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Rain, rain go away......

Posted by Necee on 10/28/02 at 21:44 (098521)

Would you believe we haven't seen the sun here in 13 days!!! It poured again today, and more rain is in the forcast. Hope ya'll are having much nicer weather where you are.

Happy trails....

Necee

Re: Rain, rain go away......

john h on 10/29/02 at 08:53 (098540)

Necee: We have not seen the sun in Little Rock in two weeks and the rain continues today. At the end of the week one of Wendy's Canadian fronts is suppsed to invade our state with temps dropping to freezing in the northern part of the state. Our normal high would be 70 this time of year. Feel like I am back in Iceland during the winter when the sun never shines. Only thing, then I was 21,single,and many lovely Nordic Icelandic girls to date.

Re: Cry me a river?

wendyn on 10/29/02 at 13:24 (098566)

It's cold and snowy here. The streets are really icey - and it's supposed to go down to around -20 C tonight.

Any time you want to trade Necee - you just say the word!!!!!!!!!!!

Re: Cry me a river?

nancy s. on 10/29/02 at 14:08 (098574)

oh heck, wendy, what is -20 C in Fahrenheit? (if you know.) we tried to get used to the Centigrade system here in the '70s, but it didn't take. i want to know just how cold you are. it was 27 F here in maine last night -- but i suspect that's not so cold as you will be tonight, eh?

nancy, another American Centigrade failure
.

Re: Rain, rain go away......

Carole C in NOLA on 10/29/02 at 15:25 (098587)

It's been pouring rain all day here in New Orleans, too. At least it's not below zero like Wendy's been experiencing. Actually, the rain felt kind of nice when I went home for lunch. Warm, and fresh. I didn't have to stay out in it, which helped.

Carole C

Re: Cry me a river?

carynz on 10/29/02 at 15:46 (098590)

Heh Nancy. I used to live where Wendy lives and -20celcius is about 11 or 12deg.F. You have to double the temperature and then subtract 32 if it's a minus celcius. If it's 20deg celcius then you double the 20 and add 32 so it would 72deg F. which would be a lot nicer. -20 is not that bad because I can tell you that the sky will be a brilliant shade of blue and the sun will be vibrant and warming you up. The air is dry and crisp not damp like where I am on the west coast and it's still hard to adapt too and not great for the old foot problems either.

The snow is crisp too not that wet, slushy, sloppy jaloppy stuff that is hard to drive around in.

Since we're talking weather here, it's a beautiful sunny day here in the Fraser Valley about 1 hour east of Vancouver. We can see the mountains on one side of us and we have a fabulous view of Mt. Baker (in Washington State) which is showing very little snow still. They are expecting some snow at h igher elevations in the next couple of weeks which means we will see some white stuff on the Rockies and at Whistler too. Last night this windstorm blew in off the ocean and it was howling and whistling through the windows. My windchimes were blowing away and our BBQ cover actually blew right off onto the lawn and our car top carrier which hangs from the side of our fence flipped upside down against one of the windows - thankfully nothing broke. The fall leaves are everywhere in all their splendour and we have this huge swirl of leaves in our driveway which I'm sure the kids will crunch when they get home from school later today.

I'm going to have a peripheal nerve block injection later this afternoon and not sure what to expect. My DPM is going to do this before I have the NCT done I guess so they can tell where the nerve is actually compressed. I'm not sure what to expect!

Oh well I guess it's not any worse that what I (and the rest of us) go through everyday with my foot pain.

Cheers to you!
Caryn

Re: Cry me a river?

carynz on 10/29/02 at 15:50 (098591)

hi Wendy - god I can't remember what -20 even feels like now that we have been out in the Fraser Valley for 7 yrs. I do miss the good old white stuff though rather that than the rain any day. I just saw on the news last night that Ottawa has the best drivers, you guys were 3rd (yippee) and to the north of you was the worst!!! Vancouver was even in the top 10 although that does not surprise me, everyone goes so darn fast to get to the next red light it seems. Today is about 10c although we had this huge windstorm blow in off he ocean last night and things were swirling everywhere. I'm sure there were some power lines down somewhere in Vancouver, we don't have to worry so much here in the valley.

Hope all the roads are dry again now for driving and stuff outside.

toodle loo
caryn

Re: Rain, rain go away......

Nancy N on 10/29/02 at 16:11 (098593)

It's raining here, too (we need it) and was so cold this morning I got my winter coat out. And am I ever glad I did! It's not much warmer out there now than it was when I left for work. And when I got to my car tonight, there was ice on my windshield, apparently from sleet that fell this afternoon!

What happened to Autumn--why do we have to go right into winter??

Re: Cry me a river?

nancy s. on 10/29/02 at 16:20 (098594)

thanks, caryn -- i'm cutting and pasting that so i'll never be stupid again. (where did i get centigrade? must be left over from the one-room schoolhouse.)
nancy
.

Re: Conversion

wendyn on 10/29/02 at 20:19 (098613)

I go to an environment canada website that automatically converts to imperial units.

The temperature tonight will be a balmy -6 F.

(Nancy - you slipped that 'eh' in there like a pro! You could put on your touque and sip a Molson to celebrate that one)

Re: Nancy

wendyn on 10/29/02 at 20:25 (098615)

You think you're messed up with not knowing celcius?

I learned only metric in school. But here we seem to be stuck half way between the two systems. I think distance and speed in kiometres - but I measure height in feet and inches and weight in pounds. I have no idea how many inches are in a yard - or how many pints in a gallon. I don't know how big a mile is, or how fast 40 mph is. I can tell you that I'm about 120 lbs and 5 foot 2, but I couldn't tell you how many kilograms I am (without converting) or how many centimetres tall I am.

I am totally mixed up. It's sad.

Re: Nancy

nancy s. on 10/29/02 at 20:35 (098616)

ohhh, wendy, that IS sad. there are 36 inches in a yard (that's 3 feet, because there are 12 inches per foot -- foot as in measurement, not as in body part).

there, now we're both a tad less mixed up than we were before tonight, eh?

'eh' slips into my speech and writing quite often now. a lot of native mainers say it all the time, and i've been here too long (14 years). i don't mind, though. to me the sound is more graceful than 'huh?'.

nancy
.

Re: IT DID! (nm)

Carole C in NOLA on 10/30/02 at 10:47 (098664)

.

Re: The metric system

Kathy G on 10/30/02 at 12:05 (098673)

It never ceases to amaze me that the US didn't adopt the metric system. I'm only slightly better than Nancy S at converting but that's because I used to vacation in PEI. My son, who's 28, had to learn metric because supposedly the US was going to adopt it so that we'd be like the rest of the world. By the time my daughter came along, seven years later, there was no mention of it. I wonder what happened?

Re: Cry me a river?

john h on 10/30/02 at 15:06 (098686)

Carynz: I clearly remember 100 mph winds and temps (not wind chill) hovering around 90 degrees below in Thule, Greenland. When these high winds would suddenly roll in you stayed exactly in the quanset hut you were in. Hopefully the Officer Club. Nothing moved. quanset huts sank seveal inches each year as the entire base was constructed on ice. In fact I do not remember anything but ice and everything being white. dam! the people even turned white after a year up there. You did not flush toilets in this enviroment. You had a handle that you pumped sewage down with.

Re: The metric system

Nancy N on 10/30/02 at 16:08 (098692)

Kathy--

I remember being told in elementary school that we all had to learn the metric system because soon it would be all we used. That was in the mid-to-late 70s. We learned the nuts and bolts of it, but never had to use it for any practical purposes, so it didn't mean much (but when you're in second grade, how much use do you really have for units of measurement, anyway?). But I agree with you, why bother to go through all that and then not use it? It made life interesting for me when I lived in Northern Ireland and could never figure out what the weather forecast was telling me because all I could remember of the Celsius system was 0 and 100!

Re: The metric system

carynz on 10/30/02 at 17:52 (098698)

you know what's comical is this. My husband never did learn the metric system in school and does everything in standard measurements and 2400 clock for time. I did the switch over from standard to metric in school but still think in feet and inches myself. My kids who are in grades 8 and 10 don't know anything but metric and have a hard time if something comes up in standard measurements so if a recipe says 1 tsp. they want to know how many millilitres it is.

Go Figure Eh!

Hope everyone is having a great day :) Caryn Z

Re: Cry me a river?

carynz on 10/30/02 at 22:44 (098750)

wow! I sure hope it's warmer where you are now. The wind has blown over and the leaves are all over the ground, fall is definitely here but it was a beautiful sunny day today.

cheers Caryn

Re: The metric system

wendyn on 10/30/02 at 23:28 (098757)

The baking stuff I can convert (too many recipie books in imperial system)

one teaspoon is 5 ml
one tablespoon is 15 ml
one cup is 250 ml
8 ounces is one cup which is 250 ml (I think - the 8 ounces has caused me problems before because I had NO idea how much that was)

The one that really screws me up is when I find a recipie (I can't spell tonight) that calls for one stick of butter. We don't have a stick of butter. The last time I ran into this I had to call my aunt in Boston.

Re: Wendy, a stick of butter is a 1/4 of a pound...

Julie on 10/31/02 at 01:26 (098767)

...but your Boston auntie probably told you that, so this is a redundant message.

Nice talking to you, anyway!

Re: Julie

wendyn on 10/31/02 at 07:18 (098771)

Julie, that was a while ago, so I've forgotten how much it measures up to.

Now I will show my true ignorance of the Imperial system.

Is 1/4 of a pound the same as a 1/4 cup?

Re: Wendy

Julie on 10/31/02 at 08:28 (098787)

I'm not sure. I'm just thinking on my feet. A 'cup' is 16 fluid ounces, so maybe they are the same. But can liquid and solid measurements be compared? Come to think of it, I remember recipes in cookbooks from my childhood that called for '1/4 cup of butter'. Was it a 1/4 of a pound? I don't but. I always wondered how that worked.

Re: Wendy

Nancy N on 10/31/02 at 08:52 (098789)

Hopefully I can help a little here without causing more confusion!

A cup is always 8 ounces, be it dry or fluid. A cup is also made up of 16 tablespoons.

16 ounces is a pound in terms of weight. In volume, 16 ounces is 2 cups, aka a pint.

1/4 cup isn't much--2 ounces by volume, or four tablespoons. Probably not enough to be a quarter pound, but that depends on what you're weighing. Water is heavier than sugar probably is, etc etc. Butter would definitely not come out as an equivalent measurement--I don't remember off the top of my head, but I think a stick of butter here is marked into at least 8 tablespoons, which would make it a half cup. It might be more, though. I don't remember how many tablespoon markings they put on the wrappers.

Tablespoons in the US and the UK are not equal measurements. I recall the UK version being more, and being a rather rough measurement.

Now you know why I never tried to convert the recipes I got in Ireland--it would drive you to drink. Since most ingredients are measured by weight there anyway, I just get out my food scale whenever I want to cook one of those recipes, and save myself the heartache and frustration!

Re: Wendy

nancy s. on 10/31/02 at 10:01 (098795)

now i know why i can't cook and won't be cooking in the future.

Re: Nancy

john h on 10/31/02 at 10:26 (098802)

When flying world wide English is the common language for all controlers, airport towers, etc. When dealing in heights it is always in meteres in nations except the U.S. Temps are in celsius and time is always in Greenwich Mean Time (Julie Time I call it). My first few flights into Europe I really had a problem with language. Even though English is the language there are many controllers who have very tough accents to follow until you get a handle on it. More pilot info: For every 1000 feet in altitude you climb the standard lapse rate is 2 degree celcius so if you go to 30,000 feet on a stadard day you will drop 60 degrees celcius in temp Just thought you all needed to know this. My lesson for today..

Re: Wendy

john h on 10/31/02 at 10:44 (098806)

to experience some major cooking problems move to someplace like Cheyenne where I moved to from sea level. Cheyenne is around 7,000 feet above sea level. I learned the meaning of a 'pressure cooker' up there.

Re: Wendy

Nancy N on 10/31/02 at 10:49 (098807)

John--

Are you trying to tell us that you learned this lesson in an explosive way? :)

Re: Cups

Julie on 10/31/02 at 16:31 (098829)

Thanks, Nancy. I knew there was something wrong there. 40 years away from 'cup' measurements, I suppose I was bound to forget.

Re: John

Julie on 10/31/02 at 16:36 (098830)

John! You mean you've really named a time zone after me? You Have Made My Day.

Speaking of 'English' accents, I called the Immigration and Nationality Department of our Home Office yesterday. I wanted to find out what has happened to my application for British citizenship (filed 22 months ago!) I got a Scottish chap to speak to and couldn't understand a word he said. I think he was a Glaswegian, and although I've had plenty of practice in talking to people from Glasgow, he had the proverbial accent you could cut with a knife.

I'm still not sure what's happened to my application. I think he said something about 8 weeks...we shall see.

Re: John

Nancy N on 10/31/02 at 20:47 (098850)

Julie--

It's funny you should mention accents--I've been meaning to tell you how lovely your accent is on your tape. Not quite full British, but not the original Middle Atlantic American, either. Really a lovely combination of the two.

I try not to think about my two encounters with UK Immigration folks (one at Gatwick airport when I was so tired I could barely remember my name, and one when I wanted to extend my tourist visa so I could stay another week). Not necessarily evil chaps, but not the sort you'd treat to a pint at the pub, either. Good luck with them! (And I agree that thick Scots accents can be the hardest to discern of all the UK/Irish accents, in my experience!)

Re: wendy?

nancy s. on 10/31/02 at 21:02 (098854)

wendy, maybe you know the answer to this. where do newfoundlanders' accents come from originally? is it ireland? i participated in an oral history research project in newfoundland twenty years ago, for two weeks, and i had to adjust really quickly -- their speech sounded about half foreign language to me. (really beautiful, mind you, but off my radar screen.)

at the time i did know the origins of their speech, but a little bit of dementia in the meantime has erased what i once knew.

nancy
.

Re: Newfies

wendyn on 10/31/02 at 21:40 (098857)

For some reason I think it's the Scottish roots - but I could be wrong.

I have trouble understanding some of them, especially after a few beers (them not me)

Re: Nancy

Julie on 11/01/02 at 02:39 (098868)

Thank you, my dear. That's very nice of you.

Re: The metric system

Andrue on 11/01/02 at 03:29 (098870)

Well the UK is officially metric but in some areas we have yet to change..and aren't likely to. The most obvious area is motoring. Distances are still measured in miles and yards (too much hassle to change I reckon). Consequently although fuel is sold in litres we all still think of 'miles per gallon'.

Temperature is another area. A lot of the older generation (40s onward) still think in Farenheit and weather forecasters sometimes still don't give the temperature in centigrade.

Re: John

john h on 11/02/02 at 14:38 (099049)

Julie: When making radar approaches into Scotland and even England with Scottish and English controllers they are really laid back in their language and tempo. When making a radar approach in the U.S. the controller is constantly giving you minute corrections without a second of silence. In the U.K and Scotland the controllers might wait 10-15 seconds before they give you a correction. This was mind boggleing for me until I got accustomed to it. I guess it goes with the laid back personalities of the people. When I was a lad of 21 I was dating a Scotish lass in Prestiwick several times a month. I loved her language. We would go to dances in a big town hall sometimes and I quickly learned you always, always moved forward in a circle. You never took a backward step. Do not what that was all about. The Officers Club was an old Scottish castle on a hillside with burning firplaces and all.

Re: Rain, rain go away......

john h on 10/29/02 at 08:53 (098540)

Necee: We have not seen the sun in Little Rock in two weeks and the rain continues today. At the end of the week one of Wendy's Canadian fronts is suppsed to invade our state with temps dropping to freezing in the northern part of the state. Our normal high would be 70 this time of year. Feel like I am back in Iceland during the winter when the sun never shines. Only thing, then I was 21,single,and many lovely Nordic Icelandic girls to date.

Re: Cry me a river?

wendyn on 10/29/02 at 13:24 (098566)

It's cold and snowy here. The streets are really icey - and it's supposed to go down to around -20 C tonight.

Any time you want to trade Necee - you just say the word!!!!!!!!!!!

Re: Cry me a river?

nancy s. on 10/29/02 at 14:08 (098574)

oh heck, wendy, what is -20 C in Fahrenheit? (if you know.) we tried to get used to the Centigrade system here in the '70s, but it didn't take. i want to know just how cold you are. it was 27 F here in maine last night -- but i suspect that's not so cold as you will be tonight, eh?

nancy, another American Centigrade failure
.

Re: Rain, rain go away......

Carole C in NOLA on 10/29/02 at 15:25 (098587)

It's been pouring rain all day here in New Orleans, too. At least it's not below zero like Wendy's been experiencing. Actually, the rain felt kind of nice when I went home for lunch. Warm, and fresh. I didn't have to stay out in it, which helped.

Carole C

Re: Cry me a river?

carynz on 10/29/02 at 15:46 (098590)

Heh Nancy. I used to live where Wendy lives and -20celcius is about 11 or 12deg.F. You have to double the temperature and then subtract 32 if it's a minus celcius. If it's 20deg celcius then you double the 20 and add 32 so it would 72deg F. which would be a lot nicer. -20 is not that bad because I can tell you that the sky will be a brilliant shade of blue and the sun will be vibrant and warming you up. The air is dry and crisp not damp like where I am on the west coast and it's still hard to adapt too and not great for the old foot problems either.

The snow is crisp too not that wet, slushy, sloppy jaloppy stuff that is hard to drive around in.

Since we're talking weather here, it's a beautiful sunny day here in the Fraser Valley about 1 hour east of Vancouver. We can see the mountains on one side of us and we have a fabulous view of Mt. Baker (in Washington State) which is showing very little snow still. They are expecting some snow at h igher elevations in the next couple of weeks which means we will see some white stuff on the Rockies and at Whistler too. Last night this windstorm blew in off the ocean and it was howling and whistling through the windows. My windchimes were blowing away and our BBQ cover actually blew right off onto the lawn and our car top carrier which hangs from the side of our fence flipped upside down against one of the windows - thankfully nothing broke. The fall leaves are everywhere in all their splendour and we have this huge swirl of leaves in our driveway which I'm sure the kids will crunch when they get home from school later today.

I'm going to have a peripheal nerve block injection later this afternoon and not sure what to expect. My DPM is going to do this before I have the NCT done I guess so they can tell where the nerve is actually compressed. I'm not sure what to expect!

Oh well I guess it's not any worse that what I (and the rest of us) go through everyday with my foot pain.

Cheers to you!
Caryn

Re: Cry me a river?

carynz on 10/29/02 at 15:50 (098591)

hi Wendy - god I can't remember what -20 even feels like now that we have been out in the Fraser Valley for 7 yrs. I do miss the good old white stuff though rather that than the rain any day. I just saw on the news last night that Ottawa has the best drivers, you guys were 3rd (yippee) and to the north of you was the worst!!! Vancouver was even in the top 10 although that does not surprise me, everyone goes so darn fast to get to the next red light it seems. Today is about 10c although we had this huge windstorm blow in off he ocean last night and things were swirling everywhere. I'm sure there were some power lines down somewhere in Vancouver, we don't have to worry so much here in the valley.

Hope all the roads are dry again now for driving and stuff outside.

toodle loo
caryn

Re: Rain, rain go away......

Nancy N on 10/29/02 at 16:11 (098593)

It's raining here, too (we need it) and was so cold this morning I got my winter coat out. And am I ever glad I did! It's not much warmer out there now than it was when I left for work. And when I got to my car tonight, there was ice on my windshield, apparently from sleet that fell this afternoon!

What happened to Autumn--why do we have to go right into winter??

Re: Cry me a river?

nancy s. on 10/29/02 at 16:20 (098594)

thanks, caryn -- i'm cutting and pasting that so i'll never be stupid again. (where did i get centigrade? must be left over from the one-room schoolhouse.)
nancy
.

Re: Conversion

wendyn on 10/29/02 at 20:19 (098613)

I go to an environment canada website that automatically converts to imperial units.

The temperature tonight will be a balmy -6 F.

(Nancy - you slipped that 'eh' in there like a pro! You could put on your touque and sip a Molson to celebrate that one)

Re: Nancy

wendyn on 10/29/02 at 20:25 (098615)

You think you're messed up with not knowing celcius?

I learned only metric in school. But here we seem to be stuck half way between the two systems. I think distance and speed in kiometres - but I measure height in feet and inches and weight in pounds. I have no idea how many inches are in a yard - or how many pints in a gallon. I don't know how big a mile is, or how fast 40 mph is. I can tell you that I'm about 120 lbs and 5 foot 2, but I couldn't tell you how many kilograms I am (without converting) or how many centimetres tall I am.

I am totally mixed up. It's sad.

Re: Nancy

nancy s. on 10/29/02 at 20:35 (098616)

ohhh, wendy, that IS sad. there are 36 inches in a yard (that's 3 feet, because there are 12 inches per foot -- foot as in measurement, not as in body part).

there, now we're both a tad less mixed up than we were before tonight, eh?

'eh' slips into my speech and writing quite often now. a lot of native mainers say it all the time, and i've been here too long (14 years). i don't mind, though. to me the sound is more graceful than 'huh?'.

nancy
.

Re: IT DID! (nm)

Carole C in NOLA on 10/30/02 at 10:47 (098664)

.

Re: The metric system

Kathy G on 10/30/02 at 12:05 (098673)

It never ceases to amaze me that the US didn't adopt the metric system. I'm only slightly better than Nancy S at converting but that's because I used to vacation in PEI. My son, who's 28, had to learn metric because supposedly the US was going to adopt it so that we'd be like the rest of the world. By the time my daughter came along, seven years later, there was no mention of it. I wonder what happened?

Re: Cry me a river?

john h on 10/30/02 at 15:06 (098686)

Carynz: I clearly remember 100 mph winds and temps (not wind chill) hovering around 90 degrees below in Thule, Greenland. When these high winds would suddenly roll in you stayed exactly in the quanset hut you were in. Hopefully the Officer Club. Nothing moved. quanset huts sank seveal inches each year as the entire base was constructed on ice. In fact I do not remember anything but ice and everything being white. dam! the people even turned white after a year up there. You did not flush toilets in this enviroment. You had a handle that you pumped sewage down with.

Re: The metric system

Nancy N on 10/30/02 at 16:08 (098692)

Kathy--

I remember being told in elementary school that we all had to learn the metric system because soon it would be all we used. That was in the mid-to-late 70s. We learned the nuts and bolts of it, but never had to use it for any practical purposes, so it didn't mean much (but when you're in second grade, how much use do you really have for units of measurement, anyway?). But I agree with you, why bother to go through all that and then not use it? It made life interesting for me when I lived in Northern Ireland and could never figure out what the weather forecast was telling me because all I could remember of the Celsius system was 0 and 100!

Re: The metric system

carynz on 10/30/02 at 17:52 (098698)

you know what's comical is this. My husband never did learn the metric system in school and does everything in standard measurements and 2400 clock for time. I did the switch over from standard to metric in school but still think in feet and inches myself. My kids who are in grades 8 and 10 don't know anything but metric and have a hard time if something comes up in standard measurements so if a recipe says 1 tsp. they want to know how many millilitres it is.

Go Figure Eh!

Hope everyone is having a great day :) Caryn Z

Re: Cry me a river?

carynz on 10/30/02 at 22:44 (098750)

wow! I sure hope it's warmer where you are now. The wind has blown over and the leaves are all over the ground, fall is definitely here but it was a beautiful sunny day today.

cheers Caryn

Re: The metric system

wendyn on 10/30/02 at 23:28 (098757)

The baking stuff I can convert (too many recipie books in imperial system)

one teaspoon is 5 ml
one tablespoon is 15 ml
one cup is 250 ml
8 ounces is one cup which is 250 ml (I think - the 8 ounces has caused me problems before because I had NO idea how much that was)

The one that really screws me up is when I find a recipie (I can't spell tonight) that calls for one stick of butter. We don't have a stick of butter. The last time I ran into this I had to call my aunt in Boston.

Re: Wendy, a stick of butter is a 1/4 of a pound...

Julie on 10/31/02 at 01:26 (098767)

...but your Boston auntie probably told you that, so this is a redundant message.

Nice talking to you, anyway!

Re: Julie

wendyn on 10/31/02 at 07:18 (098771)

Julie, that was a while ago, so I've forgotten how much it measures up to.

Now I will show my true ignorance of the Imperial system.

Is 1/4 of a pound the same as a 1/4 cup?

Re: Wendy

Julie on 10/31/02 at 08:28 (098787)

I'm not sure. I'm just thinking on my feet. A 'cup' is 16 fluid ounces, so maybe they are the same. But can liquid and solid measurements be compared? Come to think of it, I remember recipes in cookbooks from my childhood that called for '1/4 cup of butter'. Was it a 1/4 of a pound? I don't but. I always wondered how that worked.

Re: Wendy

Nancy N on 10/31/02 at 08:52 (098789)

Hopefully I can help a little here without causing more confusion!

A cup is always 8 ounces, be it dry or fluid. A cup is also made up of 16 tablespoons.

16 ounces is a pound in terms of weight. In volume, 16 ounces is 2 cups, aka a pint.

1/4 cup isn't much--2 ounces by volume, or four tablespoons. Probably not enough to be a quarter pound, but that depends on what you're weighing. Water is heavier than sugar probably is, etc etc. Butter would definitely not come out as an equivalent measurement--I don't remember off the top of my head, but I think a stick of butter here is marked into at least 8 tablespoons, which would make it a half cup. It might be more, though. I don't remember how many tablespoon markings they put on the wrappers.

Tablespoons in the US and the UK are not equal measurements. I recall the UK version being more, and being a rather rough measurement.

Now you know why I never tried to convert the recipes I got in Ireland--it would drive you to drink. Since most ingredients are measured by weight there anyway, I just get out my food scale whenever I want to cook one of those recipes, and save myself the heartache and frustration!

Re: Wendy

nancy s. on 10/31/02 at 10:01 (098795)

now i know why i can't cook and won't be cooking in the future.

Re: Nancy

john h on 10/31/02 at 10:26 (098802)

When flying world wide English is the common language for all controlers, airport towers, etc. When dealing in heights it is always in meteres in nations except the U.S. Temps are in celsius and time is always in Greenwich Mean Time (Julie Time I call it). My first few flights into Europe I really had a problem with language. Even though English is the language there are many controllers who have very tough accents to follow until you get a handle on it. More pilot info: For every 1000 feet in altitude you climb the standard lapse rate is 2 degree celcius so if you go to 30,000 feet on a stadard day you will drop 60 degrees celcius in temp Just thought you all needed to know this. My lesson for today..

Re: Wendy

john h on 10/31/02 at 10:44 (098806)

to experience some major cooking problems move to someplace like Cheyenne where I moved to from sea level. Cheyenne is around 7,000 feet above sea level. I learned the meaning of a 'pressure cooker' up there.

Re: Wendy

Nancy N on 10/31/02 at 10:49 (098807)

John--

Are you trying to tell us that you learned this lesson in an explosive way? :)

Re: Cups

Julie on 10/31/02 at 16:31 (098829)

Thanks, Nancy. I knew there was something wrong there. 40 years away from 'cup' measurements, I suppose I was bound to forget.

Re: John

Julie on 10/31/02 at 16:36 (098830)

John! You mean you've really named a time zone after me? You Have Made My Day.

Speaking of 'English' accents, I called the Immigration and Nationality Department of our Home Office yesterday. I wanted to find out what has happened to my application for British citizenship (filed 22 months ago!) I got a Scottish chap to speak to and couldn't understand a word he said. I think he was a Glaswegian, and although I've had plenty of practice in talking to people from Glasgow, he had the proverbial accent you could cut with a knife.

I'm still not sure what's happened to my application. I think he said something about 8 weeks...we shall see.

Re: John

Nancy N on 10/31/02 at 20:47 (098850)

Julie--

It's funny you should mention accents--I've been meaning to tell you how lovely your accent is on your tape. Not quite full British, but not the original Middle Atlantic American, either. Really a lovely combination of the two.

I try not to think about my two encounters with UK Immigration folks (one at Gatwick airport when I was so tired I could barely remember my name, and one when I wanted to extend my tourist visa so I could stay another week). Not necessarily evil chaps, but not the sort you'd treat to a pint at the pub, either. Good luck with them! (And I agree that thick Scots accents can be the hardest to discern of all the UK/Irish accents, in my experience!)

Re: wendy?

nancy s. on 10/31/02 at 21:02 (098854)

wendy, maybe you know the answer to this. where do newfoundlanders' accents come from originally? is it ireland? i participated in an oral history research project in newfoundland twenty years ago, for two weeks, and i had to adjust really quickly -- their speech sounded about half foreign language to me. (really beautiful, mind you, but off my radar screen.)

at the time i did know the origins of their speech, but a little bit of dementia in the meantime has erased what i once knew.

nancy
.

Re: Newfies

wendyn on 10/31/02 at 21:40 (098857)

For some reason I think it's the Scottish roots - but I could be wrong.

I have trouble understanding some of them, especially after a few beers (them not me)

Re: Nancy

Julie on 11/01/02 at 02:39 (098868)

Thank you, my dear. That's very nice of you.

Re: The metric system

Andrue on 11/01/02 at 03:29 (098870)

Well the UK is officially metric but in some areas we have yet to change..and aren't likely to. The most obvious area is motoring. Distances are still measured in miles and yards (too much hassle to change I reckon). Consequently although fuel is sold in litres we all still think of 'miles per gallon'.

Temperature is another area. A lot of the older generation (40s onward) still think in Farenheit and weather forecasters sometimes still don't give the temperature in centigrade.

Re: John

john h on 11/02/02 at 14:38 (099049)

Julie: When making radar approaches into Scotland and even England with Scottish and English controllers they are really laid back in their language and tempo. When making a radar approach in the U.S. the controller is constantly giving you minute corrections without a second of silence. In the U.K and Scotland the controllers might wait 10-15 seconds before they give you a correction. This was mind boggleing for me until I got accustomed to it. I guess it goes with the laid back personalities of the people. When I was a lad of 21 I was dating a Scotish lass in Prestiwick several times a month. I loved her language. We would go to dances in a big town hall sometimes and I quickly learned you always, always moved forward in a circle. You never took a backward step. Do not what that was all about. The Officers Club was an old Scottish castle on a hillside with burning firplaces and all.