and put the little guy out and pretty soon they're the only game in town and effectively have a monopoly. Soon after Walmart put the independents out, the chains started to go. There were a couple of discount chains where I would purchase whatever I could, hoping that if we all did it, we might help them to stay in business. I didn't even wait until they had a sale - which really shocked my family and friends! Alas, there's only one chain discount store left and that one is in Chapter Eleven so it probably won't last long. I've been forced to go to Walmart for things that I used to get in the stores that have gone out of business but I still go to the independents in my town when I can afford to and other stores whenever I can.

So, as Suzanne said, there are two sides to the coin. While one wants to support the independent or even the small chain, one can't always afford to or even find the merchandise there. They call it free enterprise but I fear it will soon be at the point where only a couple of giant conglomerates own everything. In many cases, like in the food industry, we're almost there. It's kind of scary and totally different from what I learned in Economics, back in the dark ages!

Note: Hope I didn't insult anyone who manages, works at or loves Walmart -
just stating an opinion! By the way, you can see how they suffered because I didn't shop there!

Re: Good points all around...

BGCPed on 10/02/02 at 06:38 (096677)

I also buy things at discounters myself. The difference is that if I do and know what I need I will walk in and pick it up. The point that irks me is when a person comes in to 'pick your brain' or flat out with no intentions to buy from you but is more than happy to waste your time then order it online, that is stealing my time. I know that Walmart will keep doing what they do and they are going to be around forever. That is why the Walton family members are some of the richest in America.

I was in no way getting on free market, just pointing out another angle to think about

Re: and around and around

Carole C in NOLA on 10/02/02 at 09:46 (096706)

BGCPed, I agree with you completely and my mother raised me to have a similar attitude. Even though the world wide web did not exist when I was young, she taught me that it was not right to have one retailer do all the work, and then to go across town and buy from a discounter.

I had three pairs of Birkenstocks that didn't fit quite right before I drove across the state to Baton Rouge and was fitted by a real expert at the Birkenstock store there last winter. It took some time to determine what size and style would work best for me, because my feet are sort of between sizes for Birkenstocks. Still, I didn't buy any at the time. After thinking about it later that night at home, I decided I had been overly frugal.

The nice thing was that they told me when I was fitted, that I could buy shoes from them by mail order too. So, I bought two pairs of Birkenstocks online from the same store that fitted me. They weren't the cheapest Birkenstocks on the internet, but I wanted to give them my business because they were the ones that did the work in fitting me correctly.

If they had not had the website and mail order set-up in place, I might have bought my shoes online from someplace else rather than drive across the state a second time. We are entering or have entered a new age of online shopping, and retailers who don't have a website with mail order option are getting the short end of the stick.

Carole

Re: Good points all around...

JudyS on 10/03/02 at 19:26 (096842)

Kathy - I'm curious, don't developers have to get permits from your town council before they can build? If that's true, then I wonder if any town council, in any community, isn't helping to put it's own independant businesses out of work by approving corporate development. I ask because in the small San Diego suburb where I live, pretty much every bit of development has to be approved by the city council.
It's a funny thing, but when I travel I always want to seek out small towns with private or family-owned business - they're much more fun and rewarding to shop in. On the other hand, I'm always happy to see a dependable WalMart when I need one too.

Re: Good points all around...

Kathy G on 10/04/02 at 08:03 (096858)

Hi Judy,

Yes, they have to go before a Planning Board before they build, not a City Council. The town into which Walmart moved is an upscale, high income town that has industrial land far away from its residential area. We have no sales or income taxes in NH and our property taxes are near the highest in the country. Because of that, towns welcome all large businesses in order to broaden their tax base. Where Walmart is located, as a matter of fact, is very close to an aquifer and there was a great deal of controversy about letting them build there. NH is not a healthy place for small, independent businesses but it's great for corporations. I consider southern NH to be one of the shopping meccas of New England. You name a store, we've probably got it. Too bad I don't like to shop!

Re: Good points all around...Kathy G

Kathy G on 10/07/02 at 09:05 (097006)

Jim,

I could go on for pages and pages as to all the reasons you're better off with either a property tax or and income tax or even both, but this isn't the proper forum! Suffice to say that NH has many very poor public schools. UNH has the highest instate tuition of any state university and we have almost no public services. We have hidden fees - like it costs much more to register a car or a boat here. Even fishing licences are higher. The county provides us with almost nothing. Most people don't even know what county they live in! There's been a battle over our tax structure since I was old enough to vote (I'm 53) and it will continue forever, as far as I can see. It's considered appropriate to 'take the pledge' against either type of tax if one wants to get elected governor. Currently, we have a candidate who is running for governor who has refused. He probably will be defeated because twice before the candidates who ran on such a platform got defeated.

I stay because my family is here and the quality of life is good if one can afford it but I feel very badly for the lower-middle class and low-income people in our state.

Enough said, this has nothing to do with orthotics!!

Re: The Above Message is for Jim C!

Kathy G on 10/07/02 at 09:12 (097008)

Sorry, I forgot to change the Subject line!

Re: The Above Message is for Jim C!

Jim C on 10/07/02 at 21:42 (097050)

Hi Kathy,

Thanks for the note. I started to write standing 'oh so tall' on my soap box, but thought better of it, just couldn't think of a way to work orthotics into it:-) Thought I would save it for another site.

Jim