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Posted by sheila on 11/28/02 at 02:28 (101309)

Hi,

Doctors, have you ever considered a person's pain to be in their mind? I went to a doctor for heel pain. Just in friendly conversation she mentioned that some of her patients show no symptoms of anything and therefore believes that the pain is in their head.

She didn't feel this way about me. However, I would like to know what you think because I may continue to see this doctor.

Thanks for any responses

Re: doctors

Dr. David S. Wander on 11/29/02 at 14:10 (101423)

I always give the patient the benefit of the doubt. Although it is always possible that a patient's problem is in his/her head, I rarely find this to be the case. It is very easy for a doctor to not be able to treat a patient successfully and then blame it on being 'in the patient's head'. Sometimes there are just some very challenging cases that require the doctor to work a little harder and think a little harder. There can always be a psychological component to any condition, but I've found that most patients have legitimate complaints, even if I'm have a difficult time relieving the symptoms. Blaming it on the patient seems like an easy way out!

Re: doctors

Julie on 11/29/02 at 16:12 (101431)

Sheila, I'm not a doctor, but for what it's worth I doubt that there are many doctors left who would say this, even if they think it (and probably not very many who even think it). Body and mind are not separate entities, and I would think that most doctors now recognise that the two are interconnected and that what happens in either affects both.

Re: doctors

sheila on 11/29/02 at 20:25 (101448)

Thank you Dr. Wander for your response. It was very helpful!

Have you ever seen psychogenic cases? Just like stress can trigger a physiological reaction enough to cause ulcers and shingles. Can foot pain be caused by stress?

I realize that psychogenic pain is real pain and not in the mind. Real pain being caused by a psychological problem.

I hope that this doctor can help me and I don't become one of her 'pain in the mind' patients or just attributing my pain to stress.

Thank you

Re: doctors

Dr. David S. Wander on 11/29/02 at 14:10 (101423)

I always give the patient the benefit of the doubt. Although it is always possible that a patient's problem is in his/her head, I rarely find this to be the case. It is very easy for a doctor to not be able to treat a patient successfully and then blame it on being 'in the patient's head'. Sometimes there are just some very challenging cases that require the doctor to work a little harder and think a little harder. There can always be a psychological component to any condition, but I've found that most patients have legitimate complaints, even if I'm have a difficult time relieving the symptoms. Blaming it on the patient seems like an easy way out!

Re: doctors

Julie on 11/29/02 at 16:12 (101431)

Sheila, I'm not a doctor, but for what it's worth I doubt that there are many doctors left who would say this, even if they think it (and probably not very many who even think it). Body and mind are not separate entities, and I would think that most doctors now recognise that the two are interconnected and that what happens in either affects both.

Re: doctors

sheila on 11/29/02 at 20:25 (101448)

Thank you Dr. Wander for your response. It was very helpful!

Have you ever seen psychogenic cases? Just like stress can trigger a physiological reaction enough to cause ulcers and shingles. Can foot pain be caused by stress?

I realize that psychogenic pain is real pain and not in the mind. Real pain being caused by a psychological problem.

I hope that this doctor can help me and I don't become one of her 'pain in the mind' patients or just attributing my pain to stress.

Thank you