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silicone injections

Posted by Kim B. on 11/13/02 at 01:12 (099990)

I have had 9 surgeries on my feet, 5 on right, 4 on left. Walking now is a nightmare. I feel like I'm walking on my nuckles. My doctor says I need to have silicone injections because I have no padding left on the bottom of my feet. Since this is not something he does, he is having a hard time recommending me to someone. Can you tell me what benifit this would be for me, or if you have any ideas on something that wold make walking less painfull.Or even if you might know of someone in my area.

Desperatly Seeking Help

Kim

Re: silicone injections

Ed Davis, DPM on 11/13/02 at 22:06 (100094)

That is a bit of an unusual recommendation. Silicone was tried as means to restore 'padding' under boney prominences during the 60's. It was not very successful because the silicone would not stay the place it was injected but tended to migrate. Other problems arose with the softer silicones such as tissue reactions, not to mention some auto-immune reactions noted with the silicone breast implants. Far fewer problems existed with the more rigid forms of silicone used in digital implants-- used to restore motion in joints but not for padding.

I am not aware of any practitioners who still use this. There may be a number of other alternatives such as shoe therapy and orthotic devices designed to re-distribute weight bearing pressure away from tender spots.
Ed

Re: silicone injections

Ed Davis, DPM on 11/13/02 at 22:06 (100094)

That is a bit of an unusual recommendation. Silicone was tried as means to restore 'padding' under boney prominences during the 60's. It was not very successful because the silicone would not stay the place it was injected but tended to migrate. Other problems arose with the softer silicones such as tissue reactions, not to mention some auto-immune reactions noted with the silicone breast implants. Far fewer problems existed with the more rigid forms of silicone used in digital implants-- used to restore motion in joints but not for padding.

I am not aware of any practitioners who still use this. There may be a number of other alternatives such as shoe therapy and orthotic devices designed to re-distribute weight bearing pressure away from tender spots.
Ed