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non-surgical treatment of nuroma

Posted by tom d on 11/19/02 at 14:07 (100649)

I suffer from a nuroma on my right foot.Treatment started with cortisone injections, which wore off in fairly short order. Next the dr. suggested the sclerosing injections of denatured alcohol. I have now had 4 of these shots, which are painful, as the dr. goes thru the top of my foot and it is expensive. To date I feel no better or worse for the injections. In your opinion, after 4 shots and no real effect, should I continue this course of action? If not, what non-surgical alternatives might you recommend?Thank you for your time.

Re: non-surgical treatment of nuroma

Sheila S on 11/20/02 at 04:37 (100720)

I'm not a doctor, but have been through the cortisone, 2 surgeries and 7 sclerosing injections. My doctor has had great results with the sclerosing, except with me! My suggestion: get to a custom orthotics person asap and try some shoe inserts with metatarsal cushions. Do not have surgery until you can NOT walk. If you research, thoroughly, you will find the surgery is truly only about 30% successful. The most success you will hear is from met pads or sclerosing injections. It does sometimes take up to 7 injections and the sclerosing activity continues for a time...so you may have take the full series of shots and wait 3 or 4 months to see how you are doing. Dr. Z said it is very important to have a met pad placed under the foot after the injections to keep the bones apart!!!!! If your doc hasn't done this, you best bring it up yourself!!

Good luck!

Re: non-surgical treatment of nuroma

Richard, C.Ped on 11/21/02 at 12:11 (100797)

Hi Tom,
If you are speaking of a Morton's neuroma, I would suggest full length custom orthotics with a metatarsal pad. The metatarsal pad lifts and seperates the metatarsal heads which releves the nerve from the squeezing effect.

Also, I would not suggest wider shoes only because I do not want your foot to slide around inside, but rather stretch or have your shoes stretched a little at the ball. This could make a big difference.
Richard, C.Ped

Re: non-surgical treatment of nuroma

Ed Davis, DPM on 11/21/02 at 21:28 (100850)

Tom:
I am all for conservative treatment before surgery under most circumstances. Surgical removal of a neuroma is often less painful than one of the shots you have had, has a reasonably short recovery period, takes about 15 minutes and is usually very successful. There are times when conservative treatment can be worse than surgical treatment and this may be one of them.
Ed

Re: non-surgical treatment of nuroma

Sheila S on 11/20/02 at 04:37 (100720)

I'm not a doctor, but have been through the cortisone, 2 surgeries and 7 sclerosing injections. My doctor has had great results with the sclerosing, except with me! My suggestion: get to a custom orthotics person asap and try some shoe inserts with metatarsal cushions. Do not have surgery until you can NOT walk. If you research, thoroughly, you will find the surgery is truly only about 30% successful. The most success you will hear is from met pads or sclerosing injections. It does sometimes take up to 7 injections and the sclerosing activity continues for a time...so you may have take the full series of shots and wait 3 or 4 months to see how you are doing. Dr. Z said it is very important to have a met pad placed under the foot after the injections to keep the bones apart!!!!! If your doc hasn't done this, you best bring it up yourself!!

Good luck!

Re: non-surgical treatment of nuroma

Richard, C.Ped on 11/21/02 at 12:11 (100797)

Hi Tom,
If you are speaking of a Morton's neuroma, I would suggest full length custom orthotics with a metatarsal pad. The metatarsal pad lifts and seperates the metatarsal heads which releves the nerve from the squeezing effect.

Also, I would not suggest wider shoes only because I do not want your foot to slide around inside, but rather stretch or have your shoes stretched a little at the ball. This could make a big difference.
Richard, C.Ped

Re: non-surgical treatment of nuroma

Ed Davis, DPM on 11/21/02 at 21:28 (100850)

Tom:
I am all for conservative treatment before surgery under most circumstances. Surgical removal of a neuroma is often less painful than one of the shots you have had, has a reasonably short recovery period, takes about 15 minutes and is usually very successful. There are times when conservative treatment can be worse than surgical treatment and this may be one of them.
Ed