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Alternative to hard insoles

Posted by Bebhinn H. on 10/10/02 at 17:14 (097263)

Hi - I have been dealing with PF for years now. I have the flat footed variety of PF. I had the hard insoles from a podiatrist - they were murder. I found a sports chriropractor that measured my leg lengths and found that one of my legs is shorter than the other. My chiropractor works with Olympic atheletes. He prescribed to me orthotics that he also prescribed to these atheletes. These new orthotics had of leather uppers- the had a good stiffness as needed but an organic flexibility as well . The heel lifted needed to correct my leg length was built in as well as a soft cushion spot in one heel to help with my heel pain. These have worked much better than the old hard platstic inserts.
Langer Biomechanics Group is the company that made them.
One of my main complaints is not finding any dress shoes that they will fit in. The inserts are just too high for any dress shoes I have found and believe me I have searched quite a bit.
Any comments? Bebhinn

Re: Alternative to hard insoles

Suzanne D on 10/10/02 at 18:29 (097269)

Hello, Bebhinn! I'm really glad you have found some orthotics that are helping you.

I just wanted to mention to you that some Birkenstock shoes have removable insoles. I have a pair (Anapolis, a Mary Jane Style) in which I can successfully place my full-length Superfeet inserts. In fact, those shoes are so deep that the Superfeet insoles were not enough; I still felt I was about to walk out of the shoes, even with the straps! So I placed some removable insoles from my SAS walking shoes in first, then the Superfeet, and there is still plenty of room for my toes to wiggle around.

Perhaps you can check in a Birkenstock store if you have not already done so. Ask to see shoes with removable insoles, and perhaps your orthotics will fit in nicely!

Good luck!
Suzanne :-)

Re: Alternative to hard insoles

Suzanne D on 10/10/02 at 19:42 (097283)

Actually, I should have said removable FOOTBED rather than insole in the Birkenstock shoes. That gives you a better idea of the room you would have in the shoes for your orthotics.

Sometimes I am not sure of whether to call something an insole or footbed...

Good luck,
Suzanne :-)

Re: Alternative to hard insoles

Richard, CPed on 10/11/02 at 15:53 (097335)

Hey Beb...
I don't usually make a hard orthotic for someone with flat feet. I know that it is going to take much longer for the to get used to wearing the orthotics, and in my experience..mostly they are put on a shelf and never used again. I like to go soft with a 40 durometer EVA type material. I get great support, but it is cushioned enough so the pes planus, or flat footed person can get used to them in a decent amount of time. Decent meaning around two weeks.

One other thing I have noticed when dealing with the flat foot is the complaint that the arch seems to high..or its pushing on their foot to much. This is usually caused by forefoot varus. Basically, this means that when your foot is in a proper sub talor neutral position, the ball of the big toe is off the floor, while the ball of the little toe is on the floor. This should be posted for by adding material under the ball of the big toe to basically, bring the floor up to the foot. This will make the arch area of the orthosis feel normal.
Richard, C.Ped

Re: Alternative to hard insoles

Suzanne D on 10/10/02 at 18:29 (097269)

Hello, Bebhinn! I'm really glad you have found some orthotics that are helping you.

I just wanted to mention to you that some Birkenstock shoes have removable insoles. I have a pair (Anapolis, a Mary Jane Style) in which I can successfully place my full-length Superfeet inserts. In fact, those shoes are so deep that the Superfeet insoles were not enough; I still felt I was about to walk out of the shoes, even with the straps! So I placed some removable insoles from my SAS walking shoes in first, then the Superfeet, and there is still plenty of room for my toes to wiggle around.

Perhaps you can check in a Birkenstock store if you have not already done so. Ask to see shoes with removable insoles, and perhaps your orthotics will fit in nicely!

Good luck!
Suzanne :-)

Re: Alternative to hard insoles

Suzanne D on 10/10/02 at 19:42 (097283)

Actually, I should have said removable FOOTBED rather than insole in the Birkenstock shoes. That gives you a better idea of the room you would have in the shoes for your orthotics.

Sometimes I am not sure of whether to call something an insole or footbed...

Good luck,
Suzanne :-)

Re: Alternative to hard insoles

Richard, CPed on 10/11/02 at 15:53 (097335)

Hey Beb...
I don't usually make a hard orthotic for someone with flat feet. I know that it is going to take much longer for the to get used to wearing the orthotics, and in my experience..mostly they are put on a shelf and never used again. I like to go soft with a 40 durometer EVA type material. I get great support, but it is cushioned enough so the pes planus, or flat footed person can get used to them in a decent amount of time. Decent meaning around two weeks.

One other thing I have noticed when dealing with the flat foot is the complaint that the arch seems to high..or its pushing on their foot to much. This is usually caused by forefoot varus. Basically, this means that when your foot is in a proper sub talor neutral position, the ball of the big toe is off the floor, while the ball of the little toe is on the floor. This should be posted for by adding material under the ball of the big toe to basically, bring the floor up to the foot. This will make the arch area of the orthosis feel normal.
Richard, C.Ped