Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

looking for guidance here

Posted by Chris K. on 10/25/02 at 22:06 (098358)

Dear Doctors:
I just started taking time off from running to try and get rid of my persisting PF. I've had it since spring, but being the stubborn (and typical) runner, I tried to run through it. But now that I've wisened up, I have some questions as to the most effective self-treatment for geting rid of it:
What is the single best treatment for PF? Night splints seem to be miracle workers, but I simply cannot afford the 60-80 bucks they cost (darn college loans!). Are there any ways to make homemade ones?
Would heel cushions be recommended for easing the pressure on the Achilles and heel? I actually work at a running store, so I could get them pretty easily.
Is massage good for the PF? I've always thought that gently massaging the tender area would be good for my condition, simply because it promotes blood flow to the area and the breakup of scar tissue. But others have told me that massage to the sensitive area is a definite no-no. Does that mean I should even stop using a golf or tennis ball to massage the bottom of my foot, then?
How about cross training activities? I am currently swimming, but just don't enjoy it very much (I basically stink at it!). I was wondering if biking would be an acceptable form-- would it place too much stress on the heel/plantar fasciitis attachment? I would definitely prefer biking.
Are there any other suggestions that anyone would have for me? I really love running, but do not want to jeopardize being able to run years from now by continuing to run through it. Any and all suggestions would be greatly appreciated!!
Thanks in advance for all your help!

Chris K.
Canton, Ohio

Re: looking for guidance here

Ed Davis, DPM on 10/25/02 at 22:48 (098364)

Chris:
Plantar fascia can be caused and maintained by a number of biomechanical factors so without knowing what those factors are, we are guessing at treatment. A lot of patients with tight gastrosoleus achilles complexes have recalcitrant PF so night splints work for them. Night splints would be signifcantly less effective if your gastrosoleus is not tight. A number of PF patients are overpronated and thus benefit from motion control running shoes -- eg. Brooks Beast, Brooks Addiction V, New Balance 587 , 1121 .... A number of OTC inserts can be helpful with Superfeet being my favorite.

If some of the above do not help, you may need professional help. Plantar fasciitis that hangs around for a long time can become harder to deal with so it may be better (and ultimately less expensive) to seek professional help sooner than later.
Ed

Re: looking for guidance here

Ed Davis, DPM on 10/25/02 at 22:48 (098364)

Chris:
Plantar fascia can be caused and maintained by a number of biomechanical factors so without knowing what those factors are, we are guessing at treatment. A lot of patients with tight gastrosoleus achilles complexes have recalcitrant PF so night splints work for them. Night splints would be signifcantly less effective if your gastrosoleus is not tight. A number of PF patients are overpronated and thus benefit from motion control running shoes -- eg. Brooks Beast, Brooks Addiction V, New Balance 587 , 1121 .... A number of OTC inserts can be helpful with Superfeet being my favorite.

If some of the above do not help, you may need professional help. Plantar fasciitis that hangs around for a long time can become harder to deal with so it may be better (and ultimately less expensive) to seek professional help sooner than later.
Ed