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****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Posted by Necee on 10/31/02 at 00:33 (098764)

A light freeze is predicted here this week. Thank goodness the rain is gone for now, and the frost is on the pumpkin.

Happy trails......

Necee

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

wendyn on 10/31/02 at 07:19 (098772)

My pumpkins are stinking up the basement. If we put them outside they would melt in -20C (-6F) weather.

Peeeyeeeew!!!!

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Carole C in NOLA on 10/31/02 at 07:30 (098774)

It got down to 60 here last night! I love this brisk and cool weather, and the humidity is down too. No freezes predicted here.

Also, it was daylight when I drove to work this morning at 5:45, and the skies were still bright pink with sunrise. This early daylight was probably an effect of the time change that was masked previously due to the rains. :)

Carole C

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Carole C in NOLA on 10/31/02 at 07:46 (098775)

I haven't seen a basement since 1965. We can't have them here, because they would just fill up with water.

I can't stand it. I've tried really hard not to join in the units conversion stuff.

32 - [20C * (212-32)/(100-0)] = -4 F

Right? Or did I miss some oddness about Canadian temperature measurements?

Carole C

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

wendyn on 10/31/02 at 09:00 (098791)

http://pubweb.northwestern.edu/~hsl700/Fah.html

Here is a site for conversion,

-20 C is -4F

-6F is -21 C

Close.

Either way, it's freakin cold.

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Carole C in NOLA on 10/31/02 at 10:31 (098803)

Actually, if you re-read the posts, my conversion was exactly what your site says.... nobody else's matched. Which was why I finally HAD to post. I just couldn't stand it.

Carole C

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Richard, C.Ped on 10/31/02 at 11:27 (098809)

Thats freakin freezin! Freakin cold to us southerners is 50 degrees F. LOL
Richard, C.Ped

Re: Speaking of pumpkins...Happy Halloween!

Suzanne D on 10/31/02 at 16:00 (098826)

There is a real nip to the air here in Kentucky - just right for Halloween! We had high temperatures in the 40's yesterday and the 50's today. I am about ready to go light my jack-o'-lantern for our trick-or-treaters. I enjoy having many of my students stop by. They really think they are fooling me as they burst forth with, 'Guess who I am?!' and I pretend to be surprised!

Have a good evening, everyone.
Suzanne :-)

Re: Speaking of pumpkins...Happy Halloween!

Kathy G on 11/01/02 at 09:33 (098889)

Hope you all survived the trick or treaters! It's cold this year and we had a lot of kids turn up wearing coats and gloves. I make it a rule not to comment specifically on anyone's costume unless I 'm actually sure I know what they are but I blew it with one little girl last night. She was exceptionally pretty and I said to her, 'Oh, you look just beautiful!' She looked at me, and with great exasperation exclaimed, 'I'm a VAMPIRE!' I told her she was the prettiest vampire I'd ever seen! She really was - I thought she was a princess dressed in black. I guess her mother's idea of a vampire and mine are totally different!

Carole, I get such a kick out of you calling 60 brisk! What a difference from our climate! We've been having cold weather, even for NH. Nighttime temperatures have been dropping to the thirties and the daytimes are about 10-15 degrees (Farenheit!) lower than usual. We've already had a snowfall of about an inch. I think it was on the 23rd. We haven't had snow that early since 1979. I think we may be in for a long winter. My husband golfed yesterday and figured it was his final round. Seeing as he was wearing his winter jacket and the forecast for tomorrow is windy with windchill factors in the low thirties, I had to agree! For the last 8 or 10 years, he's been able to golf right up to Thanksgiving. Maybe we're going back to our old weather patterns but I don't think anyone knows for sure.

The foliage was quite muted this year due to the lack of summer rains but a friend had folks visit from Texas and they thought it was glorious. I guess it's all what you're used to. We have 2 Catalpa trees in our yard, much to my husband's sorrow, and one of them still hasn't dropped its leaves and it looks dreadful. They have very large leaves and they don't turn colors, they just shrivel up and die and then take weeks to actually drop. And then, of course, they still have to drop their beans after that. I love them because the flowers are so fragrant and they look so neat. I've always thought he was just humoring me by not getting them cut down, but this year, I told him that maybe we should replace them with less messy trees. He never attempted to hire anyone to cut them down so maybe he thinks they're pretty, too. But with the early turn in the weather and no Indian Summer in sight, he may be out there in the snow cleaning up their leaves. He'll probably forget how pretty they are in the summer and I suspect they'll be gone by next year!

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Necee on 11/01/02 at 12:56 (098916)

I have a friend who owns a cute little shop on our historic town square, she and her husband just returned from a trip to NH, and VT. She said the Fall colors were absolutely breathtaking. They stayed at some B & B, and went to the Yankee Candle Factory/Store, she was amazed at how huge the place was.... commenting that they spent all day there shopping. When I read your post about the foliage, I just had to let ya know that somebody in Texas thought the trees were awesome. One of these days I hope I can make a trip up that way, and see them for myself. We've been so far as upstate NY, and DC.
Happy trails.....

Necee

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Kathy G on 11/01/02 at 16:49 (098950)

It's funny. Shortly after I posted about the foliage, I was talking to my sister and she had been outside raking. She said, 'Can you believe how dull the leaves are this year? And some of them just died on the trees after shriveling up and turning brown!' It must be a family thing!

Seriously, this year was a real diappointment to those of us who have always lived here but I'm happy to hear that some more Texans were pleased with them. We've just been spoiled by having seen how glorious they can really look when the weather conditions are perfect.

Yes, the Yankee Candle Shops are really cool. I get my votives there most of the time. We have a shop in a nearby mall. As I have said, in this part of southern NH, it is shopping heaven and we have so many stores nearby. It's too bad I'm not much of a shopper!

Hope you'll get to New England some day, too, just as I hope to get to Texas and Louisiana and Colorado and New Mexico and, well, the list just keeps on growing!

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 08:48 (098994)

I've never been to New Hampshire. Somehow, I never thought of New Hampshire as a place where there would be malls. Of course there are malls there, because it isn't the end of the earth, but that thought hadn't occurred to me.

That reminded me of something cute my daughter said when we moved from Southern California to Texas in the mid 1980's, when she was only 5. We had told her about some things in Texas that might appeal to her, but I guess it's hard to completely describe an entire state. She didn't seem distressed by all the packing, and so on, but one day shortly before the move she looked up at me and said,

'Mama, are there any little girls in Texas?'

Of course I reassured her, hugged her, and told her she would have plenty of new little friends there. It totally blew me away that she could have thought that maybe there were no little girls there and yet approached the move with such bravery and equanimity. What incredibly deep love and trust kids give us.

When we've never seen a state, it's hard to imagine that it has all the USUAL things (like little girls, and malls), as well as all the things that make that state special (like Mardi Gras here, and autumn foliage and beautiful rustic bridges and homes in New Hampshire).

I've never had a desire to travel much, but when I retire I'd like to take a few weeks in the summer and drive through some of the northern states and parts of Canada.

As a kid I spent two summers in Vermont at summer camp. The farthest north I've been in my adult life was Princeton, New Jersey, which I visited for only a couple of days in the mid 1990's to give a paper. Princeton is absolutely beautiful, with gorgeous historic homes and mansions, and beautiful trees and streams everywhere, and interesting shops. It probably costs a fortune to live there.

Carole C

Re: Carole, children say the cutest things...

Suzanne D on 11/02/02 at 09:15 (098999)

What a neat memory, Carole! And what spunk and determination your daughter showed at such an early age - sounds like she's a lot like her mother! Children indeed can come up with the best things to say...

You're right: we often have just a 'snapshot' idea about places we've never been. We think of a state or a country and one or two things we've heard about that place sticks in our mind. I imagine that when people hear the word 'Kentucky', for instance, they probably think of horses and the derby. Of course we're famous for that, but as in any state, there is so much more - and a great variety of things to experience.

I have never traveled much, but I have more of an interest to do so than I ever have. I don't know if that will happen or not, but I sure do enjoy reading about where everyone lives, what the weather is like, special celebrations, etc.

My parents visited the northeast during the first week of October on a Triple A bus tour a few years before they died. They had such a nice time and so enjoyed the fall foliage they saw. Autumn is my favorite season, and I have really loved the leaves here during the past couple of weeks. While not the most brilliant I have ever seen, they have been pretty.

Take care, and have a good weekend, everyone!
Suzanne :-)

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Kathy G on 11/02/02 at 09:20 (099002)

Carole,

Oh my, yes, Princeton is quite affluent. That's funny, too, because so many people think of waste sites, factories and general ugliness when they think of New Jersey! My son's fiance is from Jersey and she lived in a town that is just lovely. A trip down the New Jersey turnpike does nothing to enhance the state's image.

You can drive about 45 minutes from my town, and you'll be in the New Hampshire that so many people think of when you mention the state. There are quaint small towns with little centers with a few stores and all of them have the requisite church with the white steeple and brick town hall. We're located in a great part of the state. We can be in Boston in an hour and a half, be to the coast in forty-five minutes and, as I said, be to a major shopping mall and area within 35 minutes. In the meantime, although our town has grown way more than I care for in population, we still have held on to that small-town flavor and have our annual pumpkin festival, balloon festival, etc. The dump is still the place where the smart politicians campaign, especially on Saturday's.

What I find interesting is that having lived in a small town in Connecticut for years and now here in NH for most of my life, I can find very few differences. New England is New England, I guess. I mean, the small towns in Virginia and Maryland I've seen, don't look a thing like the ones in New England. I'll bet they have many of the same traditions, though.

Fascinating..

Re: Carole, children say the cutest things...

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 09:28 (099005)

Thanks, Suzanne. My daughter is such a special, wonderful person even now as an adult although she doesn't seem to know it.

You are exactly right about how I imagine Kentucky. When I think of Kentucky, I think of miles and miles of rolling deep green hilly pastures with pristine white fences and sleek racehorses, and the Kentucky Derby and all the rich people that go to it. And then, almost as an afterthought I think of Louisville which I imagine as a huge, well run city with all the modern shops and conveniences; the best of the heart of America.

I'm sure there must be a lot more to Kentucky but that is what comes to mind first. I drove through Kentucky in 1975 and again in 1977, but have never really looked around.

Carole C

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 09:41 (099011)

Your part of NH sounds like an ideal place to live. No wonder the population is increasing so! You are right about the picturesque church steeples and so on. That's part of my mental image of 'what NH must look like'. I'm not quite sure why the smart politicians would campaign at the dump on Saturdays; I guess something went right over my head. LOL

When I visited Princeton, we landed at an airport in New Jersey just across from New York City. The NYC skyline was awesome, especially since I didn't realize NYC was going to be right there at the airport, and so I thought it was New Jersey until someone clued me in. Then we drove on the turnpike down to Princeton. But during most of this I was preoccupied with other matters, and I didn't really notice much but some refineries until we arrived in Princeton.

Carole C

Re: Kentucky...

Suzanne D on 11/02/02 at 10:00 (099014)

Yes, Carole, your image is what I imagine most people have of Kentucky. Of course there are the beatiful horse farms in Lexington, and the derby in Louisville does draw all those well-dressed people - although a great percentage of them (at least the rich and famous ones) are not from our state! I've watched it on t.v. but never attended.

I grew up 100 miles south of Louisville, and for me and most of those I knew at that time, the only trips to Louisville were when someone was seriously ill and had to be taken to a large hospital. That would be where they would go, and so Louisville always in my mind was associated with Daddy's hospital stay and other grave events.

Now I live about half-way between where I grew up and Louisville, and of course I have gone for other reasons: shopping and museums and to the airport and out to eat. It is a nice, big city which I would easily get lost in as I still am a 'country girl' at heart.

Most of Kentucky that I am familiar with are the small towns and rural areas made up of family farms - fields of tobacco and corn, cows in the fields, and round bales of hay standing (used to be the little square bales). Growing up, my town might have reminded you of Mayberry from the Andy Griffith series. It has changed and grown through the years and doesn't seem much that way now. I was on the fringe of Appalachia but didn't know it at the time. Deep in the country areas of where I grew up, many old customs and sayings of the mountain people who settled there years ago remained unchanged. I was priviledged to be a part of that as well. Some of the best food I ever put in my mouth was cooked in that area, and some of the wisest people, while they may not have gone past 4th grade, lived there. From them I learned to make 'something from nothing' and 'make do' with what I had. They also taught me to appreciate the world around me and not let the fast pace of living take that away.

My school which will be closing in December has been a school for 85 years. We are having a celebration next Sunday afternoon with many coming back to visit one last time and view pictures and artifacts saved through the years. It first was an 'academy' (high school), then later a grade school building was added. For many years it held 1st - 12th grades and then later K - 8th. Most recently it has preschool through 5th grades. It is fascinating to me to see the pictures of the ballteams and graduates and old 'clunker' buses. An old army barracks was purchased at one time for use as a cafeteria. I often look around my classroom - room 106 - and wish the 'walls could talk'. I have heard there has been 3rd grade in that room, 2nd grade, 6th, a daycare, music, high school classes, you name it, I believe they have been there. A sme4 took the roof about 11 years ago, and many things have been added and changed. Just imagine the history of each of our states multiplied many times over in every community...

Well, I am going on and on and will stop now! I wish I could visit where each of you live!

Suzanne :-)

Re: Kentucky...

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 10:16 (099018)

Suzanne, thanks for the beautiful description of your home state! The part of the state where you lived as a child must have been a wonderful place to grow up. The lessons you learned there are valuable ones.

I wonder why officials always seem to think that a new school building will improve education. Your old school building sounds fascinating, and if the roof is only 11 years old I hope they don't just tear it down.

I'm sort of rambling on too. It's wonderful to be able to relax like this on Saturday mornings. :)

Carole C

Re: Kentucky...

Suzanne D on 11/02/02 at 10:29 (099021)

Thank you, Carole. I agree with you about the new buildings not always being better. We will be bigger (600 as compared to 250 students as they redistrict and consolidate). I fear that the bigness may mean more inpersonal ways in dealing with the children which I will 'fight'. Right now we know all the students in the building on a first name basis, and that has its advantages - for them as well as for us. I love the old building and am concerned about what will happen to it. RIght now we don't know. I live 1/2 mile away, and our community consists of 3 churches, 2 gas stations and stores, a post office and a school. Losing the school is a blow.

Yes, Saturday mornings are so nice when one has time to ramble! I must go now, but it has been fun!

Suzanne :-)

Re: To Carole - Re: the dump

Kathy G on 11/02/02 at 14:38 (099050)

Carole,

In my town, we do not have curbside pickup. One can hire a company to pick up, but it's very expensive. The majority of the townspeople bring their trash to the dump themselves. Excuse me, they now like to call it the Transfer Station. That's because we recycle everything we possibly can in our town, which I think is wonderful. Anyhow, the busiest time at the dump is Saturdays and Tuesdays, the days they're opened the most hours. It's a real happenin' place! We have a fellow running for Governor right now who actually spent an entire Saturday going to various towns' dumps in order to meet people. The local selectmen and people running for the state senate and house, as well as those seeking national house and senate seats always spend time at the dump and often have their workers there, passing out information.

Now doesn't THAT sound just like you'd expect it to be in New Hampshire? When I first moved here, I thought it was hilarious. Now, after 23 years, my first question of any candidate for whom I work is, 'When are you going to be at the dump?'

Re: Kentucky...

john h on 11/02/02 at 14:53 (099055)

Suzanne: I was looking at a picture of my first grade class. We had thirteen students and I remember them all. Unitl I moved away in the 8th grade we were together all the way with no new students or anyone leaving. I also remember my teacher very well Ms McComb. I also remember who I though was the prettist girl in the class- Peggy Savage.

Re: To Carole - Re: the dump

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 15:14 (099057)

Wow! That's a whole different world. Even in rural Hawaii, as well as the other seven states I've lived in, I've always had curbside pickup or at least a dumpster (when I lived in the apartment). Can you imagine the gas that is wasted by every single person making their own separate trip out to the dump? Gee. Puts recycling in a whole new light.

The dump sure sounds like a smelly place to hang around and listen to a political speech. But then, some politicians really stink!! (giggle!)

I just HAD to say that, sorry!!! This cracks me up. It was the devil in me, I just can't resist. LOL

Carole C

Re: Kentucky...

Julie on 11/02/02 at 15:56 (099070)

John, isn't Peggy the little girl whose pigtails you dipped in your inkwell?

Or have I mixed her up with some other pretty little girl?

Re: Kentucky...

john h on 11/02/02 at 17:12 (099083)

Julie: What a memory you have!!! Yes I have the broken off piece of lead still embedded in my upper arm which I can still see when Peggy let me have it. That must have been over a year ago when I mentioned that.

Re: To Carole - Re: the dump

Kathy G on 11/02/02 at 19:06 (099092)

Well, I think that because the town is so spread out, geographically, they figure it would cost the town a fortune to foot the bill because of the numbers of trucks, employees, etc. they'd need. The real reason, of course, is the tax structure in NH. If we had municipal pickup, we'd have to fund it out of our property taxes. And since we have no income or sales tax, we have one of the highest property tax rates in the country. We get almost no state aid for education so that's what eats up so much of the town's income. Anytime a new program is suggested, everyone votes against it. And for some people, like the elderly on a fixed income or those of lower income, you can't blame them. You should have seen how long it took us to get a new library. Not to mention a new school. I'm talking five years on the library and six or seven on the school.

And you know what's funny, down where the politicians hang out, it's not smelly. Of course, you figure elections are held in November and March in NH so it's not all that warm before them. But the smelly part of the dump is pretty far away from where they are. They tend to congregate right near the entrance so they can hand people information just as they pull in. But you're right; it is a good place for most of them to 'air' their views!

Re: 1st grade pictures

Suzanne D on 11/02/02 at 21:07 (099111)

John, I still have my first grade group picture as well. Not until I was an adult did I look at that picture and notice how 'poor' we all looked! But we looked happy, and I remember so many things quite distinctly from that year. I remember dropping my thermos and breaking it and crying, and then being mortified when the teacher went to get my mother who taught down the hall. I remember a little boy who always gave me his ice cream and carrying my tray down the hall, trying not to spill anything as we went back to our classroom to eat since we had no lunchroom. I remember lining up with others to get my milk carton opened.

How I would enjoy having 13 students! That would be an ideal number to work with. You must have been a close group, staying together for that number of years. Do you still stay in touch with any of them?

I enjoyed reading about your experience.

Suzanne :-)

Re: Paying for Trash pick-up

Carole C in NOLA on 11/03/02 at 08:11 (099138)

We sure get into some topics here, don't we! LOL

It didn't occur to me, but of course you are right that your cooler climate would help 'suppress the stink' of trash at the dump. Down here, trash is something you just don't want to be around for long. Politicians have to meet their constituents door to door, or down in the French Quarter, or at intersections with long traffic lights, and so on.

I can definitely relate to not wanting higher property taxes. I was so thrilled when my homestead exemption was granted last month. Our homestead exemption only covers the first $75K of the assessed price, but the taxes on the remainder are inconsequential compared with taxes in the northeast. We do have high sales taxes but trash doesn't come out of that either.

My trash pickup is on the same monthly bill with water, sewerage, mosquito control, and money for the beautiful park located in my suburb. Actually, I just looked and my twice weekly trash pick-up plus recycling costs me $16.50/month (the whole bill was $30), but then I am not in a rural or farming community where houses would be further apart. So, I can sure see the problem.

I'd really hate taking my own trash to the dump if I was an older person, though. An 80+ year old woman might have a really hard time hauling trash. It must be difficult with PF, too.

If I lived there, I'd be sorely tempted to trade in my pretty Solara for a pickup truck, that's for sure.

Carole C

Re: Peggy and the Pencil

Julie on 11/03/02 at 09:29 (099151)

It was unforgettable, John!

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

nancy s. on 11/03/02 at 09:37 (099152)

was she the one who threw rocks at you?
.

Re: 1st grade pictures

john h on 11/03/02 at 11:27 (099159)

Sandly Suzanne I moved from the little rural mountain town of Murphy, N.C. to the big bad city of Chicago and lost contact with the class, I recently read a history of Cherokee County, N.C. and saw the names of several of my classmates who helped put this book togethher. My grandparents came from a nearby town named Hanging Dog. How is that for a name. The name came about when the Cherokee's would get mad with the locals for infringing on their land and they would proceed to hang their dog if they had one and hang it in the front yard.

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

john h on 11/03/02 at 11:47 (099166)

Darn Nancy: Now someone remembers Betty Greenwood and the rock throwing incident. You guys just do not forget! Did I tell you we were playing spin the bottle after which Betty let go with that rock to the head. Betty got what was coming to her at one point because in the 7th grade Mr. Lovingood paddled the fool out of Betty for something. Yes the girls got paddled as well as the boys only not as hard.

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

nancy s. on 11/03/02 at 18:08 (099200)

mr lovingood paddled people? isn't there an oxymoron in there somewhere?

what exactly did you do during spin-the-bottle that inspired betty to hurl a rock? inquiring minds want to know.

nancy
.

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

john h on 11/07/02 at 10:52 (099562)

Nancy: I cannot really remember what I did to cause that rock to be thrown. Maybe that was Betty's way of showing affection like when my cat bites me. Did you ever play spin the bootle? Our method (we were around 10 years old) was a boy or girl would spin the bottle while sitting in a circle on the floor and who ever it pointed to (had to be opposite sex) you got to go into closet (yes a closet) and kiss the fair damsel. Was that exciting or what. .

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

nancy s. on 11/07/02 at 14:42 (099587)

john, of course i played spin-the-bottle, although we never went into A CLOSET to carry out the deed, you impassioned chickens. we just did it right there on the floor in front of everyone (i mean kiss, while sitting on the floor!)

i never had a good time, because billy mcclintock always made sure he got the bottle to spin toward me and gave me a smooch, when i actually had a crush on his brother peter. i hope they're not reading this. their feet seemed fine in the late 1950s.

soon i'll be reporting on Moon Pies, as sent to me by necee along with a lovely picture of her and her antiques -- i just have to wait for my teeth to calm down after a 4-hour 2-crown dental appointment yesterday ($2200 out of pocket, but who's counting).

nancy
.

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

wendyn on 10/31/02 at 07:19 (098772)

My pumpkins are stinking up the basement. If we put them outside they would melt in -20C (-6F) weather.

Peeeyeeeew!!!!

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Carole C in NOLA on 10/31/02 at 07:30 (098774)

It got down to 60 here last night! I love this brisk and cool weather, and the humidity is down too. No freezes predicted here.

Also, it was daylight when I drove to work this morning at 5:45, and the skies were still bright pink with sunrise. This early daylight was probably an effect of the time change that was masked previously due to the rains. :)

Carole C

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Carole C in NOLA on 10/31/02 at 07:46 (098775)

I haven't seen a basement since 1965. We can't have them here, because they would just fill up with water.

I can't stand it. I've tried really hard not to join in the units conversion stuff.

32 - [20C * (212-32)/(100-0)] = -4 F

Right? Or did I miss some oddness about Canadian temperature measurements?

Carole C

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

wendyn on 10/31/02 at 09:00 (098791)

http://pubweb.northwestern.edu/~hsl700/Fah.html

Here is a site for conversion,

-20 C is -4F

-6F is -21 C

Close.

Either way, it's freakin cold.

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Carole C in NOLA on 10/31/02 at 10:31 (098803)

Actually, if you re-read the posts, my conversion was exactly what your site says.... nobody else's matched. Which was why I finally HAD to post. I just couldn't stand it.

Carole C

Re: ****Frost on the Pumpkin****

Richard, C.Ped on 10/31/02 at 11:27 (098809)

Thats freakin freezin! Freakin cold to us southerners is 50 degrees F. LOL
Richard, C.Ped

Re: Speaking of pumpkins...Happy Halloween!

Suzanne D on 10/31/02 at 16:00 (098826)

There is a real nip to the air here in Kentucky - just right for Halloween! We had high temperatures in the 40's yesterday and the 50's today. I am about ready to go light my jack-o'-lantern for our trick-or-treaters. I enjoy having many of my students stop by. They really think they are fooling me as they burst forth with, 'Guess who I am?!' and I pretend to be surprised!

Have a good evening, everyone.
Suzanne :-)

Re: Speaking of pumpkins...Happy Halloween!

Kathy G on 11/01/02 at 09:33 (098889)

Hope you all survived the trick or treaters! It's cold this year and we had a lot of kids turn up wearing coats and gloves. I make it a rule not to comment specifically on anyone's costume unless I 'm actually sure I know what they are but I blew it with one little girl last night. She was exceptionally pretty and I said to her, 'Oh, you look just beautiful!' She looked at me, and with great exasperation exclaimed, 'I'm a VAMPIRE!' I told her she was the prettiest vampire I'd ever seen! She really was - I thought she was a princess dressed in black. I guess her mother's idea of a vampire and mine are totally different!

Carole, I get such a kick out of you calling 60 brisk! What a difference from our climate! We've been having cold weather, even for NH. Nighttime temperatures have been dropping to the thirties and the daytimes are about 10-15 degrees (Farenheit!) lower than usual. We've already had a snowfall of about an inch. I think it was on the 23rd. We haven't had snow that early since 1979. I think we may be in for a long winter. My husband golfed yesterday and figured it was his final round. Seeing as he was wearing his winter jacket and the forecast for tomorrow is windy with windchill factors in the low thirties, I had to agree! For the last 8 or 10 years, he's been able to golf right up to Thanksgiving. Maybe we're going back to our old weather patterns but I don't think anyone knows for sure.

The foliage was quite muted this year due to the lack of summer rains but a friend had folks visit from Texas and they thought it was glorious. I guess it's all what you're used to. We have 2 Catalpa trees in our yard, much to my husband's sorrow, and one of them still hasn't dropped its leaves and it looks dreadful. They have very large leaves and they don't turn colors, they just shrivel up and die and then take weeks to actually drop. And then, of course, they still have to drop their beans after that. I love them because the flowers are so fragrant and they look so neat. I've always thought he was just humoring me by not getting them cut down, but this year, I told him that maybe we should replace them with less messy trees. He never attempted to hire anyone to cut them down so maybe he thinks they're pretty, too. But with the early turn in the weather and no Indian Summer in sight, he may be out there in the snow cleaning up their leaves. He'll probably forget how pretty they are in the summer and I suspect they'll be gone by next year!

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Necee on 11/01/02 at 12:56 (098916)

I have a friend who owns a cute little shop on our historic town square, she and her husband just returned from a trip to NH, and VT. She said the Fall colors were absolutely breathtaking. They stayed at some B & B, and went to the Yankee Candle Factory/Store, she was amazed at how huge the place was.... commenting that they spent all day there shopping. When I read your post about the foliage, I just had to let ya know that somebody in Texas thought the trees were awesome. One of these days I hope I can make a trip up that way, and see them for myself. We've been so far as upstate NY, and DC.
Happy trails.....

Necee

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Kathy G on 11/01/02 at 16:49 (098950)

It's funny. Shortly after I posted about the foliage, I was talking to my sister and she had been outside raking. She said, 'Can you believe how dull the leaves are this year? And some of them just died on the trees after shriveling up and turning brown!' It must be a family thing!

Seriously, this year was a real diappointment to those of us who have always lived here but I'm happy to hear that some more Texans were pleased with them. We've just been spoiled by having seen how glorious they can really look when the weather conditions are perfect.

Yes, the Yankee Candle Shops are really cool. I get my votives there most of the time. We have a shop in a nearby mall. As I have said, in this part of southern NH, it is shopping heaven and we have so many stores nearby. It's too bad I'm not much of a shopper!

Hope you'll get to New England some day, too, just as I hope to get to Texas and Louisiana and Colorado and New Mexico and, well, the list just keeps on growing!

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 08:48 (098994)

I've never been to New Hampshire. Somehow, I never thought of New Hampshire as a place where there would be malls. Of course there are malls there, because it isn't the end of the earth, but that thought hadn't occurred to me.

That reminded me of something cute my daughter said when we moved from Southern California to Texas in the mid 1980's, when she was only 5. We had told her about some things in Texas that might appeal to her, but I guess it's hard to completely describe an entire state. She didn't seem distressed by all the packing, and so on, but one day shortly before the move she looked up at me and said,

'Mama, are there any little girls in Texas?'

Of course I reassured her, hugged her, and told her she would have plenty of new little friends there. It totally blew me away that she could have thought that maybe there were no little girls there and yet approached the move with such bravery and equanimity. What incredibly deep love and trust kids give us.

When we've never seen a state, it's hard to imagine that it has all the USUAL things (like little girls, and malls), as well as all the things that make that state special (like Mardi Gras here, and autumn foliage and beautiful rustic bridges and homes in New Hampshire).

I've never had a desire to travel much, but when I retire I'd like to take a few weeks in the summer and drive through some of the northern states and parts of Canada.

As a kid I spent two summers in Vermont at summer camp. The farthest north I've been in my adult life was Princeton, New Jersey, which I visited for only a couple of days in the mid 1990's to give a paper. Princeton is absolutely beautiful, with gorgeous historic homes and mansions, and beautiful trees and streams everywhere, and interesting shops. It probably costs a fortune to live there.

Carole C

Re: Carole, children say the cutest things...

Suzanne D on 11/02/02 at 09:15 (098999)

What a neat memory, Carole! And what spunk and determination your daughter showed at such an early age - sounds like she's a lot like her mother! Children indeed can come up with the best things to say...

You're right: we often have just a 'snapshot' idea about places we've never been. We think of a state or a country and one or two things we've heard about that place sticks in our mind. I imagine that when people hear the word 'Kentucky', for instance, they probably think of horses and the derby. Of course we're famous for that, but as in any state, there is so much more - and a great variety of things to experience.

I have never traveled much, but I have more of an interest to do so than I ever have. I don't know if that will happen or not, but I sure do enjoy reading about where everyone lives, what the weather is like, special celebrations, etc.

My parents visited the northeast during the first week of October on a Triple A bus tour a few years before they died. They had such a nice time and so enjoyed the fall foliage they saw. Autumn is my favorite season, and I have really loved the leaves here during the past couple of weeks. While not the most brilliant I have ever seen, they have been pretty.

Take care, and have a good weekend, everyone!
Suzanne :-)

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Kathy G on 11/02/02 at 09:20 (099002)

Carole,

Oh my, yes, Princeton is quite affluent. That's funny, too, because so many people think of waste sites, factories and general ugliness when they think of New Jersey! My son's fiance is from Jersey and she lived in a town that is just lovely. A trip down the New Jersey turnpike does nothing to enhance the state's image.

You can drive about 45 minutes from my town, and you'll be in the New Hampshire that so many people think of when you mention the state. There are quaint small towns with little centers with a few stores and all of them have the requisite church with the white steeple and brick town hall. We're located in a great part of the state. We can be in Boston in an hour and a half, be to the coast in forty-five minutes and, as I said, be to a major shopping mall and area within 35 minutes. In the meantime, although our town has grown way more than I care for in population, we still have held on to that small-town flavor and have our annual pumpkin festival, balloon festival, etc. The dump is still the place where the smart politicians campaign, especially on Saturday's.

What I find interesting is that having lived in a small town in Connecticut for years and now here in NH for most of my life, I can find very few differences. New England is New England, I guess. I mean, the small towns in Virginia and Maryland I've seen, don't look a thing like the ones in New England. I'll bet they have many of the same traditions, though.

Fascinating..

Re: Carole, children say the cutest things...

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 09:28 (099005)

Thanks, Suzanne. My daughter is such a special, wonderful person even now as an adult although she doesn't seem to know it.

You are exactly right about how I imagine Kentucky. When I think of Kentucky, I think of miles and miles of rolling deep green hilly pastures with pristine white fences and sleek racehorses, and the Kentucky Derby and all the rich people that go to it. And then, almost as an afterthought I think of Louisville which I imagine as a huge, well run city with all the modern shops and conveniences; the best of the heart of America.

I'm sure there must be a lot more to Kentucky but that is what comes to mind first. I drove through Kentucky in 1975 and again in 1977, but have never really looked around.

Carole C

Re: To: Kathy G. Re: Fall foliage

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 09:41 (099011)

Your part of NH sounds like an ideal place to live. No wonder the population is increasing so! You are right about the picturesque church steeples and so on. That's part of my mental image of 'what NH must look like'. I'm not quite sure why the smart politicians would campaign at the dump on Saturdays; I guess something went right over my head. LOL

When I visited Princeton, we landed at an airport in New Jersey just across from New York City. The NYC skyline was awesome, especially since I didn't realize NYC was going to be right there at the airport, and so I thought it was New Jersey until someone clued me in. Then we drove on the turnpike down to Princeton. But during most of this I was preoccupied with other matters, and I didn't really notice much but some refineries until we arrived in Princeton.

Carole C

Re: Kentucky...

Suzanne D on 11/02/02 at 10:00 (099014)

Yes, Carole, your image is what I imagine most people have of Kentucky. Of course there are the beatiful horse farms in Lexington, and the derby in Louisville does draw all those well-dressed people - although a great percentage of them (at least the rich and famous ones) are not from our state! I've watched it on t.v. but never attended.

I grew up 100 miles south of Louisville, and for me and most of those I knew at that time, the only trips to Louisville were when someone was seriously ill and had to be taken to a large hospital. That would be where they would go, and so Louisville always in my mind was associated with Daddy's hospital stay and other grave events.

Now I live about half-way between where I grew up and Louisville, and of course I have gone for other reasons: shopping and museums and to the airport and out to eat. It is a nice, big city which I would easily get lost in as I still am a 'country girl' at heart.

Most of Kentucky that I am familiar with are the small towns and rural areas made up of family farms - fields of tobacco and corn, cows in the fields, and round bales of hay standing (used to be the little square bales). Growing up, my town might have reminded you of Mayberry from the Andy Griffith series. It has changed and grown through the years and doesn't seem much that way now. I was on the fringe of Appalachia but didn't know it at the time. Deep in the country areas of where I grew up, many old customs and sayings of the mountain people who settled there years ago remained unchanged. I was priviledged to be a part of that as well. Some of the best food I ever put in my mouth was cooked in that area, and some of the wisest people, while they may not have gone past 4th grade, lived there. From them I learned to make 'something from nothing' and 'make do' with what I had. They also taught me to appreciate the world around me and not let the fast pace of living take that away.

My school which will be closing in December has been a school for 85 years. We are having a celebration next Sunday afternoon with many coming back to visit one last time and view pictures and artifacts saved through the years. It first was an 'academy' (high school), then later a grade school building was added. For many years it held 1st - 12th grades and then later K - 8th. Most recently it has preschool through 5th grades. It is fascinating to me to see the pictures of the ballteams and graduates and old 'clunker' buses. An old army barracks was purchased at one time for use as a cafeteria. I often look around my classroom - room 106 - and wish the 'walls could talk'. I have heard there has been 3rd grade in that room, 2nd grade, 6th, a daycare, music, high school classes, you name it, I believe they have been there. A sme4 took the roof about 11 years ago, and many things have been added and changed. Just imagine the history of each of our states multiplied many times over in every community...

Well, I am going on and on and will stop now! I wish I could visit where each of you live!

Suzanne :-)

Re: Kentucky...

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 10:16 (099018)

Suzanne, thanks for the beautiful description of your home state! The part of the state where you lived as a child must have been a wonderful place to grow up. The lessons you learned there are valuable ones.

I wonder why officials always seem to think that a new school building will improve education. Your old school building sounds fascinating, and if the roof is only 11 years old I hope they don't just tear it down.

I'm sort of rambling on too. It's wonderful to be able to relax like this on Saturday mornings. :)

Carole C

Re: Kentucky...

Suzanne D on 11/02/02 at 10:29 (099021)

Thank you, Carole. I agree with you about the new buildings not always being better. We will be bigger (600 as compared to 250 students as they redistrict and consolidate). I fear that the bigness may mean more inpersonal ways in dealing with the children which I will 'fight'. Right now we know all the students in the building on a first name basis, and that has its advantages - for them as well as for us. I love the old building and am concerned about what will happen to it. RIght now we don't know. I live 1/2 mile away, and our community consists of 3 churches, 2 gas stations and stores, a post office and a school. Losing the school is a blow.

Yes, Saturday mornings are so nice when one has time to ramble! I must go now, but it has been fun!

Suzanne :-)

Re: To Carole - Re: the dump

Kathy G on 11/02/02 at 14:38 (099050)

Carole,

In my town, we do not have curbside pickup. One can hire a company to pick up, but it's very expensive. The majority of the townspeople bring their trash to the dump themselves. Excuse me, they now like to call it the Transfer Station. That's because we recycle everything we possibly can in our town, which I think is wonderful. Anyhow, the busiest time at the dump is Saturdays and Tuesdays, the days they're opened the most hours. It's a real happenin' place! We have a fellow running for Governor right now who actually spent an entire Saturday going to various towns' dumps in order to meet people. The local selectmen and people running for the state senate and house, as well as those seeking national house and senate seats always spend time at the dump and often have their workers there, passing out information.

Now doesn't THAT sound just like you'd expect it to be in New Hampshire? When I first moved here, I thought it was hilarious. Now, after 23 years, my first question of any candidate for whom I work is, 'When are you going to be at the dump?'

Re: Kentucky...

john h on 11/02/02 at 14:53 (099055)

Suzanne: I was looking at a picture of my first grade class. We had thirteen students and I remember them all. Unitl I moved away in the 8th grade we were together all the way with no new students or anyone leaving. I also remember my teacher very well Ms McComb. I also remember who I though was the prettist girl in the class- Peggy Savage.

Re: To Carole - Re: the dump

Carole C in NOLA on 11/02/02 at 15:14 (099057)

Wow! That's a whole different world. Even in rural Hawaii, as well as the other seven states I've lived in, I've always had curbside pickup or at least a dumpster (when I lived in the apartment). Can you imagine the gas that is wasted by every single person making their own separate trip out to the dump? Gee. Puts recycling in a whole new light.

The dump sure sounds like a smelly place to hang around and listen to a political speech. But then, some politicians really stink!! (giggle!)

I just HAD to say that, sorry!!! This cracks me up. It was the devil in me, I just can't resist. LOL

Carole C

Re: Kentucky...

Julie on 11/02/02 at 15:56 (099070)

John, isn't Peggy the little girl whose pigtails you dipped in your inkwell?

Or have I mixed her up with some other pretty little girl?

Re: Kentucky...

john h on 11/02/02 at 17:12 (099083)

Julie: What a memory you have!!! Yes I have the broken off piece of lead still embedded in my upper arm which I can still see when Peggy let me have it. That must have been over a year ago when I mentioned that.

Re: To Carole - Re: the dump

Kathy G on 11/02/02 at 19:06 (099092)

Well, I think that because the town is so spread out, geographically, they figure it would cost the town a fortune to foot the bill because of the numbers of trucks, employees, etc. they'd need. The real reason, of course, is the tax structure in NH. If we had municipal pickup, we'd have to fund it out of our property taxes. And since we have no income or sales tax, we have one of the highest property tax rates in the country. We get almost no state aid for education so that's what eats up so much of the town's income. Anytime a new program is suggested, everyone votes against it. And for some people, like the elderly on a fixed income or those of lower income, you can't blame them. You should have seen how long it took us to get a new library. Not to mention a new school. I'm talking five years on the library and six or seven on the school.

And you know what's funny, down where the politicians hang out, it's not smelly. Of course, you figure elections are held in November and March in NH so it's not all that warm before them. But the smelly part of the dump is pretty far away from where they are. They tend to congregate right near the entrance so they can hand people information just as they pull in. But you're right; it is a good place for most of them to 'air' their views!

Re: 1st grade pictures

Suzanne D on 11/02/02 at 21:07 (099111)

John, I still have my first grade group picture as well. Not until I was an adult did I look at that picture and notice how 'poor' we all looked! But we looked happy, and I remember so many things quite distinctly from that year. I remember dropping my thermos and breaking it and crying, and then being mortified when the teacher went to get my mother who taught down the hall. I remember a little boy who always gave me his ice cream and carrying my tray down the hall, trying not to spill anything as we went back to our classroom to eat since we had no lunchroom. I remember lining up with others to get my milk carton opened.

How I would enjoy having 13 students! That would be an ideal number to work with. You must have been a close group, staying together for that number of years. Do you still stay in touch with any of them?

I enjoyed reading about your experience.

Suzanne :-)

Re: Paying for Trash pick-up

Carole C in NOLA on 11/03/02 at 08:11 (099138)

We sure get into some topics here, don't we! LOL

It didn't occur to me, but of course you are right that your cooler climate would help 'suppress the stink' of trash at the dump. Down here, trash is something you just don't want to be around for long. Politicians have to meet their constituents door to door, or down in the French Quarter, or at intersections with long traffic lights, and so on.

I can definitely relate to not wanting higher property taxes. I was so thrilled when my homestead exemption was granted last month. Our homestead exemption only covers the first $75K of the assessed price, but the taxes on the remainder are inconsequential compared with taxes in the northeast. We do have high sales taxes but trash doesn't come out of that either.

My trash pickup is on the same monthly bill with water, sewerage, mosquito control, and money for the beautiful park located in my suburb. Actually, I just looked and my twice weekly trash pick-up plus recycling costs me $16.50/month (the whole bill was $30), but then I am not in a rural or farming community where houses would be further apart. So, I can sure see the problem.

I'd really hate taking my own trash to the dump if I was an older person, though. An 80+ year old woman might have a really hard time hauling trash. It must be difficult with PF, too.

If I lived there, I'd be sorely tempted to trade in my pretty Solara for a pickup truck, that's for sure.

Carole C

Re: Peggy and the Pencil

Julie on 11/03/02 at 09:29 (099151)

It was unforgettable, John!

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

nancy s. on 11/03/02 at 09:37 (099152)

was she the one who threw rocks at you?
.

Re: 1st grade pictures

john h on 11/03/02 at 11:27 (099159)

Sandly Suzanne I moved from the little rural mountain town of Murphy, N.C. to the big bad city of Chicago and lost contact with the class, I recently read a history of Cherokee County, N.C. and saw the names of several of my classmates who helped put this book togethher. My grandparents came from a nearby town named Hanging Dog. How is that for a name. The name came about when the Cherokee's would get mad with the locals for infringing on their land and they would proceed to hang their dog if they had one and hang it in the front yard.

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

john h on 11/03/02 at 11:47 (099166)

Darn Nancy: Now someone remembers Betty Greenwood and the rock throwing incident. You guys just do not forget! Did I tell you we were playing spin the bottle after which Betty let go with that rock to the head. Betty got what was coming to her at one point because in the 7th grade Mr. Lovingood paddled the fool out of Betty for something. Yes the girls got paddled as well as the boys only not as hard.

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

nancy s. on 11/03/02 at 18:08 (099200)

mr lovingood paddled people? isn't there an oxymoron in there somewhere?

what exactly did you do during spin-the-bottle that inspired betty to hurl a rock? inquiring minds want to know.

nancy
.

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

john h on 11/07/02 at 10:52 (099562)

Nancy: I cannot really remember what I did to cause that rock to be thrown. Maybe that was Betty's way of showing affection like when my cat bites me. Did you ever play spin the bootle? Our method (we were around 10 years old) was a boy or girl would spin the bottle while sitting in a circle on the floor and who ever it pointed to (had to be opposite sex) you got to go into closet (yes a closet) and kiss the fair damsel. Was that exciting or what. .

Re: Kentucky... john, then who was betty greenwood?

nancy s. on 11/07/02 at 14:42 (099587)

john, of course i played spin-the-bottle, although we never went into A CLOSET to carry out the deed, you impassioned chickens. we just did it right there on the floor in front of everyone (i mean kiss, while sitting on the floor!)

i never had a good time, because billy mcclintock always made sure he got the bottle to spin toward me and gave me a smooch, when i actually had a crush on his brother peter. i hope they're not reading this. their feet seemed fine in the late 1950s.

soon i'll be reporting on Moon Pies, as sent to me by necee along with a lovely picture of her and her antiques -- i just have to wait for my teeth to calm down after a 4-hour 2-crown dental appointment yesterday ($2200 out of pocket, but who's counting).

nancy
.