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Moon Pies

Posted by Carole C in NOLA on 10/20/02 at 15:55 (097975)

Nancy, if you've never heard of a Moon Pie then I just don't know what to say. They are this round flat chocolate covered nutritional nightmare that we have down here and they give you a sugar high to beat the band. I guess you just can't be a true Southerner unless you are crazy about them! You'll just have to be a (shudder) Northerner until you manage to find one and eat it, probably on some trip down South. (By the way, that's pronounced 'NOH-thun-nuh' in the deep deep South).

You will have to practice saying, 'AH EM UH NOH-thun-nuh' until you have consumed enough Moon Pies and RC to fix that little problem. You'll know when you start whistling Dixie. Eating moon pies is best done while sitting on the curb at a delapidated gas station or diner somewhere in nowheresville in the dead of summer. Personally I think Dr. Pepper is a good substitute for RC, with Moon Pies (but then it's been said that I lived in Texas too long).

Rumor has it that moon pies were brought down here by carpetbaggers to sap the intellectual and physical strength of the South, due to sugar poisoning, after the Civil War. This way the carpetbaggers could run rampant over our economy. After most Southerners became addicted to moon pies, they just lay around with big smiles on their faces and never did do too much of anything energetic. Eat one and tell us what you think. :)

Carole C (with a grin)

Re: Moon Pies

wendyn on 10/20/02 at 15:59 (097977)

Carole, perhaps I live so far north that it explains why I understood next to NOTHING in this post!

Re: Moon Pies-ahhh yes... the staple food of the south

carmen h on 10/20/02 at 16:22 (097979)

Best if heated til slightly warm and eaten on a hot summer morning on a ride to the farm as you wave to the old folks on their porches or passing the horse and buggy Minnonites on their way to church.
2 for $.50 here at the local grocery and even comes in orange for Halloween.
Best thing to hit the south...just ask my husband.
I understood every word Carole...and I originated in Minnesota!
True proof that ANYone can become a southerner!
;o)
Enjoyed your post...hysterical!

Re: Moon Pies

Laurie R on 10/20/02 at 22:24 (097993)

I'm with you Wendy , I have never ever heard of moon pie .... I did not understand what it is either. Maybe you can send us some .......Laurie R

Re: Moon Pies

Richard, C.Ped on 10/21/02 at 08:36 (098013)

Here I am trying to lose the 'sympathy weight' I put on when my wife was pregnant, and you guys are talking about Moon Pies. Chocolate or Vanilla...I love those things! Grrrr.. LOL!!!!
Richard, C.Ped

Re: Moon Pies

john h on 10/21/02 at 09:37 (098020)

Carole: You have it dead on. Eating a moon pie in a wooden chair in front of a run down gas station more than likely on a dirt road with an RC cola out of the cooler box on outside front porch of the gas station. Ideally the temperature is in the upper 90's and the gas station also sells big ole worms for fishing. Most of the people in and around the station wear overalls and drive an ole pickup. They probably also sell cane poles.

Re: Moon Pies

john h on 10/21/02 at 09:38 (098021)

sort of like we do not understand 1000 mile dog sled races across the frozen tundra Wendy. Mush! Mush!

Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/21/02 at 18:17 (098041)

I was going to mention the overalls and the old pickup too, but I didn't think anyone would believe me. LOL You and I have probably crossed paths somewhere along the road.

When I lived in rural Mississippi, there was a small old grocery store down the road that advertised it sold not only motor oil but also 'fried chicken and worms'. I presume they meant 'fried chicken, and worms'. :)

Carole C

Re: Moon Pies

Necee on 10/21/02 at 21:39 (098052)

Carole, I loved reading your post! Your discription sounds just like the old gas station in the little town where my mom grew up, Blooming Grove Texas population 600. My brother and I would buy a moon pie, and go sit outside enjoying our treat while listening to the locals tell stories and talk about the weather. And by the way, don't forget the watermelon, and spittin' seeds. What would summertime in the south be without watermelon!

Happy trails....

Necee

Re: John

wendyn on 10/21/02 at 22:53 (098061)

Very funny John. I have never seen a dog sled race, and I don't live on the frozen tundra either. Close, but not quite.

Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/21/02 at 23:23 (098064)

Yes! I had forgotten about spitting watermelon seeds. And don't forget the mosquitos and crickets, either! I think slapping at mosquitos is part of the experience of eating moon pies. Porch swings and crickets at dusk when it's starting to cool off a little outside, are part of the pre-airconditioning summers in the South that I remember, too.

I really like the memory of the old outdoor chest coolers for sodas that John described. I had forgotten all about those, and I'd only been thinking of the 5 cent glass fronted vending machine for sodas outside of that gas station.

Carole C

Re: Moon Pies

nancy s. on 10/22/02 at 07:30 (098071)

this whole moon pie thread has my head hitting the walls on two sides with laughter (i type in a tiny alcove--maybe i'd finally better move on out of here). your original descriptive post is hilarious, carole. i'm SO glad i asked!

i like laurie's suggestion and hope you follow up on it in your spare time, Really Soon: send us noh-then-uhs a moon pie so we can experience the joy and disgust too. if you don't, i'll have to wait till we drive to mexico again, and that may be a while. not enough gas in the tank, you know.

thanks in advance.
nancy

Re: To Nancy**Re: Moon pies

Necee on 10/22/02 at 08:01 (098073)

Ok Nancy you asked for it.......I'll send you a moon pie, you have my email address, so if you don't mind giving me your mailing address I'll sure give you, 'the moon'. To be completely honest with you.....I'm not all that crazy about moon pies, but give me a slice of sweet tater pie and I'm in 'hog heaven'! In case you've never heard that sayin' before, it's another suth-urn thang.

Happy trails....

Necee

Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/22/02 at 08:05 (098074)

Nancy, I don't eat the darn things any more... haven't had a moon pie (or a Twinkie) since I was a kid or young teen. Too much sugar and too fattening for someone like me. (Or so I thought... but I do eat Slimfast bars which might be just as bad). I drink only diet sodas these days, too.

When you go to Mexico the next time, you might want to get a moon pie in some Southern state along the way, in order to further your American cultural education. :)

Actually, I don't even know if they sell them any more. I try not to look!

Carole C

Re: Moon Pies

Kathy G on 10/22/02 at 19:51 (098104)

Haven't been on in a couple of days but love the discussion of Moon Pies. As a true Noh-thun-Ah, I wonder if these are similar to Whoopie Pies that we have here in New England. Anyone know? Maybe Nancy S? That's so funny, Carole, because I came originally from Massachusetts and have a real accent, not like my husband and kids who have always lived in southern NH. When I say Northerner, I say, Nohtanah, without the southern accent on the first syllable. My family loves to ride me about it but after all these years, I don't seem likely to lose the accent. Sometimes, if I don't think about it, I'll say something about a hoss (meaning horse) and they just roll in laughter. (Yes, that laahhfta.) You and I would love hearing each other talk, I'll bet! By the way, we used to have watermelon seed spitting contests here, too. Of course, they were wotahmelons!

Thanks for your description of life in the south. It made my day on a day that has been a bit depressing because of the news!

Re: Moon Pies

nancy s. on 10/22/02 at 20:07 (098105)

oh ... whoopie pies. do you like them, kathy? i think they're gross! i wished i didn't think so when we bought our first house, in maine in 1991, and one of the neighbors left a huge box of fresh whoopie pies on our stoop which she'd made just for us as a welcome. i thanked her profusely and said they were delicious, but to be honest i sent them to work with my husband. i always felt kind of bad about that.

necee, is a moon pie anything like a whoopie pie? if so, i will forgo your kind offer! a whoopie pie seems to be made with two dark mushy cookies lathered with creamy soft mushy white sugary stuff in between. i've never made any, only found them on the stoop, so i'm no expert.

hey, i'm just getting this nifty new way to respond to posts in a little box, without losing the 'view all' list. this is a first in three years! thanks, scott,

nancy

Re: Moon Pies

Nancy N on 10/22/02 at 21:35 (098111)

Nancy--

For some reason, Moon Pies were readily available at the drugstore in the small town where I went to college (in Northern Central PA, which is hardly the deep south), and since I am also from PA Dutch country, I can help you with the moon pie vs. whoopie pie question.

A moon pie is similar, but not in any way identical. The outer layers are more like cookies than cake (which is the way whoopie pies are made where I come from--maybe they're different in Maine?), and the filling is marshmallow. Then the whole thing is covered in chocolate (the drugstore also had some that were yellow, I don't remember what that coating was). So it's a relative of the whoopie pie, but not the same. A moon pie is chewier, for one thing. I don't know if I'm being terribly clear here, but maybe one of our Suh-thun-uhs can help clarify if I'm not?

If you don't like whoopie pies, I'm not sure if you'd like a moon pie. They're different enough that you might. But it might be worth having a look at it just so you can say you know what they are! :)

Re: Moon Pies

linda on 10/22/02 at 22:26 (098115)

i just read this thread about the moon pies . it was my father's favorite junk food . i buy a box of moon pies on his birthday and the anniversary of his death , then my sister and myself eat a couple of pies until we get sick off the sugar . i wash it down with diet BIG RED ( another RC cola product ) . there is another product on the shelf at Krogers that is similiar to the moon pie , however i cannot think of the name . linda

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Necee on 10/22/02 at 22:59 (098117)

Well Nancy, if you don't like whoopie pies then it's a sure bet you wont like moon pies, they are quite similiar. Moon pies are round, the thin cakelike outer layers are covered with chocolate, and the center is marshmallow. Let me know if that sounds appetizing.

Happy trails......
Necee

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 05:28 (098126)

You really think whoopie pies and moon pies are that similar? I don't think they're close enough to make not liking one a sure bet that you won't like the other, but maybe that's just me...

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 08:21 (098130)

oh gosh, you all have me confused now. nancy n, your description was very full, thank you. and linda, sounds like a nice tradition you and your sis have.

i guess i won't really know until i try a real moon pie, so necee, i'm going to email you with my address! after i receive and eat the moon pie, i'll report the very important findings right here on the social/support board -- if i'm still alive.

nancy

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Kathy G on 10/23/02 at 10:58 (098140)

My gosh, we have discussions on such meaningful subjects, don't we? Well, in answer to your question, Nancy S., I had a whoopie pie once when I was a kid. I can't even remember where or when but in my mind, it was just delicious. My son's preschool sold cookbooks and there was a recipe for them. I hadn't thought of them in years and decided to try them. I vaguely remember that the filling had a ton of shortening in it and I wasn't sure it was such a healthy thing but figured I'd splurge. Remember, this was many years ago and we were just becoming aware of the dangers of fats, etc. Well, I made them and they were a lot of work and absolutely disgusting! We each had one; actually, I think my husband only ate a couple of bites of one and no one liked them. I ended up throwing them away and I've never had one since!

It's so funny; I saw in one of Carole's posts that they weren't allowed to have things like Hostess Cupcakes in her house. My mother must have had mixed ideas. We never had Coke or any soft drinks, never had potato chips, seldom had candy, but I was allowed one package of Hostess Cupcakes for my lunch each day. Isn't that funny? I was a finicky eater so maybe that was something she knew I'd eat. Anyway, I don't think either of my kids have ever had Hostess Cupcakes or Twinkies. I know for sure that my son hasn't ever eaten a Whoopie Pie because he's one of those weird creatures who doesn't like chocolate! I think my daughter bought one at a church fair when she was little and she ended up throwing it out. So, I guess I wouldn't be big into Moon Pies either. But I just love hearing about these things that I didn't even know existed. And like you talk about RC cola. That hardly sells around here and never has. I'm not even sure it's still available. Funny how regional tastes are so different.

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 11:37 (098142)

I sure thought that whoopie pies were a PA Dutch concoction (especially since an article in the Washington Post a few weeks ago included a description of them for the uninitiated). I grew up in Central PA and probably have had several things that would surprise or even disgust peeople from other parts of the country. That said, there are plenty of PA Dutch foods that I won't touch--scrapple is one of them. Hogmaw would be another. I'll still go for chicken pot pie, though (and not the stuff that's baked in a crust, either--REAL pot pie as God intended it), Lebanon bologna, etc...

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 11:42 (098144)

I'm not sure but I think RC went out of business. (?) At least, I haven't seen any lately. In recent years I just drink innocuous things like Diet 7-Up or Diet Dr. Pepper, anyway.

Carole C

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

linda on 10/23/02 at 12:16 (098148)

carole---RC has a plant right close to my home about 3mi away . now i don't drink RC cola but i do drink the Big RED the other RC product . have you ever tried that sweet drink ? this has been a great conversation piece carole . i have been down in the dumps and this has cheered me up . i was glad that i clicked on line yesterday . linda

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 12:33 (098150)

oooo, i don't know, nancy, that real pot pie doesn't sound as good as the fake stuff, even if god did intend it. (do we know this for sure?)

so how different is PA dutch from dutch dutch? my husband grew up in holland, michigan, and his folks and all these other relatives came over here from the old country. when we finally got married, i was given by a purebred dutch person from holland a cookbook full of recipes for food that sounds an awful lot like those names you just threw out here. i think i put the book in my shop for sale. i never cooked any of them, and not much else for that matter.

it would make sense to me if whoopie pies came from the dutch, but i'm no expert. obviously!

nancy

Re: To Carole and Nancy S.

Necee on 10/23/02 at 12:48 (098152)

RC cola is alive and well in Texas, it's a lot like Pepsi, and a very popular soda here, besides.......after eating that disgusting moon pie, you have to have something to wash it down with!!! Get ready Nancy S. your moon pie is own its way!!!!! Enjoy!!

Happy trails.......
Necee

Re: To Carole and Nancy S.

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 14:18 (098161)

I remember RC cola quite well, mostly from my youth. Later, RC was the only cola offered at the Arby's on Southwest Parkway in College Station, Texas, when I lived there. But in the mid 1990's, they switched to another cola. That's why I thought that RC cola might not be available any more.

Glad to hear that it's still out there. :)

Carole C

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 14:20 (098162)

Linda, thanks for the tip! :) If I should ever magically become slim, maybe I'll drink Big Red again. Right now, I don't drink non-diet sodas because of the sugar.

Actually, I drink more water than anything. We have really GREAT water here in Metairie, Louisiana. Wouldn't go well with a moon pie, though. :)

Carole

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 14:23 (098163)

I love scrapple. My mother used to fry it quite frequently when we were children. She wasn't Pennsylvania Dutch, or from anywhere near Pennsylvania, so I don't know what gave her the inspiration to make scrapple so much. I haven't had it since childhood.

I have never heard of Hogmaw or Lebanon bologna.

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 14:28 (098165)

oh dear. now i must ask.

what is scrapple?

Re: To Carole and Nancy S.

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 14:33 (098166)

oh wow! thanks, necee baby! i hope you're not sending RC cola with it. i do remember that from my youth (vaguely), but now i drink only water, decaf coffee, or wine. feel free to include a bottle of j lohr chardonnay.
nancy

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 15:55 (098171)

It's sort of a fried potato pancake, if my memory serves me correctly. Bear in mind that I haven't had it since the 1950's. :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 16:07 (098173)

did you say potato? my favorite food? could you send me one of those fried potato pancakes? i would like food coming in from all over the country ... no, all over the world. then i could stop worrying over my noncookness.

really, that scrapple sounds great to me.

nancy

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 16:31 (098175)

It really is. I'm fishing back into my hazy memories from 50 years ago, here, but I think she used to fry it with sausage and eggs at breakfast sometimes. I seem to recall it tasting a little like sausage anyway. Maybe it had a lot of other ingredients... potato pancake is my best guess but what does a kid know about what's in the food she eats? LOL

I have no idea of how to cook them, nor have I seen any since that time. You wouldn't want one in the mail, anyway, because it would become a cold mess by the time you got it. :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 16:34 (098176)

No, it's not a potato pancake. Not even close. If it were a potato pancake, I'd eat it.

I found the following description at a site called 'la casa de scrapple.' Read it only if you really want to know, it's not pleasant (as it's composed largely of miscellaneous pig parts)...

'First, a few more words for the uninitiated... Scrapple is a processed meat product composed of cuts and pieces of meat which -- for one reason or another -- will not make meals in themselves. The bulk of these come to us courtesy of the face, head, and chest cavity of the common hog.

'Scrapple should never be confused with Spam. A product of the Hormel Foods Corporation, Spam is spiced ham in a can - ham being the upper portion of a pig's hind leg. Scrapple, on the other hand, is an amalgamation of tendons, cartilage, feet, skin, ears, nose, gums and more. In short, it's all the garbage that should be thrown away. Some people eat it. Really.'

Aren't you glad you asked?

Hog Maw is a stuffed pig's stomach (what can I saw, pigs are popular food for the PA Dutch). I imagine it's somewhat similar to haggis, but I won't eat that, either, so I couldn't tell you. It's full of stuff like sausage, potatoes, and onions, which don't sound so bad to me bu I'm not going anywhere near the pig's stomach, thankyouverymuch.

Lebanon bologna is bologna that's spicier than regular bologna. Oscar Meyer is positively bland by comparison. I've been craving the stuff for a few weeks (which is interesting all on its own!) so it's a good thing I'll be able to get some this weekend.

That's it for me and the Dutchie foods--for now!

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 16:39 (098177)

OOPS! You are SO right.

GMTA (Great Minds Think Alike). I was off looking for a link too. Here's the one that I found.

http://www.mememap.org/scrapple.html

You are right! It's got cornmeal, not potatos, but I was right about the sausage taste. (grin)

I think I'll avoid Hog Maw, but Lebanon bologna sounds pretty good. :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 16:41 (098178)

Nancy--

PA Dutch isn't at all like Dutch Dutch--largely because PA Dutch is a misnomer. PA German is more accurate. I have ancestors who are German and some who are Swiss German. So any similarity to actual Dutch food is purely coincidental.

I have no problem with PA Dutch desserts (aside from the fact that they're TOO good and will sit in your stomach for hours, if not days!). Whoopie pies, shoo-fly pies, sugar cakes, apple dumplings... they all work for me. It's some of the meat dishes that gross me out (see my post on scrapple and hog maw below!). And I will swear till the day I die that you haven't really had chicken pot pie unless you've had the boiled variety, which is the real thing--no actual 'pie' involved. My grandmother makes that every year after Thanksgiving and Christmas, with the leftover turkey, broth, and turkey gravy. She throws in potatoes, celery and carrots, and bowtie pasta, seasons it, and I think that's about it. I remember making ham pot pie with my great-grandmother when I was a kid, and cutting the noodles to go into it. I am not a big fan of ham, but I have to admit that I think my great-grandmother's ham pot pie was even better than the chicken/turkey pot pie. Don't knock it till you've tried it!!!

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 16:43 (098179)

Well, I got a laugh out of the idea of scrapple being a potato pancake, I have to admit. I'll have to share that with my grandmother when I talk to her next. I can understand how you'd only remember the sausage flavor, though!! (Now, my grandmother would eat scrapple and hog maw and think nothing of it. I'd probably eat the hog maw filling as long as it never saw the inside of a pig's stomach. Ick.)

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 16:57 (098180)

Maybe my 'little girl palate' just thought it was good so it must be potatos. :)

I don't think I'd eat the hog maw even to be polite, unless I didn't know what it was. You are brave!!! :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 17:04 (098181)

Oh no, I'm not saying I'd eat it to be polite!! I meant that I'd eat the filling, if it was prepared on its own and never ever ever saw the inside of anybody's stomach but mine!!

Ain't no chance I'm THAT brave!! :)

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 18:10 (098184)

OH! OK, I thought you meant you'd scoop out the filling and eat it. LOL

And here I thought you were a veritable culinary Daniel Boone, bravely exploring the world of stuffed animal stomachs! :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

Julie on 10/24/02 at 03:05 (098201)

Time I contributed from across the pond. Do you all know about haggis? It's a favourite in Scotland: a sheep's stomach, stuffed with grain and offal and boiled till done. It's delicious. Eaten with 'neeps and nips' (mashed turnips and whiskey, preferably malt).

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/24/02 at 05:57 (098203)

Julie--

I have heard of haggis, to be sure, but you won't catch me anywhere near it. I think it's probably somewhat similar to hogmaw, but perhaps only because they're both stuffed stomachs. That's where my problem is--just not into the whole 'stuffed stomach' thing unless it's mine, and even then it's not always a good thing!! ;)

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/24/02 at 07:38 (098208)

what a lot of 'parts' were being tossed out here as i innocently slept! you've all convinced me to avoid all of it (except maybe that real pot pie, nancy).

i'll put it all out of my mind now and wait for necee's whoopie pie, which i promise to give a full review of here on the board.

nancy
p.s. I saw haggis at dinner at a scottish inn here in maine about twenty years ago. i didn't taste it. it looked like, well, garbage, and this was one fancy place.

Re: Regional foods

Julie on 10/24/02 at 08:32 (098215)

Don't be misled by haggis's appearance, Nancy. It's a dish fit for the gods.

Re: Regional foods

Kathy G on 10/24/02 at 14:25 (098251)

Julie,

I've heard of haggis but I probably wouldn't eat it intentionally. I might even like it if someone gave it to me and didn't tell me, until afterward, what it was! Which reminds me of one of the biggest faux pas of my youth. I was about 22 and we were invited to a dinner party at the home of my very wealthy, sophisticated boss. We were served curry with something through it or maybe it was on top of it, I don't really remember. What I do remember is that we were just starting to eat when he remarked that we were eating quail eggs. Being a sophisticated woman of the world, I blurted, 'Oh, I wish you hadn't told us before we ate it!' Of course, as soon as the word were out, I nearly died. The wife of one of the other firm partners rescued me by saying, 'That's all right, Kathy. You just say what everyone else is thinking!' All these years later, I now know that quail eggs aren't that unusual but to a young, inexperienced connosieur of food, it sounded strange indeed.

My mother used to make delicious Irish potato pancakes she called Boxtie. And she also made German potato pancakes. I know the Irish version was made from grated raw potatoes and I'm pretty sure the German ones were made from mashed potatoes. I haven't thought of them in years. They were so good! So many of her recipes were never written down. Some I can make from memory but I'm trying to measure and write down the ingredients in case either of my children ever want to make them. My son and daughter both like to cook.

Carole, I'm really glad you started this whole discussion! Thanks to everyone for making it so much fun!

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/24/02 at 14:38 (098253)

kathy, i know how you feel making a faux pas like that at someone's hoity-toity dinner table. (it was nice you had rescuers.)

i once was taken by my upwardly mobile boyfriend to the home of some extremely fancy friends of his, for dinner, just the four of us. what a layout, fancy china and crystal and silver, etc. etc. She put the food on the table, and we all passed it around very elegantly, and then i took a bite of the fowl on my plate.

'Wow!' i cried. 'This is the BEST chicken i EVER tasted!'

dead silence. then my boyfriend mumbled to me, 'it's capon.'

i had to look the word up in the dictionary when we got home, but in the meantime i wanted to crawl under the table. thank god we broke up and i never had to go back there again. i also stayed away from upwardly mobile boyfriends after that. phil and i ain't rich, but we love our life -- although it'd be nice to be able to afford health insurance!

nancy

Re: Regional foods

Kathy G on 10/24/02 at 15:08 (098259)

Nancy,

I know, we uncouth people may not know much about them manners but we're happy, by golly! I'm probably most happy with a pizza from Uno's or a meal from the local Italian restaurant! I learned a great deal from those folks. For example, the house was an enormous mansion and what I most remember about it was that it was cold and dark. And that all the Orientals were really, really worn. (Maybe that's what they mean by 'old' money.) And, like you, I was perfectly happy with my station in life. And yes, I can't believe we actually live in a time when health insurance is not a given but something that so many have to live without or, in order to have it, must sacrifice some of life's other essentials. It's a disgrace.

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/24/02 at 16:49 (098275)

I'll have to take your word for it, at least for now, Julie. If I were ever to be brave enough to try it, I'd want the real deal, cooked over on your side of the pond. You can get canned haggis here (if you know where to look), but that's about the only thing that sounds worse than the regular version to me! :)

Re: Canned haggis...

Julie on 10/25/02 at 02:05 (098317)

....sounds like a very, very bad idea.

Re: Moon Pies

wendyn on 10/20/02 at 15:59 (097977)

Carole, perhaps I live so far north that it explains why I understood next to NOTHING in this post!

Re: Moon Pies-ahhh yes... the staple food of the south

carmen h on 10/20/02 at 16:22 (097979)

Best if heated til slightly warm and eaten on a hot summer morning on a ride to the farm as you wave to the old folks on their porches or passing the horse and buggy Minnonites on their way to church.
2 for $.50 here at the local grocery and even comes in orange for Halloween.
Best thing to hit the south...just ask my husband.
I understood every word Carole...and I originated in Minnesota!
True proof that ANYone can become a southerner!
;o)
Enjoyed your post...hysterical!

Re: Moon Pies

Laurie R on 10/20/02 at 22:24 (097993)

I'm with you Wendy , I have never ever heard of moon pie .... I did not understand what it is either. Maybe you can send us some .......Laurie R

Re: Moon Pies

Richard, C.Ped on 10/21/02 at 08:36 (098013)

Here I am trying to lose the 'sympathy weight' I put on when my wife was pregnant, and you guys are talking about Moon Pies. Chocolate or Vanilla...I love those things! Grrrr.. LOL!!!!
Richard, C.Ped

Re: Moon Pies

john h on 10/21/02 at 09:37 (098020)

Carole: You have it dead on. Eating a moon pie in a wooden chair in front of a run down gas station more than likely on a dirt road with an RC cola out of the cooler box on outside front porch of the gas station. Ideally the temperature is in the upper 90's and the gas station also sells big ole worms for fishing. Most of the people in and around the station wear overalls and drive an ole pickup. They probably also sell cane poles.

Re: Moon Pies

john h on 10/21/02 at 09:38 (098021)

sort of like we do not understand 1000 mile dog sled races across the frozen tundra Wendy. Mush! Mush!

Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/21/02 at 18:17 (098041)

I was going to mention the overalls and the old pickup too, but I didn't think anyone would believe me. LOL You and I have probably crossed paths somewhere along the road.

When I lived in rural Mississippi, there was a small old grocery store down the road that advertised it sold not only motor oil but also 'fried chicken and worms'. I presume they meant 'fried chicken, and worms'. :)

Carole C

Re: Moon Pies

Necee on 10/21/02 at 21:39 (098052)

Carole, I loved reading your post! Your discription sounds just like the old gas station in the little town where my mom grew up, Blooming Grove Texas population 600. My brother and I would buy a moon pie, and go sit outside enjoying our treat while listening to the locals tell stories and talk about the weather. And by the way, don't forget the watermelon, and spittin' seeds. What would summertime in the south be without watermelon!

Happy trails....

Necee

Re: John

wendyn on 10/21/02 at 22:53 (098061)

Very funny John. I have never seen a dog sled race, and I don't live on the frozen tundra either. Close, but not quite.

Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/21/02 at 23:23 (098064)

Yes! I had forgotten about spitting watermelon seeds. And don't forget the mosquitos and crickets, either! I think slapping at mosquitos is part of the experience of eating moon pies. Porch swings and crickets at dusk when it's starting to cool off a little outside, are part of the pre-airconditioning summers in the South that I remember, too.

I really like the memory of the old outdoor chest coolers for sodas that John described. I had forgotten all about those, and I'd only been thinking of the 5 cent glass fronted vending machine for sodas outside of that gas station.

Carole C

Re: Moon Pies

nancy s. on 10/22/02 at 07:30 (098071)

this whole moon pie thread has my head hitting the walls on two sides with laughter (i type in a tiny alcove--maybe i'd finally better move on out of here). your original descriptive post is hilarious, carole. i'm SO glad i asked!

i like laurie's suggestion and hope you follow up on it in your spare time, Really Soon: send us noh-then-uhs a moon pie so we can experience the joy and disgust too. if you don't, i'll have to wait till we drive to mexico again, and that may be a while. not enough gas in the tank, you know.

thanks in advance.
nancy

Re: To Nancy**Re: Moon pies

Necee on 10/22/02 at 08:01 (098073)

Ok Nancy you asked for it.......I'll send you a moon pie, you have my email address, so if you don't mind giving me your mailing address I'll sure give you, 'the moon'. To be completely honest with you.....I'm not all that crazy about moon pies, but give me a slice of sweet tater pie and I'm in 'hog heaven'! In case you've never heard that sayin' before, it's another suth-urn thang.

Happy trails....

Necee

Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/22/02 at 08:05 (098074)

Nancy, I don't eat the darn things any more... haven't had a moon pie (or a Twinkie) since I was a kid or young teen. Too much sugar and too fattening for someone like me. (Or so I thought... but I do eat Slimfast bars which might be just as bad). I drink only diet sodas these days, too.

When you go to Mexico the next time, you might want to get a moon pie in some Southern state along the way, in order to further your American cultural education. :)

Actually, I don't even know if they sell them any more. I try not to look!

Carole C

Re: Moon Pies

Kathy G on 10/22/02 at 19:51 (098104)

Haven't been on in a couple of days but love the discussion of Moon Pies. As a true Noh-thun-Ah, I wonder if these are similar to Whoopie Pies that we have here in New England. Anyone know? Maybe Nancy S? That's so funny, Carole, because I came originally from Massachusetts and have a real accent, not like my husband and kids who have always lived in southern NH. When I say Northerner, I say, Nohtanah, without the southern accent on the first syllable. My family loves to ride me about it but after all these years, I don't seem likely to lose the accent. Sometimes, if I don't think about it, I'll say something about a hoss (meaning horse) and they just roll in laughter. (Yes, that laahhfta.) You and I would love hearing each other talk, I'll bet! By the way, we used to have watermelon seed spitting contests here, too. Of course, they were wotahmelons!

Thanks for your description of life in the south. It made my day on a day that has been a bit depressing because of the news!

Re: Moon Pies

nancy s. on 10/22/02 at 20:07 (098105)

oh ... whoopie pies. do you like them, kathy? i think they're gross! i wished i didn't think so when we bought our first house, in maine in 1991, and one of the neighbors left a huge box of fresh whoopie pies on our stoop which she'd made just for us as a welcome. i thanked her profusely and said they were delicious, but to be honest i sent them to work with my husband. i always felt kind of bad about that.

necee, is a moon pie anything like a whoopie pie? if so, i will forgo your kind offer! a whoopie pie seems to be made with two dark mushy cookies lathered with creamy soft mushy white sugary stuff in between. i've never made any, only found them on the stoop, so i'm no expert.

hey, i'm just getting this nifty new way to respond to posts in a little box, without losing the 'view all' list. this is a first in three years! thanks, scott,

nancy

Re: Moon Pies

Nancy N on 10/22/02 at 21:35 (098111)

Nancy--

For some reason, Moon Pies were readily available at the drugstore in the small town where I went to college (in Northern Central PA, which is hardly the deep south), and since I am also from PA Dutch country, I can help you with the moon pie vs. whoopie pie question.

A moon pie is similar, but not in any way identical. The outer layers are more like cookies than cake (which is the way whoopie pies are made where I come from--maybe they're different in Maine?), and the filling is marshmallow. Then the whole thing is covered in chocolate (the drugstore also had some that were yellow, I don't remember what that coating was). So it's a relative of the whoopie pie, but not the same. A moon pie is chewier, for one thing. I don't know if I'm being terribly clear here, but maybe one of our Suh-thun-uhs can help clarify if I'm not?

If you don't like whoopie pies, I'm not sure if you'd like a moon pie. They're different enough that you might. But it might be worth having a look at it just so you can say you know what they are! :)

Re: Moon Pies

linda on 10/22/02 at 22:26 (098115)

i just read this thread about the moon pies . it was my father's favorite junk food . i buy a box of moon pies on his birthday and the anniversary of his death , then my sister and myself eat a couple of pies until we get sick off the sugar . i wash it down with diet BIG RED ( another RC cola product ) . there is another product on the shelf at Krogers that is similiar to the moon pie , however i cannot think of the name . linda

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Necee on 10/22/02 at 22:59 (098117)

Well Nancy, if you don't like whoopie pies then it's a sure bet you wont like moon pies, they are quite similiar. Moon pies are round, the thin cakelike outer layers are covered with chocolate, and the center is marshmallow. Let me know if that sounds appetizing.

Happy trails......
Necee

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 05:28 (098126)

You really think whoopie pies and moon pies are that similar? I don't think they're close enough to make not liking one a sure bet that you won't like the other, but maybe that's just me...

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 08:21 (098130)

oh gosh, you all have me confused now. nancy n, your description was very full, thank you. and linda, sounds like a nice tradition you and your sis have.

i guess i won't really know until i try a real moon pie, so necee, i'm going to email you with my address! after i receive and eat the moon pie, i'll report the very important findings right here on the social/support board -- if i'm still alive.

nancy

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Kathy G on 10/23/02 at 10:58 (098140)

My gosh, we have discussions on such meaningful subjects, don't we? Well, in answer to your question, Nancy S., I had a whoopie pie once when I was a kid. I can't even remember where or when but in my mind, it was just delicious. My son's preschool sold cookbooks and there was a recipe for them. I hadn't thought of them in years and decided to try them. I vaguely remember that the filling had a ton of shortening in it and I wasn't sure it was such a healthy thing but figured I'd splurge. Remember, this was many years ago and we were just becoming aware of the dangers of fats, etc. Well, I made them and they were a lot of work and absolutely disgusting! We each had one; actually, I think my husband only ate a couple of bites of one and no one liked them. I ended up throwing them away and I've never had one since!

It's so funny; I saw in one of Carole's posts that they weren't allowed to have things like Hostess Cupcakes in her house. My mother must have had mixed ideas. We never had Coke or any soft drinks, never had potato chips, seldom had candy, but I was allowed one package of Hostess Cupcakes for my lunch each day. Isn't that funny? I was a finicky eater so maybe that was something she knew I'd eat. Anyway, I don't think either of my kids have ever had Hostess Cupcakes or Twinkies. I know for sure that my son hasn't ever eaten a Whoopie Pie because he's one of those weird creatures who doesn't like chocolate! I think my daughter bought one at a church fair when she was little and she ended up throwing it out. So, I guess I wouldn't be big into Moon Pies either. But I just love hearing about these things that I didn't even know existed. And like you talk about RC cola. That hardly sells around here and never has. I'm not even sure it's still available. Funny how regional tastes are so different.

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 11:37 (098142)

I sure thought that whoopie pies were a PA Dutch concoction (especially since an article in the Washington Post a few weeks ago included a description of them for the uninitiated). I grew up in Central PA and probably have had several things that would surprise or even disgust peeople from other parts of the country. That said, there are plenty of PA Dutch foods that I won't touch--scrapple is one of them. Hogmaw would be another. I'll still go for chicken pot pie, though (and not the stuff that's baked in a crust, either--REAL pot pie as God intended it), Lebanon bologna, etc...

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 11:42 (098144)

I'm not sure but I think RC went out of business. (?) At least, I haven't seen any lately. In recent years I just drink innocuous things like Diet 7-Up or Diet Dr. Pepper, anyway.

Carole C

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

linda on 10/23/02 at 12:16 (098148)

carole---RC has a plant right close to my home about 3mi away . now i don't drink RC cola but i do drink the Big RED the other RC product . have you ever tried that sweet drink ? this has been a great conversation piece carole . i have been down in the dumps and this has cheered me up . i was glad that i clicked on line yesterday . linda

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 12:33 (098150)

oooo, i don't know, nancy, that real pot pie doesn't sound as good as the fake stuff, even if god did intend it. (do we know this for sure?)

so how different is PA dutch from dutch dutch? my husband grew up in holland, michigan, and his folks and all these other relatives came over here from the old country. when we finally got married, i was given by a purebred dutch person from holland a cookbook full of recipes for food that sounds an awful lot like those names you just threw out here. i think i put the book in my shop for sale. i never cooked any of them, and not much else for that matter.

it would make sense to me if whoopie pies came from the dutch, but i'm no expert. obviously!

nancy

Re: To Carole and Nancy S.

Necee on 10/23/02 at 12:48 (098152)

RC cola is alive and well in Texas, it's a lot like Pepsi, and a very popular soda here, besides.......after eating that disgusting moon pie, you have to have something to wash it down with!!! Get ready Nancy S. your moon pie is own its way!!!!! Enjoy!!

Happy trails.......
Necee

Re: To Carole and Nancy S.

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 14:18 (098161)

I remember RC cola quite well, mostly from my youth. Later, RC was the only cola offered at the Arby's on Southwest Parkway in College Station, Texas, when I lived there. But in the mid 1990's, they switched to another cola. That's why I thought that RC cola might not be available any more.

Glad to hear that it's still out there. :)

Carole C

Re: To Nancy S. Re: Moon Pies

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 14:20 (098162)

Linda, thanks for the tip! :) If I should ever magically become slim, maybe I'll drink Big Red again. Right now, I don't drink non-diet sodas because of the sugar.

Actually, I drink more water than anything. We have really GREAT water here in Metairie, Louisiana. Wouldn't go well with a moon pie, though. :)

Carole

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 14:23 (098163)

I love scrapple. My mother used to fry it quite frequently when we were children. She wasn't Pennsylvania Dutch, or from anywhere near Pennsylvania, so I don't know what gave her the inspiration to make scrapple so much. I haven't had it since childhood.

I have never heard of Hogmaw or Lebanon bologna.

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 14:28 (098165)

oh dear. now i must ask.

what is scrapple?

Re: To Carole and Nancy S.

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 14:33 (098166)

oh wow! thanks, necee baby! i hope you're not sending RC cola with it. i do remember that from my youth (vaguely), but now i drink only water, decaf coffee, or wine. feel free to include a bottle of j lohr chardonnay.
nancy

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 15:55 (098171)

It's sort of a fried potato pancake, if my memory serves me correctly. Bear in mind that I haven't had it since the 1950's. :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/23/02 at 16:07 (098173)

did you say potato? my favorite food? could you send me one of those fried potato pancakes? i would like food coming in from all over the country ... no, all over the world. then i could stop worrying over my noncookness.

really, that scrapple sounds great to me.

nancy

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 16:31 (098175)

It really is. I'm fishing back into my hazy memories from 50 years ago, here, but I think she used to fry it with sausage and eggs at breakfast sometimes. I seem to recall it tasting a little like sausage anyway. Maybe it had a lot of other ingredients... potato pancake is my best guess but what does a kid know about what's in the food she eats? LOL

I have no idea of how to cook them, nor have I seen any since that time. You wouldn't want one in the mail, anyway, because it would become a cold mess by the time you got it. :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 16:34 (098176)

No, it's not a potato pancake. Not even close. If it were a potato pancake, I'd eat it.

I found the following description at a site called 'la casa de scrapple.' Read it only if you really want to know, it's not pleasant (as it's composed largely of miscellaneous pig parts)...

'First, a few more words for the uninitiated... Scrapple is a processed meat product composed of cuts and pieces of meat which -- for one reason or another -- will not make meals in themselves. The bulk of these come to us courtesy of the face, head, and chest cavity of the common hog.

'Scrapple should never be confused with Spam. A product of the Hormel Foods Corporation, Spam is spiced ham in a can - ham being the upper portion of a pig's hind leg. Scrapple, on the other hand, is an amalgamation of tendons, cartilage, feet, skin, ears, nose, gums and more. In short, it's all the garbage that should be thrown away. Some people eat it. Really.'

Aren't you glad you asked?

Hog Maw is a stuffed pig's stomach (what can I saw, pigs are popular food for the PA Dutch). I imagine it's somewhat similar to haggis, but I won't eat that, either, so I couldn't tell you. It's full of stuff like sausage, potatoes, and onions, which don't sound so bad to me bu I'm not going anywhere near the pig's stomach, thankyouverymuch.

Lebanon bologna is bologna that's spicier than regular bologna. Oscar Meyer is positively bland by comparison. I've been craving the stuff for a few weeks (which is interesting all on its own!) so it's a good thing I'll be able to get some this weekend.

That's it for me and the Dutchie foods--for now!

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 16:39 (098177)

OOPS! You are SO right.

GMTA (Great Minds Think Alike). I was off looking for a link too. Here's the one that I found.

http://www.mememap.org/scrapple.html

You are right! It's got cornmeal, not potatos, but I was right about the sausage taste. (grin)

I think I'll avoid Hog Maw, but Lebanon bologna sounds pretty good. :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 16:41 (098178)

Nancy--

PA Dutch isn't at all like Dutch Dutch--largely because PA Dutch is a misnomer. PA German is more accurate. I have ancestors who are German and some who are Swiss German. So any similarity to actual Dutch food is purely coincidental.

I have no problem with PA Dutch desserts (aside from the fact that they're TOO good and will sit in your stomach for hours, if not days!). Whoopie pies, shoo-fly pies, sugar cakes, apple dumplings... they all work for me. It's some of the meat dishes that gross me out (see my post on scrapple and hog maw below!). And I will swear till the day I die that you haven't really had chicken pot pie unless you've had the boiled variety, which is the real thing--no actual 'pie' involved. My grandmother makes that every year after Thanksgiving and Christmas, with the leftover turkey, broth, and turkey gravy. She throws in potatoes, celery and carrots, and bowtie pasta, seasons it, and I think that's about it. I remember making ham pot pie with my great-grandmother when I was a kid, and cutting the noodles to go into it. I am not a big fan of ham, but I have to admit that I think my great-grandmother's ham pot pie was even better than the chicken/turkey pot pie. Don't knock it till you've tried it!!!

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 16:43 (098179)

Well, I got a laugh out of the idea of scrapple being a potato pancake, I have to admit. I'll have to share that with my grandmother when I talk to her next. I can understand how you'd only remember the sausage flavor, though!! (Now, my grandmother would eat scrapple and hog maw and think nothing of it. I'd probably eat the hog maw filling as long as it never saw the inside of a pig's stomach. Ick.)

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 16:57 (098180)

Maybe my 'little girl palate' just thought it was good so it must be potatos. :)

I don't think I'd eat the hog maw even to be polite, unless I didn't know what it was. You are brave!!! :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/23/02 at 17:04 (098181)

Oh no, I'm not saying I'd eat it to be polite!! I meant that I'd eat the filling, if it was prepared on its own and never ever ever saw the inside of anybody's stomach but mine!!

Ain't no chance I'm THAT brave!! :)

Re: Regional foods

Carole C in NOLA on 10/23/02 at 18:10 (098184)

OH! OK, I thought you meant you'd scoop out the filling and eat it. LOL

And here I thought you were a veritable culinary Daniel Boone, bravely exploring the world of stuffed animal stomachs! :)

Carole C

Re: Regional foods

Julie on 10/24/02 at 03:05 (098201)

Time I contributed from across the pond. Do you all know about haggis? It's a favourite in Scotland: a sheep's stomach, stuffed with grain and offal and boiled till done. It's delicious. Eaten with 'neeps and nips' (mashed turnips and whiskey, preferably malt).

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/24/02 at 05:57 (098203)

Julie--

I have heard of haggis, to be sure, but you won't catch me anywhere near it. I think it's probably somewhat similar to hogmaw, but perhaps only because they're both stuffed stomachs. That's where my problem is--just not into the whole 'stuffed stomach' thing unless it's mine, and even then it's not always a good thing!! ;)

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/24/02 at 07:38 (098208)

what a lot of 'parts' were being tossed out here as i innocently slept! you've all convinced me to avoid all of it (except maybe that real pot pie, nancy).

i'll put it all out of my mind now and wait for necee's whoopie pie, which i promise to give a full review of here on the board.

nancy
p.s. I saw haggis at dinner at a scottish inn here in maine about twenty years ago. i didn't taste it. it looked like, well, garbage, and this was one fancy place.

Re: Regional foods

Julie on 10/24/02 at 08:32 (098215)

Don't be misled by haggis's appearance, Nancy. It's a dish fit for the gods.

Re: Regional foods

Kathy G on 10/24/02 at 14:25 (098251)

Julie,

I've heard of haggis but I probably wouldn't eat it intentionally. I might even like it if someone gave it to me and didn't tell me, until afterward, what it was! Which reminds me of one of the biggest faux pas of my youth. I was about 22 and we were invited to a dinner party at the home of my very wealthy, sophisticated boss. We were served curry with something through it or maybe it was on top of it, I don't really remember. What I do remember is that we were just starting to eat when he remarked that we were eating quail eggs. Being a sophisticated woman of the world, I blurted, 'Oh, I wish you hadn't told us before we ate it!' Of course, as soon as the word were out, I nearly died. The wife of one of the other firm partners rescued me by saying, 'That's all right, Kathy. You just say what everyone else is thinking!' All these years later, I now know that quail eggs aren't that unusual but to a young, inexperienced connosieur of food, it sounded strange indeed.

My mother used to make delicious Irish potato pancakes she called Boxtie. And she also made German potato pancakes. I know the Irish version was made from grated raw potatoes and I'm pretty sure the German ones were made from mashed potatoes. I haven't thought of them in years. They were so good! So many of her recipes were never written down. Some I can make from memory but I'm trying to measure and write down the ingredients in case either of my children ever want to make them. My son and daughter both like to cook.

Carole, I'm really glad you started this whole discussion! Thanks to everyone for making it so much fun!

Re: Regional foods

nancy s. on 10/24/02 at 14:38 (098253)

kathy, i know how you feel making a faux pas like that at someone's hoity-toity dinner table. (it was nice you had rescuers.)

i once was taken by my upwardly mobile boyfriend to the home of some extremely fancy friends of his, for dinner, just the four of us. what a layout, fancy china and crystal and silver, etc. etc. She put the food on the table, and we all passed it around very elegantly, and then i took a bite of the fowl on my plate.

'Wow!' i cried. 'This is the BEST chicken i EVER tasted!'

dead silence. then my boyfriend mumbled to me, 'it's capon.'

i had to look the word up in the dictionary when we got home, but in the meantime i wanted to crawl under the table. thank god we broke up and i never had to go back there again. i also stayed away from upwardly mobile boyfriends after that. phil and i ain't rich, but we love our life -- although it'd be nice to be able to afford health insurance!

nancy

Re: Regional foods

Kathy G on 10/24/02 at 15:08 (098259)

Nancy,

I know, we uncouth people may not know much about them manners but we're happy, by golly! I'm probably most happy with a pizza from Uno's or a meal from the local Italian restaurant! I learned a great deal from those folks. For example, the house was an enormous mansion and what I most remember about it was that it was cold and dark. And that all the Orientals were really, really worn. (Maybe that's what they mean by 'old' money.) And, like you, I was perfectly happy with my station in life. And yes, I can't believe we actually live in a time when health insurance is not a given but something that so many have to live without or, in order to have it, must sacrifice some of life's other essentials. It's a disgrace.

Re: Regional foods

Nancy N on 10/24/02 at 16:49 (098275)

I'll have to take your word for it, at least for now, Julie. If I were ever to be brave enough to try it, I'd want the real deal, cooked over on your side of the pond. You can get canned haggis here (if you know where to look), but that's about the only thing that sounds worse than the regular version to me! :)

Re: Canned haggis...

Julie on 10/25/02 at 02:05 (098317)

....sounds like a very, very bad idea.