Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

TTS

Posted by Rick M on 12/23/02 at 06:09 (103825)

Would anyone have any suggestions for me? I have TTS and have tried conservative treatments for 3 months.
And was off work for a few weeks went back to work and it got worst. My doctor then wanted to operate and I said
wanted a second opinion so he sent me to another doctor and he felt the need to operate too. I then wanted to
give it more time off of work to see if it would get better before I had it operated on. My job requires me to be on
my feet 8 to 10 hours a day. I went back to the doctor on the 20 of December and told the doctor I thought it got
about 70 % better and now he would not operate and told me to go back to work that it wasn't bad enough to
operate on. I ask him what if it gets worst again because when I am not at work is when it gets better and he said
I would have to find another job. He seem to have the attitude that if it gets better not working than there was nothing
else he could do. I am really confused should I see another doctor or is he right? I don't want to go back to work and
lose everything I have gained improving my foot.

Re: TTS

Sharon W on 12/23/02 at 09:32 (103841)

You're in a difficult situation. You are probably right, that if you go back to your (usual) job on your feet, it will make your TTS worse again. And after that happened, they would probably again be interested in operating on you!

What you want is to keep on getting better, WITHOUT surgery, but that option is not really open to you unless you can find a sit-down job. And my guess is you would probably need to find that sit-down job RIGHT AWAY, because your doctor sounds like he isn't going to sign for any more temporary disability. How frustrating!

Lara (I believe it was) once put together a list of sit-down jobs that people with foot problems might be able to do. If you do a search of this site on her name, you might find it.

I wish I could think of a brilliant solution to this... But all I can do is tell you, I understand where you're coming from -- I'm in a similar situation.

Sharon

Re: TTS

wendyn on 12/23/02 at 14:11 (103850)

Rick - what type of tests have the doctors done on you?

Re: TTS

Libby D on 12/23/02 at 15:02 (103852)

Good luck with a sit down job! I have been at a desk for 4 years now, and I have TTS and I think it has nothing to do with standing up. If it did, why do I have it??
I have been in orthotics now for 2 months, the 1st 3 weeks did wonders, now it's worse than ever. I am thinking about surgery but don't really want to go ewith that, I'm afraid it will bne a waste of time, money, and won't help. That's why I'm looking to see if there are any options, maybe I can get some help from this board.
My other DR told me to have the surgery because if I don't, the nerve will eventually die, does anyone know if this is true??
Good luck to all who suffer from this, I am ready to blow my feet off so I won't have this problem anymore :))

Re: TTS

Sharon W on 12/23/02 at 15:56 (103856)

Libby,

Did you have TTS BEFORE the sit-down job, or the other way around?

Biomechanical problems seem to be made worse by standing up a lot. Both standing AND sitting, however, can be bad if what you have going on is a circulation problem -- and (blood) circulation problems CAN cause TTS. (I know that from personal experience.)

About the nerve eventually dying -- if it is compressed badly enough, for long enough, I believe that is a possibility. But one of the doctors would be a better source for that information...

Good luck to you, and MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Sharon

Re: TTS

Lara T on 12/23/02 at 16:48 (103859)

SHARON wrote: You are probably right, that if you go back to your (usual) job on your feet, it will make your TTS worse again. And after that happened, they would probably again be interested in operating on you!

I agree with both of you. My TTS was brought under control by compression socks. I gave up sports, but can manage about 1/2 hour/day of exercise for flexibility & aerobics. However, one week-end I went out-of-town for some consultation for one of my kids and we did the sightseeing stuff. By the end of the week-end, despite wearing the moderate (as opposed to the mild) compression socks, I was set back 6 mos and crawling around on the floor again. ON the up side, I went back to the life I lived before the 3-day vacation, wore moderate compression socks regularly for quite awhile, and my feet are back to under control. It took several weeks/mos to get back to where I was, but as time goes on I make fewer mistakes, and the mistakes are less and less dramatic.

Re: TTS

Rick M on 12/23/02 at 16:56 (103860)

I had a nerve test done that showed I had nerve damaged. This all started when I fell at work.

Re: TTS

Rick M on 12/23/02 at 17:10 (103861)

I am thinking of seeing another doctor to get his opinion about going back to work, I just don't understand
my doctor , he didn't even want to see me again to see how I was doing, like I was cured.

Re: TTS

wendyn on 12/23/02 at 18:26 (103866)

Rick - is there any chance of getting an MRI? I would really want one done before seriously considering surgery.

Re: TTS

Sharon W on 12/23/02 at 19:27 (103867)

Rick,

I agree with Wendy. If you fell at work and that's how this problem started, it's definitely important to get either an MRI or a diagnostic ultrasound of the foot and ankle. That would (hopefully) show whether you have a buildup of scar tissue (as a result of the fall) that is pressing on that nerve in your tarsal tunnel. If there's something IN there to take out, doctors are usually more inclined to operate. They know that your chances for a full (or at least ALMOST complete) recovery are much better when there is something IN there that they can remove. And the MRI or ultrasound would hopefully show you that.

Merry Christmas!

Sharon

Re: TTS

kay on 12/25/02 at 16:48 (103985)

omg rick. if it gets better by not being on your feet all day then you should thank god and find another job. i had the surgery and had no good outcome what so ever. it only got worse. now i am forced to find a job that i can do without standing AND i still suffer from the pain all the time. in fact it is worse than before the surgery. if you can get by without surgery. do it.
kay

Re: TTS

Carolync on 12/27/02 at 09:59 (104099)

Coming from one who this time last year was in the recovery phase of
surgery for TTS---I strongly encourage the surgery. I did not have
a know lesion or 'Thing' in the tunnel to remove, however upon
exploration from my surgeon, the tunnel was found to contain a
Ganglion cyst larger than his thumb. My relief was immediate.
I still have some residual numbness in the foot from nerve damage
but would consider myself at least 95% improved from my pre surgical state. I walk approximately 1 1/2 miles daily and although my foot does
not always like it, I continue to do it.
I DO NOT ENCOURAGE the Steroid Injections into the Tarsal Tunnel.
That is a very painful procedure with very limited and temporary results.
If surgery had been done on me when sympotms first appeared maybe I would
not have the nerve damage and residual numbness. I vote for aggresive
treatment of this condition.
My First nerve conduction study was negative and in THREE short months,
I had a strongly positive test. I always had a positive 'Tinels' sign
and the feeling of electrical currents going through my foot as well as
a feeling of something bunched up (Such as a sock in a shoe) under the
ball of my foot.
By the way, I was also diagnosed with Bilateral Carpal Tunnel. I had one
side released and the other will happen some day! I theorize that although I am a larger person, my wrist and ankles are small and that maybe this had something to do with my problems.
Good Luck Everyone.

Re: TTS

Carl on 12/27/02 at 12:28 (104107)

Carolyn, I'm glad you got some relief with surgery, but I think if you read a lot of the posts on this site, those who haven't gotten TTS from an injury or have a 'known thing' in the tunnel, have had very poor success with surgery. From what you wrote, you had a 'thing' (the cyst), but apparently it wasn't detected before surgery. I hope everyone with this problem tries everything they can short of surgery before trying surgery.

Re: TTS

wendyn on 12/27/02 at 15:53 (104122)

Carolyn - did you have an MRI?

Re: TTS

Susan R. on 1/03/03 at 11:54 (104704)

Have you tried anti-inflammatory medications to releave pressure on the nerves? Orthodics socks might help too, if your probelm derives from pronotaed ankles. I found that a shoe with a wide 1 inch heel as opposed to flat shoes took pressure of the nerves, but that may be individual. You should see a podiatrist. The podiatrist might also inject cortisome into the inflammed area to provide relief. Can you do any of your job sitting on a high stool instead of standing? An occupational therapist can help you figure out how to adapt your work requirments to your disability. I stongly suggest that find another doctor. Good luck!

Re: TTS

Sharon W on 12/23/02 at 09:32 (103841)

You're in a difficult situation. You are probably right, that if you go back to your (usual) job on your feet, it will make your TTS worse again. And after that happened, they would probably again be interested in operating on you!

What you want is to keep on getting better, WITHOUT surgery, but that option is not really open to you unless you can find a sit-down job. And my guess is you would probably need to find that sit-down job RIGHT AWAY, because your doctor sounds like he isn't going to sign for any more temporary disability. How frustrating!

Lara (I believe it was) once put together a list of sit-down jobs that people with foot problems might be able to do. If you do a search of this site on her name, you might find it.

I wish I could think of a brilliant solution to this... But all I can do is tell you, I understand where you're coming from -- I'm in a similar situation.

Sharon

Re: TTS

wendyn on 12/23/02 at 14:11 (103850)

Rick - what type of tests have the doctors done on you?

Re: TTS

Libby D on 12/23/02 at 15:02 (103852)

Good luck with a sit down job! I have been at a desk for 4 years now, and I have TTS and I think it has nothing to do with standing up. If it did, why do I have it??
I have been in orthotics now for 2 months, the 1st 3 weeks did wonders, now it's worse than ever. I am thinking about surgery but don't really want to go ewith that, I'm afraid it will bne a waste of time, money, and won't help. That's why I'm looking to see if there are any options, maybe I can get some help from this board.
My other DR told me to have the surgery because if I don't, the nerve will eventually die, does anyone know if this is true??
Good luck to all who suffer from this, I am ready to blow my feet off so I won't have this problem anymore :))

Re: TTS

Sharon W on 12/23/02 at 15:56 (103856)

Libby,

Did you have TTS BEFORE the sit-down job, or the other way around?

Biomechanical problems seem to be made worse by standing up a lot. Both standing AND sitting, however, can be bad if what you have going on is a circulation problem -- and (blood) circulation problems CAN cause TTS. (I know that from personal experience.)

About the nerve eventually dying -- if it is compressed badly enough, for long enough, I believe that is a possibility. But one of the doctors would be a better source for that information...

Good luck to you, and MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Sharon

Re: TTS

Lara T on 12/23/02 at 16:48 (103859)

SHARON wrote: You are probably right, that if you go back to your (usual) job on your feet, it will make your TTS worse again. And after that happened, they would probably again be interested in operating on you!

I agree with both of you. My TTS was brought under control by compression socks. I gave up sports, but can manage about 1/2 hour/day of exercise for flexibility & aerobics. However, one week-end I went out-of-town for some consultation for one of my kids and we did the sightseeing stuff. By the end of the week-end, despite wearing the moderate (as opposed to the mild) compression socks, I was set back 6 mos and crawling around on the floor again. ON the up side, I went back to the life I lived before the 3-day vacation, wore moderate compression socks regularly for quite awhile, and my feet are back to under control. It took several weeks/mos to get back to where I was, but as time goes on I make fewer mistakes, and the mistakes are less and less dramatic.

Re: TTS

Rick M on 12/23/02 at 16:56 (103860)

I had a nerve test done that showed I had nerve damaged. This all started when I fell at work.

Re: TTS

Rick M on 12/23/02 at 17:10 (103861)

I am thinking of seeing another doctor to get his opinion about going back to work, I just don't understand
my doctor , he didn't even want to see me again to see how I was doing, like I was cured.

Re: TTS

wendyn on 12/23/02 at 18:26 (103866)

Rick - is there any chance of getting an MRI? I would really want one done before seriously considering surgery.

Re: TTS

Sharon W on 12/23/02 at 19:27 (103867)

Rick,

I agree with Wendy. If you fell at work and that's how this problem started, it's definitely important to get either an MRI or a diagnostic ultrasound of the foot and ankle. That would (hopefully) show whether you have a buildup of scar tissue (as a result of the fall) that is pressing on that nerve in your tarsal tunnel. If there's something IN there to take out, doctors are usually more inclined to operate. They know that your chances for a full (or at least ALMOST complete) recovery are much better when there is something IN there that they can remove. And the MRI or ultrasound would hopefully show you that.

Merry Christmas!

Sharon

Re: TTS

kay on 12/25/02 at 16:48 (103985)

omg rick. if it gets better by not being on your feet all day then you should thank god and find another job. i had the surgery and had no good outcome what so ever. it only got worse. now i am forced to find a job that i can do without standing AND i still suffer from the pain all the time. in fact it is worse than before the surgery. if you can get by without surgery. do it.
kay

Re: TTS

Carolync on 12/27/02 at 09:59 (104099)

Coming from one who this time last year was in the recovery phase of
surgery for TTS---I strongly encourage the surgery. I did not have
a know lesion or 'Thing' in the tunnel to remove, however upon
exploration from my surgeon, the tunnel was found to contain a
Ganglion cyst larger than his thumb. My relief was immediate.
I still have some residual numbness in the foot from nerve damage
but would consider myself at least 95% improved from my pre surgical state. I walk approximately 1 1/2 miles daily and although my foot does
not always like it, I continue to do it.
I DO NOT ENCOURAGE the Steroid Injections into the Tarsal Tunnel.
That is a very painful procedure with very limited and temporary results.
If surgery had been done on me when sympotms first appeared maybe I would
not have the nerve damage and residual numbness. I vote for aggresive
treatment of this condition.
My First nerve conduction study was negative and in THREE short months,
I had a strongly positive test. I always had a positive 'Tinels' sign
and the feeling of electrical currents going through my foot as well as
a feeling of something bunched up (Such as a sock in a shoe) under the
ball of my foot.
By the way, I was also diagnosed with Bilateral Carpal Tunnel. I had one
side released and the other will happen some day! I theorize that although I am a larger person, my wrist and ankles are small and that maybe this had something to do with my problems.
Good Luck Everyone.

Re: TTS

Carl on 12/27/02 at 12:28 (104107)

Carolyn, I'm glad you got some relief with surgery, but I think if you read a lot of the posts on this site, those who haven't gotten TTS from an injury or have a 'known thing' in the tunnel, have had very poor success with surgery. From what you wrote, you had a 'thing' (the cyst), but apparently it wasn't detected before surgery. I hope everyone with this problem tries everything they can short of surgery before trying surgery.

Re: TTS

wendyn on 12/27/02 at 15:53 (104122)

Carolyn - did you have an MRI?

Re: TTS

Susan R. on 1/03/03 at 11:54 (104704)

Have you tried anti-inflammatory medications to releave pressure on the nerves? Orthodics socks might help too, if your probelm derives from pronotaed ankles. I found that a shoe with a wide 1 inch heel as opposed to flat shoes took pressure of the nerves, but that may be individual. You should see a podiatrist. The podiatrist might also inject cortisome into the inflammed area to provide relief. Can you do any of your job sitting on a high stool instead of standing? An occupational therapist can help you figure out how to adapt your work requirments to your disability. I stongly suggest that find another doctor. Good luck!