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generalizing

Posted by pala on 11/14/02 at 09:23 (100128)

when my best freind moved from alabama to berkeley he was treated horribly.he moved to berkely because he was the liberalist, most thoughtful, kindest intellectual ever. some things going on in alabama twenty years ago just sickened him. he wanted to live in a more humane and progressive place. he had quite a southern accent. when he opened his mouth in berkeley many people assumed immediately that he was a stupid , mean, racist. this experience broke his heart. bias, prejudice, pre judging people is not only morally wrong, it is just plain wrong. he finally moved back south because bias against southerners hurt him. so luckily i have his company here in georgia. where i'm treated not so nice sometimes because of my new york accent.

Re: generalizing

Suzanne D on 11/14/02 at 12:33 (100150)

It is so sad to see someone branded as something or the other because of the way they talk, look, etc. I always tell my students (when the inevitable situation arises at school in which someone feels badly because they're 'different') that I'm so glad they weren't cut out with cookie cutters! That makes them smile, and then I go on to tell them that what makes the class interesting is the fact that there are so many differences. Besides, I tell them, if they were all just alike, think how mixed up I would be all the time trying to tell them apart! That works with first graders, and I hope it helps plant the seed in their hearts and minds that it is o.k. to be 'different'!

I am told that I have a very pronounced southern accent (to me, I just sound 'normal' :-) ). I well remember when someone came from a northern state to the other school where I taught. Several people said she 'sounded so smart'. She WAS a smart woman, but they said that as soon as they heard her talk. It was because she had a 'northern accent'. There have been times when I have felt that I wa not taken as seriously as I might have been had I not had my particular accent.

I pity those who judge others on outward appearances and do not look any deeper. And those who only like others who are just like them.

Suzanne :-)

Re: generalizing

wendyn on 11/15/02 at 23:01 (100339)

I know I mentioned this a long time ago, but my brother in-law is a perfect example of how first impressions can be deceiving.

He has long scraggly hair, he's missing a lower front tooth, and I'm pretty sure he only owns one pair of jeans that he wears all the time. I don't believe he's ever owned a car worth more than $500, and he doesn't even have a diswasher. When he goes places, sales people and staff treat him like a nobody. (my 17 year old refers to him as uncle hippie)

Oh - did I mention that he's also a CA, and a partner in a large accounting firm? Probably one of the wealthiest (and brightest) people I know.

Re: generalizing

Suzanne D on 11/14/02 at 12:33 (100150)

It is so sad to see someone branded as something or the other because of the way they talk, look, etc. I always tell my students (when the inevitable situation arises at school in which someone feels badly because they're 'different') that I'm so glad they weren't cut out with cookie cutters! That makes them smile, and then I go on to tell them that what makes the class interesting is the fact that there are so many differences. Besides, I tell them, if they were all just alike, think how mixed up I would be all the time trying to tell them apart! That works with first graders, and I hope it helps plant the seed in their hearts and minds that it is o.k. to be 'different'!

I am told that I have a very pronounced southern accent (to me, I just sound 'normal' :-) ). I well remember when someone came from a northern state to the other school where I taught. Several people said she 'sounded so smart'. She WAS a smart woman, but they said that as soon as they heard her talk. It was because she had a 'northern accent'. There have been times when I have felt that I wa not taken as seriously as I might have been had I not had my particular accent.

I pity those who judge others on outward appearances and do not look any deeper. And those who only like others who are just like them.

Suzanne :-)

Re: generalizing

wendyn on 11/15/02 at 23:01 (100339)

I know I mentioned this a long time ago, but my brother in-law is a perfect example of how first impressions can be deceiving.

He has long scraggly hair, he's missing a lower front tooth, and I'm pretty sure he only owns one pair of jeans that he wears all the time. I don't believe he's ever owned a car worth more than $500, and he doesn't even have a diswasher. When he goes places, sales people and staff treat him like a nobody. (my 17 year old refers to him as uncle hippie)

Oh - did I mention that he's also a CA, and a partner in a large accounting firm? Probably one of the wealthiest (and brightest) people I know.