Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

What does a Neurologist do?

Posted by Marty on 12/30/02 at 16:19 (104316)

What does a Neurologist do? Would they be a possible person that could help with TTS? I need to have a nerve conduction test done and then if the test is positive someone who can help.

So far I have Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgeon. Can't find one of these.

Marty

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

marie e on 12/30/02 at 16:41 (104321)

Marty,

I have had one bad experience with a neurologist and one good one. A good neurologist should be able to tell if there is some other type of neurological problem contributing to your tts. I was sent to the first one because my orthopod thought I might have MS or something similar contributing to my problem maybe my back. TTS is sometimes mistaken as MS. He did order MRIs of my brain and spine. I had some abnormalities in my brain....but that's a long story. I am glad I have been checked from head to toe by neurologist and a cardiologist because now I can focus on learning to live and improve my life with TTS. Do you have any back problems?

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

marie e on 12/30/02 at 16:47 (104324)

I forgot to answer one of your questions....YES a neurologist can arrange for you to have an EMG or will administer it himself. They don't treat TTS, at least mine didn't.

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Sharon W on 12/30/02 at 22:21 (104354)

If a neurologist DOES treat TTS, it is usually just by prescribing drugs like Neurontin. (Are you TAKING Neurontin, by the way?)

Sharon

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Shell D on 12/31/02 at 06:16 (104363)

I've got a question about Neurontin. My rheumatologist prescribed Neurontin for me to help me sleep because he thinks I'm not sleeping 'soundly' through the night. To be honest, I haven't been good about taking it because I just HATE to take medicine that I don't know much about. But is Neurontin also prescribed for PF? If that's the case, I'll get my bottle out tonight!!! Thanks for your help.

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Sharon W on 12/31/02 at 08:25 (104368)

No, Neurontin doesn't help with PF, that I know of; it helps with the pain of TTS. It is very good for nerve pain -- it works for a lot of people.

Your rheumatoloist may have prescribed Neurontin to you for any of the following reasons: (1) just because it does have sedative properties (that's one of its side effects), and it could help you sleep (2) because he thinks you might have restless legs syndrome (which interferes with normal sleep), and Neurontin was found in a recent study to be as effective in treating that as dopamine is (and dopamine has MUCH nastier side effects; Neurontin's side effects are usually mild). (3) It's generally believed that Neurontin will ONLY help with pain if it is nerve pain or chronic pain that has made changes in your nervous system. Your rheumatologist may suspect that you could have developed TTS or some other nerve problem affecting your feet, and he wanted to try you on Neurontin because if the Neurontin HELPS your pain, that would indicate that you DO have some sort of nerve problem going on.

Sharon

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Marty on 12/31/02 at 08:58 (104373)

Yes ..... 1200 milligrams a day. Ok don't need to see one of these guts thanks

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Marty on 12/31/02 at 08:59 (104374)

No back problems that I'm aware of. Sounds like this is not for me thanks

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Marty on 12/31/02 at 09:10 (104375)

What is a EMG?

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

john h on 12/31/02 at 10:28 (104380)

Basically all medications for PF or TTS either reduce pain or inflamtion. they do not cure either condition. If you suffer from chronic pain then it should be treated appropriately because the side effects of pain can be as bad as the disease your are treating.

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Marty on 12/31/02 at 10:31 (104381)

Good point. I'm in that process but just standing in POD's office is bad. Helps with things I must do now.

Marty

Re: What is an EMG

john h on 12/31/02 at 10:32 (104382)

An EMG is an electromyogram and is used to measure muscle activity and gather info about the musclar and nervous system

Re: Tests that Neurologists do

Sharon W on 12/31/02 at 10:35 (104384)

EMG stands for electromyogram -- a test that neurologists do to see how well your nerve conduction to your muscles is working. It is one of the tests usually recommended for people with TTS.

The EMG and NCV are both nerve conduction tests.

Sharon

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

marie e on 12/31/02 at 10:39 (104385)

This site explains the EMG procedure.

http://www.teleemg.com/Chapters/tblcnt.htm

I have had two EMGs. The first one was ordered by my orthopodiatrist. It was a necssary to dx tarsal tunnel. It is not a pleasant experience but not nearly as bad as getting a tooth drilled without novacane. The doctor basically zaps you along nerves. I didn't feel a thing on the bottom of my foot and just above my ankle...I thought he was just poking around. When he did find a nerve that was working I about jerked off the table. The second EMG was conducted by my first neuro...I am not sure why he felt it necessary since the MRI of my spine didn't show active back problems (it did show past problems with some of my discs). He mostly wanted to check some of the nerves in the top of my calves and thighs....I definately felt each jolt. No problems there.

I take 600 mg of neurontin daily....with my body weight I can go up to 900 mg daily which is what we are working towards. The only side affects I have had are headaches. The headaches went away when we increased the amount. Neurontin is actually only approved by the fda for epileptics. Dr's use it for all kinds of nerve conditions because it works for some unknown reason. My brother has MS and has taken it, my sister has a depression disorder and has taken it. It is used to help with stress and anxiety. It helps with spasticity. There is a very good med dictionary on The National Multiple Sclerosis Society site...it's easy to find on the internet. Neurontin has worked very well for me. I had awful pain and numbness in my meta tarsals when this all began...after several months of PT and later neurontin the pain and most of the numbness has gone. Spasticity in my calves is better...I can rest at night. Now my biggest battle is weightbearing pain and weakness, swelling in the tarsal tunnel area, and slight numbness from the bottom of my calf to the bottom of my foot. I still have a battle on my hands dealing with all the emotional side affects. but am getting through it. TTS takes a long time to improve just a little. Try to exercise as much as possible so you don't atrophy....you need your strength. But be careful. I do sit ups and leg lifts and slight stretching with a towel hooked under my foot. I walk every day...short distances like around the block. Afterwards my hubby gives my feet and legs a massage and then I ice as needed. I spent to much time on my butt resting last winter and it really weakened all of my legs.
TTS is like having a part time job.

Re: Tests that Neurologists do

Marty on 12/31/02 at 11:03 (104392)

Oh, ok so if I ask for a NVC I will be getting basically what I need to confirm what I know. I have TTS.

The tapping test and burn around my ankles tells me so, among other symptoms. Just want to confirm.

-Marty

Re: Tests that Neurologists do

Sharon W on 12/31/02 at 11:10 (104393)

Actually, I would ask for both the NCV and the EMG. They are usually done at the same time, as one testing procedure.

Sharon

Re: Tests that Neurologists do

Marty on 12/31/02 at 12:31 (104400)

ok,

thanks

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

marie e on 12/30/02 at 16:41 (104321)

Marty,

I have had one bad experience with a neurologist and one good one. A good neurologist should be able to tell if there is some other type of neurological problem contributing to your tts. I was sent to the first one because my orthopod thought I might have MS or something similar contributing to my problem maybe my back. TTS is sometimes mistaken as MS. He did order MRIs of my brain and spine. I had some abnormalities in my brain....but that's a long story. I am glad I have been checked from head to toe by neurologist and a cardiologist because now I can focus on learning to live and improve my life with TTS. Do you have any back problems?

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

marie e on 12/30/02 at 16:47 (104324)

I forgot to answer one of your questions....YES a neurologist can arrange for you to have an EMG or will administer it himself. They don't treat TTS, at least mine didn't.

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Sharon W on 12/30/02 at 22:21 (104354)

If a neurologist DOES treat TTS, it is usually just by prescribing drugs like Neurontin. (Are you TAKING Neurontin, by the way?)

Sharon

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Shell D on 12/31/02 at 06:16 (104363)

I've got a question about Neurontin. My rheumatologist prescribed Neurontin for me to help me sleep because he thinks I'm not sleeping 'soundly' through the night. To be honest, I haven't been good about taking it because I just HATE to take medicine that I don't know much about. But is Neurontin also prescribed for PF? If that's the case, I'll get my bottle out tonight!!! Thanks for your help.

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Sharon W on 12/31/02 at 08:25 (104368)

No, Neurontin doesn't help with PF, that I know of; it helps with the pain of TTS. It is very good for nerve pain -- it works for a lot of people.

Your rheumatoloist may have prescribed Neurontin to you for any of the following reasons: (1) just because it does have sedative properties (that's one of its side effects), and it could help you sleep (2) because he thinks you might have restless legs syndrome (which interferes with normal sleep), and Neurontin was found in a recent study to be as effective in treating that as dopamine is (and dopamine has MUCH nastier side effects; Neurontin's side effects are usually mild). (3) It's generally believed that Neurontin will ONLY help with pain if it is nerve pain or chronic pain that has made changes in your nervous system. Your rheumatologist may suspect that you could have developed TTS or some other nerve problem affecting your feet, and he wanted to try you on Neurontin because if the Neurontin HELPS your pain, that would indicate that you DO have some sort of nerve problem going on.

Sharon

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Marty on 12/31/02 at 08:58 (104373)

Yes ..... 1200 milligrams a day. Ok don't need to see one of these guts thanks

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Marty on 12/31/02 at 08:59 (104374)

No back problems that I'm aware of. Sounds like this is not for me thanks

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Marty on 12/31/02 at 09:10 (104375)

What is a EMG?

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

john h on 12/31/02 at 10:28 (104380)

Basically all medications for PF or TTS either reduce pain or inflamtion. they do not cure either condition. If you suffer from chronic pain then it should be treated appropriately because the side effects of pain can be as bad as the disease your are treating.

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

Marty on 12/31/02 at 10:31 (104381)

Good point. I'm in that process but just standing in POD's office is bad. Helps with things I must do now.

Marty

Re: What is an EMG

john h on 12/31/02 at 10:32 (104382)

An EMG is an electromyogram and is used to measure muscle activity and gather info about the musclar and nervous system

Re: Tests that Neurologists do

Sharon W on 12/31/02 at 10:35 (104384)

EMG stands for electromyogram -- a test that neurologists do to see how well your nerve conduction to your muscles is working. It is one of the tests usually recommended for people with TTS.

The EMG and NCV are both nerve conduction tests.

Sharon

Re: What does a Neurologist do?

marie e on 12/31/02 at 10:39 (104385)

This site explains the EMG procedure.

http://www.teleemg.com/Chapters/tblcnt.htm

I have had two EMGs. The first one was ordered by my orthopodiatrist. It was a necssary to dx tarsal tunnel. It is not a pleasant experience but not nearly as bad as getting a tooth drilled without novacane. The doctor basically zaps you along nerves. I didn't feel a thing on the bottom of my foot and just above my ankle...I thought he was just poking around. When he did find a nerve that was working I about jerked off the table. The second EMG was conducted by my first neuro...I am not sure why he felt it necessary since the MRI of my spine didn't show active back problems (it did show past problems with some of my discs). He mostly wanted to check some of the nerves in the top of my calves and thighs....I definately felt each jolt. No problems there.

I take 600 mg of neurontin daily....with my body weight I can go up to 900 mg daily which is what we are working towards. The only side affects I have had are headaches. The headaches went away when we increased the amount. Neurontin is actually only approved by the fda for epileptics. Dr's use it for all kinds of nerve conditions because it works for some unknown reason. My brother has MS and has taken it, my sister has a depression disorder and has taken it. It is used to help with stress and anxiety. It helps with spasticity. There is a very good med dictionary on The National Multiple Sclerosis Society site...it's easy to find on the internet. Neurontin has worked very well for me. I had awful pain and numbness in my meta tarsals when this all began...after several months of PT and later neurontin the pain and most of the numbness has gone. Spasticity in my calves is better...I can rest at night. Now my biggest battle is weightbearing pain and weakness, swelling in the tarsal tunnel area, and slight numbness from the bottom of my calf to the bottom of my foot. I still have a battle on my hands dealing with all the emotional side affects. but am getting through it. TTS takes a long time to improve just a little. Try to exercise as much as possible so you don't atrophy....you need your strength. But be careful. I do sit ups and leg lifts and slight stretching with a towel hooked under my foot. I walk every day...short distances like around the block. Afterwards my hubby gives my feet and legs a massage and then I ice as needed. I spent to much time on my butt resting last winter and it really weakened all of my legs.
TTS is like having a part time job.

Re: Tests that Neurologists do

Marty on 12/31/02 at 11:03 (104392)

Oh, ok so if I ask for a NVC I will be getting basically what I need to confirm what I know. I have TTS.

The tapping test and burn around my ankles tells me so, among other symptoms. Just want to confirm.

-Marty

Re: Tests that Neurologists do

Sharon W on 12/31/02 at 11:10 (104393)

Actually, I would ask for both the NCV and the EMG. They are usually done at the same time, as one testing procedure.

Sharon

Re: Tests that Neurologists do

Marty on 12/31/02 at 12:31 (104400)

ok,

thanks