Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

osteopathy

Posted by janet m on 11/12/02 at 04:21 (099848)

It's been nearly two years since I visited the heelspurs messsage board. Why? Because I don't suffer any more. After trying shoe inserts o.t.c., specially made prothesis, splints,hot-cold water, treatments, excercising stretches and whatever... I don't even remember it all...it occurred to me that I have had these spurs (which the docs say are 'absolutely incredible in dimension- they must be removed!') since I was 28 years old or longer. 28 is when I was first diagnosed. I quickly changed jobs and since I was on my feet much less the pain gradually receded and I forgot about them, until a few years ago when it got so bad I was crawling up and down the stairs in the morning.
So if for fifteen or twenty years (I'm fifty now) it wasb't so bad it couldn't be the bony growth in itself causing all the pain could it? It's always been there. So I went to an osteopath, a british trained osteopath, which is quite different to the pseudo-osteos in USA or the rest of Europe. After a few treatments to resolve a slight twist in the legs I was walking fairly well again and I continued for ten weeks of treatments..gentle but sure to bring the lower skeleton into balance. During this time pain never recurred. Since then I've had treatments to finish the job of adjusting spinal posture, neck and arms...every six weeks or so and I continue absolutely pain free no matter what kind of 'abuse' my feet take.
So If you know a good osteopath, it's worth the time and expense to rebalance you entire skeletal system and posture. I have had no pain in any part of my body in eight months, and at my age and life style that is impressive. The other docs say 'how can osteopathic adjustment possibly cur heelspur pain?' but don't dare saying it was all in my mind because they saw the x-rays. Take a look and care for your whole body! You'll be glad you did.

Re: osteopathy

Sharon W on 11/12/02 at 07:48 (099856)

Wow, what a wonderful story! I suspect that for MANY of us, our posture and the way we walk and the way our skeleton is balanced is an important factor in our foot problmes, and I'm very glad that the osteopath was able to end your suffering!!

Congratulations, and continued good health to you!

Sharon

Re: osteopathy

Dr. Zuckerman on 11/12/02 at 07:51 (099858)

Many cases of heel pain can be from lower extremity mal-alignmet . Great. Make sure you follow up with spinal adjustment treatment and or evaluations. You didn't just get out of alignment it could be your structure

Re: osteopathy

Julie on 11/12/02 at 07:54 (099859)

Thanks, Janet, for posting this. I'm a fan of osteopathy too (in fact it was my osteopath who pointed me in the direction of her podiatrist when my PF appeared suspiciously soon after a minor back injury). I was interested in your description of yours, whom you say is 'British trained, which is quite different to the pseudo-osteos in USA or the rest of Europe'.

I didn't realise that osteopathic training in the USA is different from here (I live in England), but that could explain why some of my past posts about osteopathy were greeted with polite disbelief and the odd debunking.

What's the difference? I assume you live in the States, so perhaps you know? The training in Britain IS very good: it's a four-year full time course. One of my yoga students is doing it now, and what I hear from her about it is impressive. Here, osteopathy is mainstream: it's accepted by medical doctors who are more and more giving referrals for structural problems, and it's regulated.

I'm glad you found the help you needed. Foot problems are often related to spinal problems (my podiatrist believes they mostly are) and I hope your post, a reminder that no-one is just a pair of sore feet in isolation, will encourage others to think about their bodies as a whole, and perhaps seek out good holistic treatment. Osteopathy helped me too, acupuncture has helped Wendy and others, homeopathy has helped Nancy S, kinesiology has helped Carmen. No treatment can be guaranteed, of course, but the complementary therapies, in the right hands, are worth a try.

Thanks again for your post, and welcome back.

Re: osteopathy

Kathy G on 11/12/02 at 13:37 (099894)

Janet,

What an encouraging story! I'm so pleased for you. Here in my part of the country (NH), for the most part, our osteopaths are all Primary Care Physicians and the insurance companies refuse to pay them for osteopathic treatment. Most of them just don't have the time to do them, even if one is willing to pay cash for the treatment. It is most disheartening as I have gone to an osteopath since I was about eighteen years old and believe heartily in their effectiveness. When my osteopath retired and I couldn't find another one, I found a wonderful chiropractor who was almost as good. Alas, he passed away. Then I found a great osteopath who was about 45 minutes away from my home but he, too, passed away. (Are we seeing a pattern here?) Anyhow, since his passing, the only one I've found turned out to be, well let's be kind and say, an extremist who believed in some rather outlandish treatment. So, I now go to a chiropractor. He is good and probably comes close to doing osteopathic manipulation but he's still not an osteopath. He was the one who first massaged my calf when I was experiencing such discomfort and since that time, my husband has been willing to massage the area. He's sharp and knows when to send me to my doctor and he doesn't keep people coming back for appointment after appointment. He, unfortunately, doesn't seem to think he can help my foot problems.

Thanks for putting in a good word for Osteopaths as I don't think we mention them very often on these boards and they can be wonderful.

Re: osteopathy

Ed Davis, DPM on 11/14/02 at 23:45 (100212)

Janet:

A very informative story. Osteopaths in the US tried so hard to be recognized as MD's that they set aside a lot of their knowledge of manipulative medicine. Some are now trying to get back to their 'roots.'

An osteopath with a strong interest in feet named Hiss had a clinic in Los Angeles during the 40's, 50's and 60's in which he treated as many as 100 patients per day with foot problems using primarily manipulative techniques. Few podiatrists wanted to follow his lead. One exception was Rue Tikker, DPM, now retired an living in Napa, CA. Rue is offering courses in Hiss' osteopathic manipulation techniques of the foot to all who are interested. I took his course about 3 years ago and encourage others to do the same.
Ed

Re: osteopathy

Sharon W on 11/12/02 at 07:48 (099856)

Wow, what a wonderful story! I suspect that for MANY of us, our posture and the way we walk and the way our skeleton is balanced is an important factor in our foot problmes, and I'm very glad that the osteopath was able to end your suffering!!

Congratulations, and continued good health to you!

Sharon

Re: osteopathy

Dr. Zuckerman on 11/12/02 at 07:51 (099858)

Many cases of heel pain can be from lower extremity mal-alignmet . Great. Make sure you follow up with spinal adjustment treatment and or evaluations. You didn't just get out of alignment it could be your structure

Re: osteopathy

Julie on 11/12/02 at 07:54 (099859)

Thanks, Janet, for posting this. I'm a fan of osteopathy too (in fact it was my osteopath who pointed me in the direction of her podiatrist when my PF appeared suspiciously soon after a minor back injury). I was interested in your description of yours, whom you say is 'British trained, which is quite different to the pseudo-osteos in USA or the rest of Europe'.

I didn't realise that osteopathic training in the USA is different from here (I live in England), but that could explain why some of my past posts about osteopathy were greeted with polite disbelief and the odd debunking.

What's the difference? I assume you live in the States, so perhaps you know? The training in Britain IS very good: it's a four-year full time course. One of my yoga students is doing it now, and what I hear from her about it is impressive. Here, osteopathy is mainstream: it's accepted by medical doctors who are more and more giving referrals for structural problems, and it's regulated.

I'm glad you found the help you needed. Foot problems are often related to spinal problems (my podiatrist believes they mostly are) and I hope your post, a reminder that no-one is just a pair of sore feet in isolation, will encourage others to think about their bodies as a whole, and perhaps seek out good holistic treatment. Osteopathy helped me too, acupuncture has helped Wendy and others, homeopathy has helped Nancy S, kinesiology has helped Carmen. No treatment can be guaranteed, of course, but the complementary therapies, in the right hands, are worth a try.

Thanks again for your post, and welcome back.

Re: osteopathy

Kathy G on 11/12/02 at 13:37 (099894)

Janet,

What an encouraging story! I'm so pleased for you. Here in my part of the country (NH), for the most part, our osteopaths are all Primary Care Physicians and the insurance companies refuse to pay them for osteopathic treatment. Most of them just don't have the time to do them, even if one is willing to pay cash for the treatment. It is most disheartening as I have gone to an osteopath since I was about eighteen years old and believe heartily in their effectiveness. When my osteopath retired and I couldn't find another one, I found a wonderful chiropractor who was almost as good. Alas, he passed away. Then I found a great osteopath who was about 45 minutes away from my home but he, too, passed away. (Are we seeing a pattern here?) Anyhow, since his passing, the only one I've found turned out to be, well let's be kind and say, an extremist who believed in some rather outlandish treatment. So, I now go to a chiropractor. He is good and probably comes close to doing osteopathic manipulation but he's still not an osteopath. He was the one who first massaged my calf when I was experiencing such discomfort and since that time, my husband has been willing to massage the area. He's sharp and knows when to send me to my doctor and he doesn't keep people coming back for appointment after appointment. He, unfortunately, doesn't seem to think he can help my foot problems.

Thanks for putting in a good word for Osteopaths as I don't think we mention them very often on these boards and they can be wonderful.

Re: osteopathy

Ed Davis, DPM on 11/14/02 at 23:45 (100212)

Janet:

A very informative story. Osteopaths in the US tried so hard to be recognized as MD's that they set aside a lot of their knowledge of manipulative medicine. Some are now trying to get back to their 'roots.'

An osteopath with a strong interest in feet named Hiss had a clinic in Los Angeles during the 40's, 50's and 60's in which he treated as many as 100 patients per day with foot problems using primarily manipulative techniques. Few podiatrists wanted to follow his lead. One exception was Rue Tikker, DPM, now retired an living in Napa, CA. Rue is offering courses in Hiss' osteopathic manipulation techniques of the foot to all who are interested. I took his course about 3 years ago and encourage others to do the same.
Ed