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Printed Peer Review Articles

Posted by KellyC on 1/06/03 at 14:48 (104966)

I'm fighting with my insurance company to have the ESWT treatment done. (Note, I participated in the FDA clinical trials in 1999 and had one foot treated, now I need the other.)

The insurance company is not approving the treatment because they still consider it experimental. They want to see an independent review in a publication (such as the NEJM). Does anyone know of any published reviews?

I was taking Celebrex but have developed a reaction to it, so I'm down to nothing now. I'm miserable.

Thanks!
Kelly

Re: Printed Peer Review Articles

BrianG on 1/06/03 at 17:58 (104976)

Hi Kelly,

Were you healed in the ESWT trial? If so, that should be all the proof the insurance company needs. How can they argue with the fact that the FDA has approved 2 different machines for PF? I'm sorry I can't help with your question. Keep up the good fight!

BrianG

PS: Have you tried Vioxx, or 800mg Ibuprofen for the pain? Also, certain narcotics will relieve the pain, should you want to go that direction. Help is available, only you can decide if the side effets are worth the relief.

Re: Printed Peer Review Articles

kellyc on 1/06/03 at 21:12 (104986)

YES I was healed!!! The stupid insurance company keeps saying that until a peer review study has been done that they think is independent, double blind, yada yada yada, they won't even consider it. I even had a 'hearing' where they were to review all the data and give a recommendation. It was a kangaroo court~ the members were a sales rep and a customer rep. Like they're qualified to make a medical decision! ha!

Anyway, I'm still fighting. I've gotta find these articles though.

Kelly

Re: Printed Peer Review Articles

Dr. A on 1/07/03 at 14:53 (105030)

I am currently gathering and analyzing data for a study.

Re: Printed Peer Review Articles

BrianG on 1/07/03 at 16:43 (105039)

Do you think this might help? It was presented at an International ESWT conferance by Dr. Rompe, ESWT guru.

BrianG

Shockwave Application for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis in Running Athletes – a Prospective, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Trial
Authors: Jan D. Rompe, Jens Decking, Carsten Schöllner, Bernhard Nafe
Institution: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University School of Medicine, Mainz, Germany
AIM:
To assess the efficacy of repeated low-energy shock wave application for chronic fasciitis in runners.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Forty-five running athletes with intractable plantar heel pain were enrolled in a randomized single-blind trial with a parallel-group design and blinded independent observer, to evaluate the efficacy of three applications of 2100 impulses of low-energy shock waves (Group I) compared with placebo treatment (Group II). Followup examinations were done at six months, and at one year after extracorporeal shock wave application. Symptoms had been present from one year to six years. Each patient satisfied numerous inclusion and exclusion criteria before he or she was accepted into this study. The primary efficacy endpoint was reduction of subjects´s self-assessment of pain on first walking in the morning on a visual analog scale (range, 0 - 10 points) at six months after shock wave application.
RESULTS:
After six months self-assessment of pain on first walking in the morning showed a significant reduction from an average seven to 2.1 points in Group I, and from an average seven to 4.7 points in Group II on the visual analog scale. The difference of 2.6 points between both groups was significant six months after the intervention (p= 0.0004, 95% CI: 1.9 - 3.3 points; power > 0.9). Twelve of nineteen patients (63%) of the treatment group versus six of twenty patients (30%) of the sham group reported a >50% improvement. After twelve months 81% of the patients of the treatment group versus 37% of the patients of the placebo group rated accordingly. Co-interventions remained on a comparable, low level in both groups.
CONCLUSION:
The current study showed that three treatments with 2100 impulses of low-energy shock waves were a safe and effective nonsurgical method for treating chronic plantar fasciitis in runners.

Re: Printed Peer Review Articles

BrianG on 1/06/03 at 17:58 (104976)

Hi Kelly,

Were you healed in the ESWT trial? If so, that should be all the proof the insurance company needs. How can they argue with the fact that the FDA has approved 2 different machines for PF? I'm sorry I can't help with your question. Keep up the good fight!

BrianG

PS: Have you tried Vioxx, or 800mg Ibuprofen for the pain? Also, certain narcotics will relieve the pain, should you want to go that direction. Help is available, only you can decide if the side effets are worth the relief.

Re: Printed Peer Review Articles

kellyc on 1/06/03 at 21:12 (104986)

YES I was healed!!! The stupid insurance company keeps saying that until a peer review study has been done that they think is independent, double blind, yada yada yada, they won't even consider it. I even had a 'hearing' where they were to review all the data and give a recommendation. It was a kangaroo court~ the members were a sales rep and a customer rep. Like they're qualified to make a medical decision! ha!

Anyway, I'm still fighting. I've gotta find these articles though.

Kelly

Re: Printed Peer Review Articles

Dr. A on 1/07/03 at 14:53 (105030)

I am currently gathering and analyzing data for a study.

Re: Printed Peer Review Articles

BrianG on 1/07/03 at 16:43 (105039)

Do you think this might help? It was presented at an International ESWT conferance by Dr. Rompe, ESWT guru.

BrianG

Shockwave Application for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis in Running Athletes – a Prospective, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Trial
Authors: Jan D. Rompe, Jens Decking, Carsten Schöllner, Bernhard Nafe
Institution: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University School of Medicine, Mainz, Germany
AIM:
To assess the efficacy of repeated low-energy shock wave application for chronic fasciitis in runners.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Forty-five running athletes with intractable plantar heel pain were enrolled in a randomized single-blind trial with a parallel-group design and blinded independent observer, to evaluate the efficacy of three applications of 2100 impulses of low-energy shock waves (Group I) compared with placebo treatment (Group II). Followup examinations were done at six months, and at one year after extracorporeal shock wave application. Symptoms had been present from one year to six years. Each patient satisfied numerous inclusion and exclusion criteria before he or she was accepted into this study. The primary efficacy endpoint was reduction of subjects´s self-assessment of pain on first walking in the morning on a visual analog scale (range, 0 - 10 points) at six months after shock wave application.
RESULTS:
After six months self-assessment of pain on first walking in the morning showed a significant reduction from an average seven to 2.1 points in Group I, and from an average seven to 4.7 points in Group II on the visual analog scale. The difference of 2.6 points between both groups was significant six months after the intervention (p= 0.0004, 95% CI: 1.9 - 3.3 points; power > 0.9). Twelve of nineteen patients (63%) of the treatment group versus six of twenty patients (30%) of the sham group reported a >50% improvement. After twelve months 81% of the patients of the treatment group versus 37% of the patients of the placebo group rated accordingly. Co-interventions remained on a comparable, low level in both groups.
CONCLUSION:
The current study showed that three treatments with 2100 impulses of low-energy shock waves were a safe and effective nonsurgical method for treating chronic plantar fasciitis in runners.