Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Misdiagnosis

Posted by Pete on 11/02/02 at 09:31 (099007)

I live in the UK and have been posting here for some 6 months. Having been diagnosed by 4 other pods with PF and I have now had 2 more recent diagnosis which say I do NOT have pf. One of the lastest 2 was a 'top' foot and ankle surgeon who says I don't have pf, heel pad atrophy or nerve entrapement. He reckons it is 'merely' a biomechanical problem and has made an appointment for me to see a biomechanical / gate analysis assessment in Oswestry. The pod I saw recently concurs with his views.

Time will tell who is right but it does make you think how many people are saddled with an incorrect pf diagnosis and may have surgery as a result ?

This maybe the reason why all conservative measures, taping, ESWT, stretching, icing etc haven't worked for me.

Re: Misdiagnosis

BrianG on 11/02/02 at 09:39 (099009)

Pete, your correct. Too many people get talked into surgery before ALL conservative measures have been taken. Knowing what I now know, I wouldn't have surgery, unless I was on the brink of suicide. I feel lucky that my failed EPF resulted in no additional pain or nerve damage. I think that if every doctor carefully explained all the possible problems that could occur, much less surgery would be done these days. Unfortunatly that doesn't always happen.

Regards
BrianG

Re: Misdiagnosis

Dr. Z on 11/02/02 at 10:02 (099015)

Hi Pete,

What kind of biomechanical problem do they think you have.? Biomechanical problem such as excessive pronation, difference in leg lenght are just a few that can contribute or cause plantar fasciits. Good luck and let us know what they find. I would recommend trying the power step inserts to see if they help in anyway. This insert can reduce excessive pronation depending on the serverity that you have

Re: Misdiagnosis

Lara T on 11/02/02 at 10:29 (099023)

My 2nd podiatrist said it was a biomechanical problem too, and after relief from industrial level taping (the kind that you could tolerate for diagnostic purposes but would be a crazy-maker to live with 24/7/365) and subsequent orthotics, any remaining pain was in my head. (The first podiatrist said it was probably the first sign of diabetes - which ignores the fact that foot nerve pain in diabetes is caused by the excess sugar so it couldn't have been a preliminary sign if my blood work was coming back negative for diabetes. At least she figured out it was nerve pain and not in my head - for all the good it did). The third podiatrist diagnosed Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome and conservative treatments have worked well.

Good luck.

Re: Misdiagnosis

john h on 11/05/02 at 09:41 (099406)

Brian: When I first developed PF I went to a Doctor for the 1st visit. After talking to him for about 10 minutes and him reviewing my foot x-rays he wanted to perform bilaterial PF on both feet with an endoscope and place artificial joints in both great toes for hallux rigids (actually I had hallux limitus as I had cartlidge in those toes). He said we could do it all in one surgery and I would be back to running within a few months. Having almost zero knowledge about PF and artifical joints I actually considered that but after some internet exploration and visit with another Doctor I quickly retreated as fast as possible from this Doctor. He said I had no cartlidge in the two toes when in fact I had plenty of cartlidge and a cheilectomy quickly repaired one of my toes. You wonder how many people are sucked in to such medical procedures?

Re: Misdiagnosis

john h on 11/05/02 at 09:46 (099407)

Dr. Z: Since developing PF many years ago I have paid particular attention to how people walk. At the health club track when walking behind people for several laps you really get a good idea of how their feet strike the floor. I observe many people who over pronate so much they appear to be walking on the side of there feet. Others seem to almost walk on their toes. Actually what would seem to be an ideal foot strike is rarely observed. The over pronation seems more common than the normal foot strike.This seems to ask the question of how much does over pronation play in PF?

Re: Misdiagnosis

BrianG on 11/02/02 at 09:39 (099009)

Pete, your correct. Too many people get talked into surgery before ALL conservative measures have been taken. Knowing what I now know, I wouldn't have surgery, unless I was on the brink of suicide. I feel lucky that my failed EPF resulted in no additional pain or nerve damage. I think that if every doctor carefully explained all the possible problems that could occur, much less surgery would be done these days. Unfortunatly that doesn't always happen.

Regards
BrianG

Re: Misdiagnosis

Dr. Z on 11/02/02 at 10:02 (099015)

Hi Pete,

What kind of biomechanical problem do they think you have.? Biomechanical problem such as excessive pronation, difference in leg lenght are just a few that can contribute or cause plantar fasciits. Good luck and let us know what they find. I would recommend trying the power step inserts to see if they help in anyway. This insert can reduce excessive pronation depending on the serverity that you have

Re: Misdiagnosis

Lara T on 11/02/02 at 10:29 (099023)

My 2nd podiatrist said it was a biomechanical problem too, and after relief from industrial level taping (the kind that you could tolerate for diagnostic purposes but would be a crazy-maker to live with 24/7/365) and subsequent orthotics, any remaining pain was in my head. (The first podiatrist said it was probably the first sign of diabetes - which ignores the fact that foot nerve pain in diabetes is caused by the excess sugar so it couldn't have been a preliminary sign if my blood work was coming back negative for diabetes. At least she figured out it was nerve pain and not in my head - for all the good it did). The third podiatrist diagnosed Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome and conservative treatments have worked well.

Good luck.

Re: Misdiagnosis

john h on 11/05/02 at 09:41 (099406)

Brian: When I first developed PF I went to a Doctor for the 1st visit. After talking to him for about 10 minutes and him reviewing my foot x-rays he wanted to perform bilaterial PF on both feet with an endoscope and place artificial joints in both great toes for hallux rigids (actually I had hallux limitus as I had cartlidge in those toes). He said we could do it all in one surgery and I would be back to running within a few months. Having almost zero knowledge about PF and artifical joints I actually considered that but after some internet exploration and visit with another Doctor I quickly retreated as fast as possible from this Doctor. He said I had no cartlidge in the two toes when in fact I had plenty of cartlidge and a cheilectomy quickly repaired one of my toes. You wonder how many people are sucked in to such medical procedures?

Re: Misdiagnosis

john h on 11/05/02 at 09:46 (099407)

Dr. Z: Since developing PF many years ago I have paid particular attention to how people walk. At the health club track when walking behind people for several laps you really get a good idea of how their feet strike the floor. I observe many people who over pronate so much they appear to be walking on the side of there feet. Others seem to almost walk on their toes. Actually what would seem to be an ideal foot strike is rarely observed. The over pronation seems more common than the normal foot strike.This seems to ask the question of how much does over pronation play in PF?