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shoes AGAIN!

Posted by Rachael T. on 11/15/02 at 13:27 (100287)

I am writing to ask - if anyone else other than myself can NOT wear tennis shoes comfortably. I continue to try & that is what my local pod recommends....but each time, I find them uncomfortable & my feet hurt more afterwards. Can you explain or at least concur with this fact? To the doctors & readers, both, I request your input!

Re: shoes AGAIN!

Carole C in NOLA on 11/15/02 at 13:33 (100290)

Maybe you have the wrong shoes? There are a lot of different kinds of athletic shoes. One thing's for sure. If they cause your feet to hurt more, I'd suggest you don't wear them.

Carole C

Re: AMEN SISTER RACHAEL AMEN!

Mahatmelissama on 11/15/02 at 17:51 (100316)

Yes, yes...I DO SHARE YOUR PAIN! I too, am treated like some kind of abnomal PF sufferer...every person tells me to 'wear sneakers' and I have spent $$$ on them ...(latest New Balances). My SDOs (my orthotics) felt like crap in my sneakers...but then I finally took them out and put them in my Finn Comfort. Now, that is ALL I WEAR!!!

I live for the day where sneakers are more comfortable.

PS: Hey, do you ever hear this one...'Tell me how and WHY it is so uncomfortable?' I answer 'It restricts...feels tight...' HOW AM I SPOSE
TO ANSWER THAT?

You are not alone. And yes, I have tried sneakers...Nikes...Reebooks..New Balances...and they ALL constrict my toes. In fact the pair of New Balances I have right now, my chiropractor says they are 'too large in the shoebox area'

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Ellen J. on 11/17/02 at 09:09 (100469)

I have tried many brands of athletic shoes (walking, running, tennis shoes). All of them hurt my feet, and the reason that my feet can't tolerate them is because the arch is too high in them. They put so much arch support in these shoes that the support presses against my arch with each step and re-inflames my feet.
I have switched to althletic sandals in the gym and that's better for me, as long as I wear some that don't have too much arch support. (I cannot wear Chacos, but can wear Merrils, for instance).
After 3 1/2 yrs of P.F. my feet are so much better, however, that I may soon try a pair of running shoes again.
Ellen J.

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

nancy s. on 11/17/02 at 09:28 (100474)

ellen, can you tell me which athletic shoes you've tried that have too much arch support? this wasn't exactly what you expected from your post, probably, but my athletic shoes -- which i can wear only on a walk at a good clip, so maybe five hours a week -- don't have enough arch support for me. i'm flat-footed; i think they have *almost* enough support, but not quite. they're new balance 608s and the brooks addiction. they're the best for me i've found so far, but i'm still looking.
thanks.
n.
.

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Ellen J. on 11/17/02 at 09:39 (100476)

Hi Nancy,
That is great that you can at least wear them while walking, as you are doing better than I was. If I even tried to walk a few paces in the athletic shoes, my feet would be worse. The New Balance (can't remember which model) had the least arch support, so I was able to wear them more than the others. I tried Avia, Saucony, Brooks, Nike also, and couldn't wear them. Possibly your problem might not be the amount of arch support--have you looked at how flexible they are at the ball of foot area? If too stiff, they can cause a problem. Someone told me tennis sneaks can be very stiff, for instance. Also, have you looked into stability in the heel area?
One thing that might help is to subscribe to a mail-order catalog called Road Runner Sports, which gives you details about all the shoe models they sell. Each shoe model has a set of symbols next to the text which rates the amount of cushion, support, etc. You could then go and try some of the models on in a store after looking at the catalog.
Sorry I can't be of more help. If you want to try an athletic sandal with more support, maybe the Tevas or Chacos might be good. However, I don't know if they will keep your feet stable enough side-to-side or not.
Good luck!
Ellen

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

nancy s. on 11/17/02 at 09:48 (100479)

thanks, ellen. i do check the shoes for stiffness or flexibility in the right places. i now suspect it's a matter of the right arch support. i'll look into Road Runner Sports, which may have the answers i need.

i don't need sandals -- my birks are great for everything else. i'd just like to be able to wear athletic shoes when i'm on my feet working in addition to when i'm going for a walk. thanks again.

n
p.s. If it doesn't work out, i'm certainly still grateful to be walking at all, which i couldn't do for too long a time.
.

.

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Rachael T. on 11/17/02 at 21:21 (100533)

I too cannot wear athletic shoes - I've tried several brands & models....& all seem to let my feet 'expand too much!' or something! I wear my orthotics in my Mephisto light weight boots - & like my Birks...but my closet is full of sneakers that don't see daylight anymore. Maybe it is side to side or lengthwise motion - I don't know -- but upon putting tthe sneakers on, I immediately feet discomfort & the next day - my pain is escalated!

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Carole C in NOLA on 11/17/02 at 21:55 (100534)

I'll talk about running shoes here, since most people have told me that running shoes are better constructed and have more cushioning than other athletic shoes. We do have plenty of people here who prefer walking shoes and particularly cross-trainers, though.

To me, the fit of the running shoe is all important. I need to be able to get plenty of snugness and support from the sides of the shoe, to keep my foot from flattening out so (especially when my PF was worse) I would spend considerable time tightening the laces at each set of holes that they go through, when putting the shoes on. Donna taught me how to make a runner's loop, which helps if my heel is sloshing about side to side (not a good thing).

You are so right that a shoe that 'lets your feet expand too much' and doesn't provide the support that you need, is not a good thing. Some shoes are really hard to adjust so that they provide the right amount of snug support in the right places, because the shape of the shoe just isn't right for my feet.

I found that the New Balance 'SL-1' last fit my particular foot much better than their 'SL-2' last, which seemed to let my foot slosh around too much no matter how tight I had the laces. That was due to the shape of my foot. The laces would get really tight over the middle of my foot, and yet the toes and heels would slip right and left, pivoting on the tighter part of the shoe. New Balance shoes with the SL-1 last seem to have a narrower toe box and (despite what they say) the heel feels more snug to me too.

I learned from the good people on the orthotics/inserts/shoes board on this website, that a good running shoe will not only fit my foot well and tighten up nicely and evenly, but that there's a second aspect to pay attention to. A shoe may fit wonderfully, and feel heavenly on my foot, and yet cause my stride to become strange. I am particularly thinking of the New Balance 854, which is designed for someone who pronates more than me. It fits my foot wonderfully, and feels super, but when I walk in that shoe my toes point outwards like a duck. So, I had to return them.

Sorry about the rambling; I hope somewhere in this there is something that can help. It is very hard to find the perfect athletic shoe. For my feet, the NB 991 is pretty close.

Carole C

Re: And also...

Carole C in NOLA on 11/17/02 at 22:01 (100535)

And also, I forgot to mention that I really couldn't wear running shoes at all until my pain level went down to about a 2 on a scale of 1-10.

When I was in more pain, my feet needed orthotics constantly. So, until my pain was less I could only wear my custom orthotics (which were fit in a huge SAS tie-up leather shoe and wouldn't fit in my athletic shoes) or my Birkenstocks which have an orthotic footbed.

Carole C

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Richard, C.Ped on 11/18/02 at 09:06 (100553)

Hi Ellen,
You may have described you foot type, so please forgive me if you did. What type of foot do you have? Flat or high arched?
Richard, C.Ped

Re: Re:Richard's question

Ellen J. on 11/18/02 at 09:26 (100555)

Hi Richard,
I have a somewhat flat foot. One Physical therapist recently remarked that my arch looks normal until I stand on it (I thought this was true of all overpronaters). Another P.T. said I'm a moderate to severe overpronator and yet another said my feet are 'not all that bad'. Different views from all of them. I do know that my feet don't seem to mind overpronating and if I have too much arch support it messes me up. I am an oddball.
Ellen J.

Re: Re:Richard's question

Richard, C.Ped on 11/18/02 at 10:43 (100563)

Hi Ellen,
I was wondering if you were going to say you were flat footed. I suggest that you be tested for forefoot varus by someone like your PT. From my experience, someone with FFV will experience discomfort with any type of arch support. The arch are will feel to high. What FFV means is when your foot and ankle are in a neutral positon, there is quite a bit of space between the ball of your big toe (the first metatarsal head) and the floor. This space must be filled in to provide proper support.

When I make orthotics for someone with FFV, I extend the posting under the first met head. For someone who does not need orthotics, I make a wedge to place under this area. Height of the wedge or posting varies from person to person.

It could not hurt to ask.
Richard, C.Ped

Re: thanks, Richard

Ellen J. on 11/18/02 at 16:32 (100587)

Hi Richard,
I did look into forefoot varus awhile ago and I think I remember the P.T. saying I did have a bit of space there. He did not adjust my orthotics accordingly, however. I tried my own experiment at home and put a pad under the medial side of the ball of my foot. When I walked with the pad in, I experienced more pain than ususal. However, it was my fault because I found out later that when you post in that area, you are supposed to place the padding under the first met. head only, and not under any of the other metatarsal heads. Since the pad was too wide, the posting I made extended under the second metatarsal and consequently worsened the forefoot varus. That's what I get for experimenting without the help of a professional!
Thank you for that suggestion, and I'll go back to the P.T. and ask him about adjusting and adding posting in the area you suggested.
Ellen J.

Re: thanks, Richard

pala on 11/19/02 at 08:49 (100625)

where can i get those pads? can i buy them somewhere?

Re: thanks, Richard

Richard, C.Ped on 11/19/02 at 09:05 (100628)

Pala,
I would recommend getting the proper diagnosis about FFV. The height of the pad or posting can differ. You do not want to much or to little. A doc or C.Ped can give you the proper amount. For a C.Ped to do it, you will more than likely need a prescription.
Richard, c.Ped

Re: do-it-yourself hazards

Ellen J. on 11/19/02 at 15:57 (100661)

Hi Pala,
Since I messed up my feet (for a day or two) by putting pads in myself, I agree with Richard that it is best left to someone who can evaluate the amount of space before filling in that space. I just bought those pads you put under the balls of the feet that are used to create extra padding, and that was the wrong move on my part. Just didn't want you to make your feet sore like I did.
Hope you find someone who can help with the posting under that area.
Ellen

Re: thanks, Richard

pala on 11/21/02 at 11:46 (100795)

i respectively disagree with you richard. i have seen about thirty professionals, each one worse than the other, most treatments and orthotics either harming me further or just taking more moeney for nothing . i am out of most of my life savings. i believe that each of us must decide when it is time to see another professional or when it is time to do it oneself. . needless to say it is time for me to try to help myself . if someone else knows where to get these pads and would like to tell me i would appreciate it. or at least, what they are called so i can do a search for them. thanx. p.s. i am not knocking the professionals here. ive been helped more by all here, including you, than by all the ones i've given all my money to .

Re: do-it-yourself hazards

pala on 11/21/02 at 11:52 (100796)

just read this after i posted to richard. see above post and yet i thank you for your concern. i will go ahead and try pads at any rate. i will put very little weight on very slowly. assuming someone lets me know how to get the pads. medical professionals have harmed me far more than i could ever harm myself, unless i put on a blindfold and hacked at my feet with sharp knives. that does not mean you and richard are wrong for the majority. but this is my life, my feet, my hideous luck with doctors. thanx for your input, however.

Re: pads

Ellen J. on 11/21/02 at 15:40 (100824)

Hi Pala,
I have not tried the following, so I can't say if it's good or bad: An author in a book I read mentioned that you can get stuff called 'mole foam' from the foot care section of the drug store and cut a small circle of it, then stick that under the section of your orthotic that is directly under the first metatarsal head. That is the important part--don't cut the circle so large that any part of it extends underneath the second metatarsal head. If you want to be super careful about it, I would place on ONE layer of molefoam under the orthotic (sticking it to the bottom of the orthotic) and if that doesn't create enough padding, you might then add another layer. Adding additional layers is purely a guess on my part, since, as I said, I've not tried this technique. I'm glad you are planning to be very careful, as I would hate to hear that the experiment resulted in a setback.
Anyway, the product mentioned above is not 'moleskin'--moleskin is thinner, I think. You want the slightly thicker 'molefoam'.
Good luck. I think they mentioned cutting a disk about the size of maybe a quarter? (not sure I can remember that part).
Ellen

Re: pads

pala on 11/21/02 at 16:12 (100826)

thank you. i will look for it. i appreciate your sharing this. i thinkit's a very good idea to go slow like you said.

Re: thanks, Richard

Carole C in NOLA on 11/21/02 at 21:48 (100860)

That is really awful, and really strange too. Like you, I've learned a lot from these boards, and I think Richard and Dr. Ed and all the rest here are super too, but my custom orthotics made all the difference for me.

But then, I have a pretty classic case of PF, and maybe yours is more difficult for the foot professionals to deal with. That's all I can think of.

I only went to one C.Ped once, and she made the custom orthotics that were so wonderful for me. I was sent to her by my rheumatologist. I've never seen a podiatrist, and I never needed to see a second foot professional or even go back to this one for a second visit.

Carole C

Re: thanks, Richard

pala on 11/21/02 at 21:59 (100864)

i hope it is strange. i hope that not too many people have had very bad experiences, but reading these boards it sounds like some have. i think you are really lucky. . what kind of orthotics did you get?

Re: thanks, Richard

Carole C in NOLA on 11/21/02 at 22:05 (100865)

I hope it is strange, too.

I got soft custom orthotics. They are foam pasted on a plastic that is probably eva, and then they have some other eva-like semi-rigid bendable plastic stuff that she used during the fitting process to re-adjust them so they were just right.

They really helped me a lot, and I think I'd still be sitting with my feet up and crying with pain if it weren't for my orthotics.

Carole C

Re: construction of my orthotics

Carole C in NOLA on 11/21/02 at 22:19 (100867)

Actually, now that I look at them the top layer is blue foam, and the bottom layer is black and probably vinyl rather than eva, and between them I can see what looks like another layer, maybe, thin and white. After she finished them, she wasn't satisfied and adjusted them by putting blue plastic (the consistency of a rubber ball) on the outside of the vinyl in the arch area. Because of the thicknesses I wouldn't be at all surprised if she didn't put some of that on the of the outer layer too.

These are the orthotics from heaven, believe me! They are definitely neither wimpy nor ineffectual, that's for sure. They put my feet in the position that they needed to be in, in order to heal, and kept them there. I don't wear them much any more because my feet are essentially healed by now, but when I needed them they were such a blessing.

Carole C

Re: shoes AGAIN!

Carole C in NOLA on 11/15/02 at 13:33 (100290)

Maybe you have the wrong shoes? There are a lot of different kinds of athletic shoes. One thing's for sure. If they cause your feet to hurt more, I'd suggest you don't wear them.

Carole C

Re: AMEN SISTER RACHAEL AMEN!

Mahatmelissama on 11/15/02 at 17:51 (100316)

Yes, yes...I DO SHARE YOUR PAIN! I too, am treated like some kind of abnomal PF sufferer...every person tells me to 'wear sneakers' and I have spent $$$ on them ...(latest New Balances). My SDOs (my orthotics) felt like crap in my sneakers...but then I finally took them out and put them in my Finn Comfort. Now, that is ALL I WEAR!!!

I live for the day where sneakers are more comfortable.

PS: Hey, do you ever hear this one...'Tell me how and WHY it is so uncomfortable?' I answer 'It restricts...feels tight...' HOW AM I SPOSE
TO ANSWER THAT?

You are not alone. And yes, I have tried sneakers...Nikes...Reebooks..New Balances...and they ALL constrict my toes. In fact the pair of New Balances I have right now, my chiropractor says they are 'too large in the shoebox area'

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Ellen J. on 11/17/02 at 09:09 (100469)

I have tried many brands of athletic shoes (walking, running, tennis shoes). All of them hurt my feet, and the reason that my feet can't tolerate them is because the arch is too high in them. They put so much arch support in these shoes that the support presses against my arch with each step and re-inflames my feet.
I have switched to althletic sandals in the gym and that's better for me, as long as I wear some that don't have too much arch support. (I cannot wear Chacos, but can wear Merrils, for instance).
After 3 1/2 yrs of P.F. my feet are so much better, however, that I may soon try a pair of running shoes again.
Ellen J.

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

nancy s. on 11/17/02 at 09:28 (100474)

ellen, can you tell me which athletic shoes you've tried that have too much arch support? this wasn't exactly what you expected from your post, probably, but my athletic shoes -- which i can wear only on a walk at a good clip, so maybe five hours a week -- don't have enough arch support for me. i'm flat-footed; i think they have *almost* enough support, but not quite. they're new balance 608s and the brooks addiction. they're the best for me i've found so far, but i'm still looking.
thanks.
n.
.

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Ellen J. on 11/17/02 at 09:39 (100476)

Hi Nancy,
That is great that you can at least wear them while walking, as you are doing better than I was. If I even tried to walk a few paces in the athletic shoes, my feet would be worse. The New Balance (can't remember which model) had the least arch support, so I was able to wear them more than the others. I tried Avia, Saucony, Brooks, Nike also, and couldn't wear them. Possibly your problem might not be the amount of arch support--have you looked at how flexible they are at the ball of foot area? If too stiff, they can cause a problem. Someone told me tennis sneaks can be very stiff, for instance. Also, have you looked into stability in the heel area?
One thing that might help is to subscribe to a mail-order catalog called Road Runner Sports, which gives you details about all the shoe models they sell. Each shoe model has a set of symbols next to the text which rates the amount of cushion, support, etc. You could then go and try some of the models on in a store after looking at the catalog.
Sorry I can't be of more help. If you want to try an athletic sandal with more support, maybe the Tevas or Chacos might be good. However, I don't know if they will keep your feet stable enough side-to-side or not.
Good luck!
Ellen

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

nancy s. on 11/17/02 at 09:48 (100479)

thanks, ellen. i do check the shoes for stiffness or flexibility in the right places. i now suspect it's a matter of the right arch support. i'll look into Road Runner Sports, which may have the answers i need.

i don't need sandals -- my birks are great for everything else. i'd just like to be able to wear athletic shoes when i'm on my feet working in addition to when i'm going for a walk. thanks again.

n
p.s. If it doesn't work out, i'm certainly still grateful to be walking at all, which i couldn't do for too long a time.
.

.

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Rachael T. on 11/17/02 at 21:21 (100533)

I too cannot wear athletic shoes - I've tried several brands & models....& all seem to let my feet 'expand too much!' or something! I wear my orthotics in my Mephisto light weight boots - & like my Birks...but my closet is full of sneakers that don't see daylight anymore. Maybe it is side to side or lengthwise motion - I don't know -- but upon putting tthe sneakers on, I immediately feet discomfort & the next day - my pain is escalated!

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Carole C in NOLA on 11/17/02 at 21:55 (100534)

I'll talk about running shoes here, since most people have told me that running shoes are better constructed and have more cushioning than other athletic shoes. We do have plenty of people here who prefer walking shoes and particularly cross-trainers, though.

To me, the fit of the running shoe is all important. I need to be able to get plenty of snugness and support from the sides of the shoe, to keep my foot from flattening out so (especially when my PF was worse) I would spend considerable time tightening the laces at each set of holes that they go through, when putting the shoes on. Donna taught me how to make a runner's loop, which helps if my heel is sloshing about side to side (not a good thing).

You are so right that a shoe that 'lets your feet expand too much' and doesn't provide the support that you need, is not a good thing. Some shoes are really hard to adjust so that they provide the right amount of snug support in the right places, because the shape of the shoe just isn't right for my feet.

I found that the New Balance 'SL-1' last fit my particular foot much better than their 'SL-2' last, which seemed to let my foot slosh around too much no matter how tight I had the laces. That was due to the shape of my foot. The laces would get really tight over the middle of my foot, and yet the toes and heels would slip right and left, pivoting on the tighter part of the shoe. New Balance shoes with the SL-1 last seem to have a narrower toe box and (despite what they say) the heel feels more snug to me too.

I learned from the good people on the orthotics/inserts/shoes board on this website, that a good running shoe will not only fit my foot well and tighten up nicely and evenly, but that there's a second aspect to pay attention to. A shoe may fit wonderfully, and feel heavenly on my foot, and yet cause my stride to become strange. I am particularly thinking of the New Balance 854, which is designed for someone who pronates more than me. It fits my foot wonderfully, and feels super, but when I walk in that shoe my toes point outwards like a duck. So, I had to return them.

Sorry about the rambling; I hope somewhere in this there is something that can help. It is very hard to find the perfect athletic shoe. For my feet, the NB 991 is pretty close.

Carole C

Re: And also...

Carole C in NOLA on 11/17/02 at 22:01 (100535)

And also, I forgot to mention that I really couldn't wear running shoes at all until my pain level went down to about a 2 on a scale of 1-10.

When I was in more pain, my feet needed orthotics constantly. So, until my pain was less I could only wear my custom orthotics (which were fit in a huge SAS tie-up leather shoe and wouldn't fit in my athletic shoes) or my Birkenstocks which have an orthotic footbed.

Carole C

Re: I cannot wear athletic shoes

Richard, C.Ped on 11/18/02 at 09:06 (100553)

Hi Ellen,
You may have described you foot type, so please forgive me if you did. What type of foot do you have? Flat or high arched?
Richard, C.Ped

Re: Re:Richard's question

Ellen J. on 11/18/02 at 09:26 (100555)

Hi Richard,
I have a somewhat flat foot. One Physical therapist recently remarked that my arch looks normal until I stand on it (I thought this was true of all overpronaters). Another P.T. said I'm a moderate to severe overpronator and yet another said my feet are 'not all that bad'. Different views from all of them. I do know that my feet don't seem to mind overpronating and if I have too much arch support it messes me up. I am an oddball.
Ellen J.

Re: Re:Richard's question

Richard, C.Ped on 11/18/02 at 10:43 (100563)

Hi Ellen,
I was wondering if you were going to say you were flat footed. I suggest that you be tested for forefoot varus by someone like your PT. From my experience, someone with FFV will experience discomfort with any type of arch support. The arch are will feel to high. What FFV means is when your foot and ankle are in a neutral positon, there is quite a bit of space between the ball of your big toe (the first metatarsal head) and the floor. This space must be filled in to provide proper support.

When I make orthotics for someone with FFV, I extend the posting under the first met head. For someone who does not need orthotics, I make a wedge to place under this area. Height of the wedge or posting varies from person to person.

It could not hurt to ask.
Richard, C.Ped

Re: thanks, Richard

Ellen J. on 11/18/02 at 16:32 (100587)

Hi Richard,
I did look into forefoot varus awhile ago and I think I remember the P.T. saying I did have a bit of space there. He did not adjust my orthotics accordingly, however. I tried my own experiment at home and put a pad under the medial side of the ball of my foot. When I walked with the pad in, I experienced more pain than ususal. However, it was my fault because I found out later that when you post in that area, you are supposed to place the padding under the first met. head only, and not under any of the other metatarsal heads. Since the pad was too wide, the posting I made extended under the second metatarsal and consequently worsened the forefoot varus. That's what I get for experimenting without the help of a professional!
Thank you for that suggestion, and I'll go back to the P.T. and ask him about adjusting and adding posting in the area you suggested.
Ellen J.

Re: thanks, Richard

pala on 11/19/02 at 08:49 (100625)

where can i get those pads? can i buy them somewhere?

Re: thanks, Richard

Richard, C.Ped on 11/19/02 at 09:05 (100628)

Pala,
I would recommend getting the proper diagnosis about FFV. The height of the pad or posting can differ. You do not want to much or to little. A doc or C.Ped can give you the proper amount. For a C.Ped to do it, you will more than likely need a prescription.
Richard, c.Ped

Re: do-it-yourself hazards

Ellen J. on 11/19/02 at 15:57 (100661)

Hi Pala,
Since I messed up my feet (for a day or two) by putting pads in myself, I agree with Richard that it is best left to someone who can evaluate the amount of space before filling in that space. I just bought those pads you put under the balls of the feet that are used to create extra padding, and that was the wrong move on my part. Just didn't want you to make your feet sore like I did.
Hope you find someone who can help with the posting under that area.
Ellen

Re: thanks, Richard

pala on 11/21/02 at 11:46 (100795)

i respectively disagree with you richard. i have seen about thirty professionals, each one worse than the other, most treatments and orthotics either harming me further or just taking more moeney for nothing . i am out of most of my life savings. i believe that each of us must decide when it is time to see another professional or when it is time to do it oneself. . needless to say it is time for me to try to help myself . if someone else knows where to get these pads and would like to tell me i would appreciate it. or at least, what they are called so i can do a search for them. thanx. p.s. i am not knocking the professionals here. ive been helped more by all here, including you, than by all the ones i've given all my money to .

Re: do-it-yourself hazards

pala on 11/21/02 at 11:52 (100796)

just read this after i posted to richard. see above post and yet i thank you for your concern. i will go ahead and try pads at any rate. i will put very little weight on very slowly. assuming someone lets me know how to get the pads. medical professionals have harmed me far more than i could ever harm myself, unless i put on a blindfold and hacked at my feet with sharp knives. that does not mean you and richard are wrong for the majority. but this is my life, my feet, my hideous luck with doctors. thanx for your input, however.

Re: pads

Ellen J. on 11/21/02 at 15:40 (100824)

Hi Pala,
I have not tried the following, so I can't say if it's good or bad: An author in a book I read mentioned that you can get stuff called 'mole foam' from the foot care section of the drug store and cut a small circle of it, then stick that under the section of your orthotic that is directly under the first metatarsal head. That is the important part--don't cut the circle so large that any part of it extends underneath the second metatarsal head. If you want to be super careful about it, I would place on ONE layer of molefoam under the orthotic (sticking it to the bottom of the orthotic) and if that doesn't create enough padding, you might then add another layer. Adding additional layers is purely a guess on my part, since, as I said, I've not tried this technique. I'm glad you are planning to be very careful, as I would hate to hear that the experiment resulted in a setback.
Anyway, the product mentioned above is not 'moleskin'--moleskin is thinner, I think. You want the slightly thicker 'molefoam'.
Good luck. I think they mentioned cutting a disk about the size of maybe a quarter? (not sure I can remember that part).
Ellen

Re: pads

pala on 11/21/02 at 16:12 (100826)

thank you. i will look for it. i appreciate your sharing this. i thinkit's a very good idea to go slow like you said.

Re: thanks, Richard

Carole C in NOLA on 11/21/02 at 21:48 (100860)

That is really awful, and really strange too. Like you, I've learned a lot from these boards, and I think Richard and Dr. Ed and all the rest here are super too, but my custom orthotics made all the difference for me.

But then, I have a pretty classic case of PF, and maybe yours is more difficult for the foot professionals to deal with. That's all I can think of.

I only went to one C.Ped once, and she made the custom orthotics that were so wonderful for me. I was sent to her by my rheumatologist. I've never seen a podiatrist, and I never needed to see a second foot professional or even go back to this one for a second visit.

Carole C

Re: thanks, Richard

pala on 11/21/02 at 21:59 (100864)

i hope it is strange. i hope that not too many people have had very bad experiences, but reading these boards it sounds like some have. i think you are really lucky. . what kind of orthotics did you get?

Re: thanks, Richard

Carole C in NOLA on 11/21/02 at 22:05 (100865)

I hope it is strange, too.

I got soft custom orthotics. They are foam pasted on a plastic that is probably eva, and then they have some other eva-like semi-rigid bendable plastic stuff that she used during the fitting process to re-adjust them so they were just right.

They really helped me a lot, and I think I'd still be sitting with my feet up and crying with pain if it weren't for my orthotics.

Carole C

Re: construction of my orthotics

Carole C in NOLA on 11/21/02 at 22:19 (100867)

Actually, now that I look at them the top layer is blue foam, and the bottom layer is black and probably vinyl rather than eva, and between them I can see what looks like another layer, maybe, thin and white. After she finished them, she wasn't satisfied and adjusted them by putting blue plastic (the consistency of a rubber ball) on the outside of the vinyl in the arch area. Because of the thicknesses I wouldn't be at all surprised if she didn't put some of that on the of the outer layer too.

These are the orthotics from heaven, believe me! They are definitely neither wimpy nor ineffectual, that's for sure. They put my feet in the position that they needed to be in, in order to heal, and kept them there. I don't wear them much any more because my feet are essentially healed by now, but when I needed them they were such a blessing.

Carole C