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toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Posted by Kari B on 11/16/02 at 13:33 (100414)

Hi everyone,
I love coming here to read all the new posts each day... makes me remember that even though we all live with some kind of pain, we all still have a sense of humor!! :-) Nancy S. I hope you feel better soon!! Hope everyone has a great weekend!! (send some of your snow to CA please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)
Kari

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

nancy s. on 11/16/02 at 13:48 (100416)

oh kari, i'd send you every last flake of it if i could. we had very little snow last year, and i'm spoiled rotten for this year. you have a great weekend yourself!
nancy
.

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Suzanne D on 11/16/02 at 14:22 (100420)

Yes, you are so right, Kari. A sense of humor can help many situations, and coming here is a pleasure! And, Nancy S., I hope you feel better soon!

I've found a sense of humor helps greatly at school. I have a little boy in first grade who has had multiple labels already and has received help from therapists galore: speech, ocupational, physical, special ed. To my delight, I discovered he has a real sense of humor. He was the one who one day announced he knew what he was going to be when he grew up: a first grade teacher. That pleased me so much that later when my husband came in the room I said, 'Roger, tell him what you decided you want to be when you grow up!'.

He grinned and looked at me out of the corner of his eyes (He rarely looks at anyone directly in the face.) and said, 'A 8th grade teacher'.

Later, I said, 'Roger, I thought you told me you wanted to be a FIRST grade teacher'.

He said, 'Yeah, I was 'twickin' (tricking) you!' with a big grin on his face.

Now, we play that little game sometimes. He'll say, 'I want to go home. Is it time? Is it time to go?'

If I replied, 'No, now get busy' or something to that effect, he just might go into one of his screaming tantrums. So I grin and say, 'Well, I guess I'll have to call for that helicopter that picks up children who don't want to stay for the buses!'

He then will grin and say, 'You twickin' me!' and I'll just smile and tell him that he caught me.

It sure beats dealing with an out-of-control little boy who used to have to be physically restrained.

Suzanne :-)

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Carole C in NOLA on 11/16/02 at 14:33 (100423)

Wow, Suzanne! What wonderful ways of dealing with a difficult little boy. You really are a born teacher and seem to have a wonderful way with little kids.

Carole C

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Suzanne D on 11/16/02 at 14:47 (100424)

Thanks, Carole. I'm afraid everyone will get tired of me relating almost every thread to something in first grade but I guess it's so much a part of me that it just comes out! Sometimes I think I'm permanently stuck in first grade and now think like a 6 year old... Maybe that's why I can't solve Elliott's puzzle!

Elliott, I'm trying to imagine you in first grade...I think I can see a little boy with a slightly impish grin and twinkle in his eyes who might have done an exemplary job of 'outsmarting' his teacher from time to time!

Suzanne :-)

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Kari B on 11/16/02 at 18:46 (100442)

Suzanne,
I personally love to read your stories about your 1st grade class! That story just gave me alot of hope for the future as I have a 4 year old autistic son. We too have dealt with the speech therapy, occupational, and physical therapy, and now in a delightful special ed class that has helped him to come a long way! It's great to know that there are teachers out there that love our children as much as we do. My little guy is the delight of my life, I truly believe my life has been enriched by God giving him to us. And it has made me remember what my mom used to tell me, 'God only gives us as much as we can handle'. So you can keep telling me your stories and I will always read them with a great amount of respect for the tough job you do!!
Kari

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Suzanne D on 11/16/02 at 19:00 (100444)

Thank you so much, Kari, and what a wonderful mother you are! I have no doubt that your son will continue to succeed and progress with your guidance and love and the instruction and help he will receive at school. Children who are blessed with parents who love them and who feel their lives are enriched by them are fortunate indeed. They WILL succeed. So sad are the cases in which the parents don't have or won't take the time or the energy or the understanding to love and help them. We try as hard as we can at school to make up for that in those cases, but it is hard.

We had a little boy at our school some years ago who is a great success story for succeeding with autism. He learned to read, he did so much that some thought at one time that he might not do. I saw his mother Friday when I went to pick up my daughter at the high school. His mom is a custodian there, and she told me her son is doing so very well this year as a high school freshman. She is so proud of him, and so are all of us who worked with him in the past.

Good luck to you and your son!

Suzanne :-)

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Kari B on 11/16/02 at 19:20 (100448)

Suzanne,
Thats great about the high school freshman! Our goal right now for Tyler is for him to mainstream into Kindergarten next year and it looks as though he will. I'm one of the very few moms of an autistic child who decided to do the medication route very early on. He has a great Dr who has made sure he's gotten every possible treatment and recommended a med that was fairly new on the market and it's been very helpful. He was on it for a year and we decided to wean him off of it during the summer months (joint decision between family, Dr, and spec ed teacher) to see if his symptoms have changed or disappeared because he was doing so well... in that one year he went from being completely non-verbal to a full vocabulary in sign language to being completely verbal functional child. Unfortunately alot of the symptoms like the trantrums and his speech started to disappear again, along with wanting to be alone and what I refer to as 'zoning'. So, he's been put back on the medication which was a very sad day for me, but my sister reminded me that I needed to think back about the reasons why we put him on it in the first place and since it helps and gives him a reasonably 'normal' (what is normal? LOL) life then I shouldn't feel bad for him needing the med. So far he has met most of the goals we've been trying for (was recently released from private speech therapy because the therapist couldnt find anything to challenge him with and is only getting the school ST for minor problems) and now we are only really working on potty training him so he can go to Kindergarten. (We cannot figure out why he won't potty train unless its a sensory problem). Anyway, I could go on all night about him but I need to go help work on dinner (trying to help hubby as much as I can right now cuz I am scheduled for tts release on 12/3/02 and I know he will be left with all the domestic things :) ) Thanks for sharing with me!
Kari

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Suzanne D on 11/16/02 at 21:19 (100456)

Kari, it sounds as if your son has made remarkable progress; I am so happy for you both!

In my personal opinion, I don't think you should feel defeated at all concerning placing him back on the medication. I have seen medicine work wonders with children and enable them to reach milestones never before anticipated. I certainly don't push for medicine for every child who has a challenge, but in some cases, I think it has been the key to helping them reach their potential.

Good luck in your goals for him this school year, and good luck to YOU in regard to your surgery next month. I hope it is a great success.

Keep us informed!
Suzanne :-)

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

nancy s. on 11/16/02 at 13:48 (100416)

oh kari, i'd send you every last flake of it if i could. we had very little snow last year, and i'm spoiled rotten for this year. you have a great weekend yourself!
nancy
.

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Suzanne D on 11/16/02 at 14:22 (100420)

Yes, you are so right, Kari. A sense of humor can help many situations, and coming here is a pleasure! And, Nancy S., I hope you feel better soon!

I've found a sense of humor helps greatly at school. I have a little boy in first grade who has had multiple labels already and has received help from therapists galore: speech, ocupational, physical, special ed. To my delight, I discovered he has a real sense of humor. He was the one who one day announced he knew what he was going to be when he grew up: a first grade teacher. That pleased me so much that later when my husband came in the room I said, 'Roger, tell him what you decided you want to be when you grow up!'.

He grinned and looked at me out of the corner of his eyes (He rarely looks at anyone directly in the face.) and said, 'A 8th grade teacher'.

Later, I said, 'Roger, I thought you told me you wanted to be a FIRST grade teacher'.

He said, 'Yeah, I was 'twickin' (tricking) you!' with a big grin on his face.

Now, we play that little game sometimes. He'll say, 'I want to go home. Is it time? Is it time to go?'

If I replied, 'No, now get busy' or something to that effect, he just might go into one of his screaming tantrums. So I grin and say, 'Well, I guess I'll have to call for that helicopter that picks up children who don't want to stay for the buses!'

He then will grin and say, 'You twickin' me!' and I'll just smile and tell him that he caught me.

It sure beats dealing with an out-of-control little boy who used to have to be physically restrained.

Suzanne :-)

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Carole C in NOLA on 11/16/02 at 14:33 (100423)

Wow, Suzanne! What wonderful ways of dealing with a difficult little boy. You really are a born teacher and seem to have a wonderful way with little kids.

Carole C

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Suzanne D on 11/16/02 at 14:47 (100424)

Thanks, Carole. I'm afraid everyone will get tired of me relating almost every thread to something in first grade but I guess it's so much a part of me that it just comes out! Sometimes I think I'm permanently stuck in first grade and now think like a 6 year old... Maybe that's why I can't solve Elliott's puzzle!

Elliott, I'm trying to imagine you in first grade...I think I can see a little boy with a slightly impish grin and twinkle in his eyes who might have done an exemplary job of 'outsmarting' his teacher from time to time!

Suzanne :-)

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Kari B on 11/16/02 at 18:46 (100442)

Suzanne,
I personally love to read your stories about your 1st grade class! That story just gave me alot of hope for the future as I have a 4 year old autistic son. We too have dealt with the speech therapy, occupational, and physical therapy, and now in a delightful special ed class that has helped him to come a long way! It's great to know that there are teachers out there that love our children as much as we do. My little guy is the delight of my life, I truly believe my life has been enriched by God giving him to us. And it has made me remember what my mom used to tell me, 'God only gives us as much as we can handle'. So you can keep telling me your stories and I will always read them with a great amount of respect for the tough job you do!!
Kari

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Suzanne D on 11/16/02 at 19:00 (100444)

Thank you so much, Kari, and what a wonderful mother you are! I have no doubt that your son will continue to succeed and progress with your guidance and love and the instruction and help he will receive at school. Children who are blessed with parents who love them and who feel their lives are enriched by them are fortunate indeed. They WILL succeed. So sad are the cases in which the parents don't have or won't take the time or the energy or the understanding to love and help them. We try as hard as we can at school to make up for that in those cases, but it is hard.

We had a little boy at our school some years ago who is a great success story for succeeding with autism. He learned to read, he did so much that some thought at one time that he might not do. I saw his mother Friday when I went to pick up my daughter at the high school. His mom is a custodian there, and she told me her son is doing so very well this year as a high school freshman. She is so proud of him, and so are all of us who worked with him in the past.

Good luck to you and your son!

Suzanne :-)

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Kari B on 11/16/02 at 19:20 (100448)

Suzanne,
Thats great about the high school freshman! Our goal right now for Tyler is for him to mainstream into Kindergarten next year and it looks as though he will. I'm one of the very few moms of an autistic child who decided to do the medication route very early on. He has a great Dr who has made sure he's gotten every possible treatment and recommended a med that was fairly new on the market and it's been very helpful. He was on it for a year and we decided to wean him off of it during the summer months (joint decision between family, Dr, and spec ed teacher) to see if his symptoms have changed or disappeared because he was doing so well... in that one year he went from being completely non-verbal to a full vocabulary in sign language to being completely verbal functional child. Unfortunately alot of the symptoms like the trantrums and his speech started to disappear again, along with wanting to be alone and what I refer to as 'zoning'. So, he's been put back on the medication which was a very sad day for me, but my sister reminded me that I needed to think back about the reasons why we put him on it in the first place and since it helps and gives him a reasonably 'normal' (what is normal? LOL) life then I shouldn't feel bad for him needing the med. So far he has met most of the goals we've been trying for (was recently released from private speech therapy because the therapist couldnt find anything to challenge him with and is only getting the school ST for minor problems) and now we are only really working on potty training him so he can go to Kindergarten. (We cannot figure out why he won't potty train unless its a sensory problem). Anyway, I could go on all night about him but I need to go help work on dinner (trying to help hubby as much as I can right now cuz I am scheduled for tts release on 12/3/02 and I know he will be left with all the domestic things :) ) Thanks for sharing with me!
Kari

Re: toe jam, marmalade, moon pies....

Suzanne D on 11/16/02 at 21:19 (100456)

Kari, it sounds as if your son has made remarkable progress; I am so happy for you both!

In my personal opinion, I don't think you should feel defeated at all concerning placing him back on the medication. I have seen medicine work wonders with children and enable them to reach milestones never before anticipated. I certainly don't push for medicine for every child who has a challenge, but in some cases, I think it has been the key to helping them reach their potential.

Good luck in your goals for him this school year, and good luck to YOU in regard to your surgery next month. I hope it is a great success.

Keep us informed!
Suzanne :-)