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John h - Did you go to the new doctor?

Posted by Kathy G on 10/15/02 at 08:58 (097520)

Did you like him? What did he say about the Ossatron treatments?

Just curious.

Re: John h - Did you go to the new doctor?

john h on 10/15/02 at 09:59 (097531)

Kathy: As one of the guys said on the board he is a rookie. recently out of his residency in foot and ankle surgery. very nice guy but knows a lot less about eswt than I do. his group just obtained an Ossatron and do not have much experience with it as yet. Our conversation was short and sweet and I told him I thought an eswt treatment would benefit me as it had done so in the past. he agreed. If I were going to have an Ossatron treatment I would go to Canada and Dr Gordon/Bayshore simply bedcause of their experience and cost. If our local Ossatron group were to get me covered under insurance or have a competive price I would consider them simply because it is about 10 minutes from my home. If I were going to have a Epos treatment I would head back to my buddy Dr. Z. If I were going to go the Sonoccur route I would be off to Bayshore because of their experience and cost. I am considering all these options and will at some point make a decision.

Re: John h - Did you go to the new doctor?

Kathy G on 10/17/02 at 08:57 (097721)

John,

It's depressing when you know more about a treatment or condition than the doctor, isn't it? Has your PF gotten worse or are you considering these treatments to see if you can improve your condition even more? I know that you work out regularly and I was under the impression that you were relatively pain-free. Or as pain-free as I believe anyone with PF ever gets. I think once someone has the condition, it's something that can recur at any time if they aren't vigilant.

Re: John h - Did you go to the new doctor?

john h on 10/18/02 at 10:16 (097805)

Kathy: I went for about 4-5 months with a pain level of about 1 with just an occasional flare-up. I had to be careful. In the last month or two I did some things like climb ladders on to my roof and work on a 45-30 pitch for a few hours. I also did a lot of mowing my yard which as you know is putting stress on your fascia anytime you are pushing anything using your feet and legs. I am just not willing to accept my condition as permenent even after all these years and will pursue an improvement if I think it will help. I feel that way about ESWT. The only thing I have never really given a fair try is a regular course of stretching/yoga/etc. Somewhere in my near future will be the sonnocur,epsos, or ossatron. I keep thinking at some point insurance will start covering some of these treatments but if I have to pay so be it. I do go to the club and ride a bike,lift weights,etc.

Re: mowing and roof repair with PF

Carole C in NOLA on 10/18/02 at 15:55 (097824)

Mowing is really tough on my PF and on my knees too, John, though I love it because it really gets my blood pumping! Thank goodness I have my custom orthotics fitted in heavy leather men's SAS shoes, which I wear for mowing and nothing much else. I think that helps, although I can still feel it for a couple of days after mowing and have to ice a lot.

I have to admit that if I was not almost completely healed, and if I didn't feel that the effects of mowing were gone pretty quickly, I'd hire somebody to do it. First I'd ask my doctor to prescribe no more mowing, so that I could deduct it from my income tax as a medical expense.

And John... can I give some concerned advice, as one of your heelspurs.com friends? Hope you said 'yes' because here goes. To be blunt, nobody expects a man over 45 or so to be climbing about on his roof doing repairs. Forget the PF, which in itself is reason enough not to be there. People over 50-55 start developing much more brittle bones. It's not at all smart to be climbing about on a roof now that you are over that age.

Try getting a younger friend or relative to help you with roof repairs, or hire a handyman for an afternoon. It's a lot cheaper than shelling out money for your feet, and if you were hospitalized with forty-leven broken bones that could be a whole lot more.

Carole C

Re: mowing and roof repair with PF

nancy s. on 10/18/02 at 17:30 (097832)

carole is right, john. my husband renovates houses for his work, and it has him climbing high ladders and fiddling around on rooftops sometimes. he's starting to realize he's too old to be doing this (he's 57), it's starting affect his knees, his reflexes aren't as good as they used to be -- and he's in great shape, but he's cutting back on that type of work.

of course, his dad was still climbing ladders into treetops and onto roofs at age 82, so we'll see how smart the son is in the long run!

nancy

Re: mowing and roof repair with PF

Kathy G on 10/19/02 at 09:41 (097875)

Anytime my husband gets up on the roof or even climbs a ladder to put up the wreath at Christmas or to wash windows, I have a fit. But I always have had because I'm petrified of height. When we had our roof done, I couldn't stand watching the guys up there.

That's neither here nor there. I'm glad that your PF hasn't gotten worse, John, and I hope you do eventually get to a point where you are totally pain free. I've kind of accepted that I may not get any better than I am but I am at a tolerable level with hopes that I can get back to at least taking an occasional 20 or 30 minute walk a few times a week. I had my orthotics revamped a couple of weeks ago and they now have more arch support, more cushioning and a lift for my shorter leg. I am cautiously optimistic about this new design. I did quite a bit of walking yesterday and am relatively pain-free today.

I found out that my insurance will totally cover the cost of orthotics. When I got them, the doctor told me that no one's insurance covered them and I foolishly believed him. In the thirteen unbelievably painful days that I was without the orthotics, I realized that I needed to have a second pair and I called my insurance company. Lo and behold, they'll cover the cost of them. It took the rep a great deal of time, checking with supervisors, etc. but come to find out, they consider them to be a prosthetic. So, once I've decided if I like this new design, I will get a second pair and let the insurance company pay for them. I am at a loss as to why they don't cover so many of the treatments for PF. Why don't they consider feet to be as important as say, a broken arm or leg, which requires treatment and then follow-up PT in many cases? Very strange.

Re: John h - Did you go to the new doctor?

john h on 10/15/02 at 09:59 (097531)

Kathy: As one of the guys said on the board he is a rookie. recently out of his residency in foot and ankle surgery. very nice guy but knows a lot less about eswt than I do. his group just obtained an Ossatron and do not have much experience with it as yet. Our conversation was short and sweet and I told him I thought an eswt treatment would benefit me as it had done so in the past. he agreed. If I were going to have an Ossatron treatment I would go to Canada and Dr Gordon/Bayshore simply bedcause of their experience and cost. If our local Ossatron group were to get me covered under insurance or have a competive price I would consider them simply because it is about 10 minutes from my home. If I were going to have a Epos treatment I would head back to my buddy Dr. Z. If I were going to go the Sonoccur route I would be off to Bayshore because of their experience and cost. I am considering all these options and will at some point make a decision.

Re: John h - Did you go to the new doctor?

Kathy G on 10/17/02 at 08:57 (097721)

John,

It's depressing when you know more about a treatment or condition than the doctor, isn't it? Has your PF gotten worse or are you considering these treatments to see if you can improve your condition even more? I know that you work out regularly and I was under the impression that you were relatively pain-free. Or as pain-free as I believe anyone with PF ever gets. I think once someone has the condition, it's something that can recur at any time if they aren't vigilant.

Re: John h - Did you go to the new doctor?

john h on 10/18/02 at 10:16 (097805)

Kathy: I went for about 4-5 months with a pain level of about 1 with just an occasional flare-up. I had to be careful. In the last month or two I did some things like climb ladders on to my roof and work on a 45-30 pitch for a few hours. I also did a lot of mowing my yard which as you know is putting stress on your fascia anytime you are pushing anything using your feet and legs. I am just not willing to accept my condition as permenent even after all these years and will pursue an improvement if I think it will help. I feel that way about ESWT. The only thing I have never really given a fair try is a regular course of stretching/yoga/etc. Somewhere in my near future will be the sonnocur,epsos, or ossatron. I keep thinking at some point insurance will start covering some of these treatments but if I have to pay so be it. I do go to the club and ride a bike,lift weights,etc.

Re: mowing and roof repair with PF

Carole C in NOLA on 10/18/02 at 15:55 (097824)

Mowing is really tough on my PF and on my knees too, John, though I love it because it really gets my blood pumping! Thank goodness I have my custom orthotics fitted in heavy leather men's SAS shoes, which I wear for mowing and nothing much else. I think that helps, although I can still feel it for a couple of days after mowing and have to ice a lot.

I have to admit that if I was not almost completely healed, and if I didn't feel that the effects of mowing were gone pretty quickly, I'd hire somebody to do it. First I'd ask my doctor to prescribe no more mowing, so that I could deduct it from my income tax as a medical expense.

And John... can I give some concerned advice, as one of your heelspurs.com friends? Hope you said 'yes' because here goes. To be blunt, nobody expects a man over 45 or so to be climbing about on his roof doing repairs. Forget the PF, which in itself is reason enough not to be there. People over 50-55 start developing much more brittle bones. It's not at all smart to be climbing about on a roof now that you are over that age.

Try getting a younger friend or relative to help you with roof repairs, or hire a handyman for an afternoon. It's a lot cheaper than shelling out money for your feet, and if you were hospitalized with forty-leven broken bones that could be a whole lot more.

Carole C

Re: mowing and roof repair with PF

nancy s. on 10/18/02 at 17:30 (097832)

carole is right, john. my husband renovates houses for his work, and it has him climbing high ladders and fiddling around on rooftops sometimes. he's starting to realize he's too old to be doing this (he's 57), it's starting affect his knees, his reflexes aren't as good as they used to be -- and he's in great shape, but he's cutting back on that type of work.

of course, his dad was still climbing ladders into treetops and onto roofs at age 82, so we'll see how smart the son is in the long run!

nancy

Re: mowing and roof repair with PF

Kathy G on 10/19/02 at 09:41 (097875)

Anytime my husband gets up on the roof or even climbs a ladder to put up the wreath at Christmas or to wash windows, I have a fit. But I always have had because I'm petrified of height. When we had our roof done, I couldn't stand watching the guys up there.

That's neither here nor there. I'm glad that your PF hasn't gotten worse, John, and I hope you do eventually get to a point where you are totally pain free. I've kind of accepted that I may not get any better than I am but I am at a tolerable level with hopes that I can get back to at least taking an occasional 20 or 30 minute walk a few times a week. I had my orthotics revamped a couple of weeks ago and they now have more arch support, more cushioning and a lift for my shorter leg. I am cautiously optimistic about this new design. I did quite a bit of walking yesterday and am relatively pain-free today.

I found out that my insurance will totally cover the cost of orthotics. When I got them, the doctor told me that no one's insurance covered them and I foolishly believed him. In the thirteen unbelievably painful days that I was without the orthotics, I realized that I needed to have a second pair and I called my insurance company. Lo and behold, they'll cover the cost of them. It took the rep a great deal of time, checking with supervisors, etc. but come to find out, they consider them to be a prosthetic. So, once I've decided if I like this new design, I will get a second pair and let the insurance company pay for them. I am at a loss as to why they don't cover so many of the treatments for PF. Why don't they consider feet to be as important as say, a broken arm or leg, which requires treatment and then follow-up PT in many cases? Very strange.