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TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Posted by Marty on 1/07/03 at 18:26 (105050)

I have suffered from PF and TTS for over 7 years now. In the past I have been able to keep it under control with rest, ice, injections and nuerontin. But now nothing I do is enough. My pod. wants me to have a NCV test done and if it comes back positive then for sure I have some sort of nerve compression correct?

The reason I ask is my Pod. is talking surgery. Is this pretty much the only option I have left? I asked him if he has done many of these and he said 'yes, it's not that common but I have done a few.' Should I be concerned with this remark? He does specialize in foot surgery and you know I have been to 3 pods now and really don't want to start all over again just to find out they don't have much if any experience in this. I have know way of finding anyone that does for the matter.

Thanks,

Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Sharon W on 1/07/03 at 19:32 (105055)

Marty,

Yes, if your nerve conduction studies come back positive for TTS, then (assuming the person doing the tests was competent at his job) you DO have a problem with conduction in your posterior tibial nerve and/or its branches, and you certainly may be a candidate for surgery.

Have you had an MRI or a diagnostic ultrasound, already?

With respect to your pod's level of experience in doing (specifically) TTS surgeries: there are two ways of looking at it.

(1) A surgeon who does LOTS of TTS surgeries -- say, 30 or more in a year, would probably have lots of experience in knowing what works best, and what to avoid. But, such a surgeon would be likely to have a pro-surgery bias and might very well be incined to recommend surgery early on as a solution to TTS. Of course, he would probably be skilled in doing this procedure, but there is a kind of recklessness in that surgically-focused approach to treating TTS that I do not like.

(2) A doctor with less experience doing (specifically) TTS surgeries may still be a very good surgeon, just more cautious about recommending surgery for this particular condition. He may prefer to exhaust all the other options for treatments first, and to do all the applicable medical tests and examinations (just to be as certain as possible that the TTS diagnosis is accurate, and the real problem is not a pinched spinal nerve or something like that). Personally, I LIKE caution, especially when it comes to a surgery as risky and as delicate as this one!

Good luck to you, whatever choice you make. I do understand about TTS pain, and I know there comes a time for some of us when the risk of this surgery seems less terrible than continuing to live with the pain indefinitely. (And I did not suffer for 7 YEARS first -- that's a VERY long time!)

Sharon

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Dr. Z on 1/07/03 at 20:43 (105059)

Ask him for a reference with this procedure

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/08/03 at 11:57 (105093)

Thank you for your really good post!

This doctor seems to me in the 2 years I have going to him to be reluctant to do the surgery without exhausting all possibilities. I'm the one that has had it! In fact some of my earlier posts were a bit miss leading in the fact that some took the posts as meaning my pod was the one wanting to do the surgery without exhausting all other possibilities. That was me having a horrible week and just wanting to get it all over with. Now I have come to my senses a bit thanks to some posts from others. I will only have one foot done at a time not both and I will only have surgery for TTS and not TTS and PF. Ok anyway back to the Pod and his skills. I really don't think he does 30 a year don't think he has 30 total, but my dilemma is do I try and find someone who does that many risking getting someone who I don't know and feel good about? Or go with my pod who could be really skilled and cautious without tons of experience.

Thanks,

Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/08/03 at 12:05 (105096)

Ok

Thanks,

Marty

Ps. I works in the same office with 3 other pod's I guess that could be good or bad. Might be buddies with one who will give him a good ref. or he might be at war with them. LOL

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Sharon W on 1/08/03 at 15:00 (105108)

Marty,

I picked that number, '30 or more per year,' out of thin air. That would be more than one TTS syrgert every two weeks -- a HUGE number, actually! It was just an exaggerated example that I used trying to make a point. The point was that the sort of doctor who would do a LOT of these surgeries is also going to be one who rushes to recommend surgery right away instead of giving other treatments a chance to work for you, first.

It sounds like the doctor you have now is very cautious about resorting to surgery with this condition, and that (I think) is good. My surgeon was very cautious, too. After almost a year of trying everything else available to me (some of them worked for a while, but then it would get worse again) and after having an MRI (which did show I had something abnormal in the TT) and after doing nerve conduction tests that showed slowing in one of the nerves associated with TTS, she STILL did not recommend surgery to me. I was the one who brought up surgery and argued my case until she agreed to do it.

Even then, she made a point of telling me all the risks, warning me that the recovery would be very slow (at least 2-6 months), that a successful result was NOT a sure thing, that I would have a very long scar that would probably thicken as it healed and look 'rather ugly,' etc. I had already looked my surgeon up on the web, learned that no successful malpractice suits had been made against her, knew what her qualifications were. And I did ask her about her past record with this surgery, successes and failures, etc. But to me the most important reason for having her do the surgery was that I TRUSTED her, not just to be a competent surgeon but also to be very thorough in providing after-care. She had been my podiatrist for long enough, at that point, that I trusted her and had a lot of confidence in her. I KNEW she would be as conscientious about after-care as she was about everything else.

By that time I had done a lot of research on TTS. I pretty much knew what I was getting myself into -- and I still wasnted to take the chance.

I had also looked my surgeon up on the web, learned that no successful malpractice suits had ever been made against her, knew what her qualifications were. I went to the surgery center where she does most of her procedures and talked to one of the nurses about her (I don't recommend that you try that, though -- I'm a nurse, so it was fairly easy to get her to talk to me). The nurse there told me that if she ever had to have foot surgery, my surgeon would definitely be her choice to do it.

And I also asked HER about her past record with TTS surgery, successes and failures, etc. I was quite satisfied with her answers -- even though she had not done very MANY of these surgeries (mostly because she will ONLY do them under circumstances similar to mine).

I talked to her, BEFORE the surgery, about exactly what after-care she planned for me -- how often I would see her for follow-up, how long she projected I would be unable to put any weight on my foot, how long before I could drive, walk, etc, what medicine I would be using for pain, what symptoms were indicators of an urgent problem so I should call her, what her treatment would be if I had problems with scar tissue or developed a neuroma. (There are a LOT of things I think a patient should know BEFORE having someone do this surgery on them!)

I should probably add that I think my surgery was SUCCESSFUL.

Sharon

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/08/03 at 17:53 (105120)

Sharon,

Once again great informative post. I'm glad to hear your surgery was a success. Was it both feet? And what was the thing after the surgery that caused you the most pain and for how long did the pain continue? Since you're still posting here I'm assuming your still in the recovery stages??

Thanks for your help,

Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Sharon W on 1/08/03 at 18:30 (105121)

Marty,

My surgery was July 24th, 5 1/2 months ago -- but yes, I guess I'm still recovering, to some extent. The wound is still remodeling somewhat, and I still do my range of motion exercises faithfully to try to discourage the formation of scar tissue.

I had a lot of sharp, STINGING pain in the area of the scar during the first month or so after surgery. But the WORST thing, for me, was not being able to bear weight after the surgery!! I really hated that. I had to rely on other people to help me with the simplest of things... it's a terrible loss of independence, and and while it's happening, it feels like it will NEVER end!

If you want to learn more details about what I experienced immediately after the surgery, please read two recent posts that I wrote (about a month ago) to someone named Leslie. In it, I described what it was like for the first few weeks.

But each surgeon has their own schedules and treatment plans that they follow for after-care, and it may also be different from patient to patient even when they have the SAME surgeon, depending on factors such as age, weight, state of health, and special circumstances. I cannot emphasize that too much. Everyone gives thought to a surgeon's skills while they are performing the foot surgery itself, but that is NOT the whole story, NOT the only important factor in whether your operation will be a success or a failure. Whoever you choose for your surgeon, you do need to talk to him/her AHEAD OF TIME and find out what he/she has in mind for your AFTER-CARE, because IT IS VERY IMPORTANT IN HOW WELL YOU HEAL.

Sharon

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Sharon W on 1/08/03 at 22:33 (105140)

Marty,

To your other question: it was only the right foot. I would never do both feet at the same time.

You mentioned that you have decided NOT to have both feet done at the same time (good decision!!) and have decided not to have a tarsal tunnel release surgery and PF surgery at the same time either. I do have PF in addition to TTS -- it's a common combination -- and my Dr. asked me if I would want her to do both surgeries at the same time. But, my PF wasn't all that much of a problem; in fact, IT seemed to have responded pretty well to all those 'conservative' treatments that didn't work for my TTS. So, I told her 'no'.

And unfortunately, now that I am back to spending somewhat more time on my feet again, my PF has flared up...

Did I make the wrong decision? I don't know. Perhaps if I'd had both procedures done, neither one would have healed properly! (Then again, perhaps I wouldn't be struggling with PF in that foot anymore...)

Sharon

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

chris on 1/09/03 at 10:28 (105160)

Marty,

Hi! I read all the posts here and thought I would add my experience. I suffered from TTS and PF for 11 months prior to having surgery. I had tried all conservative treatments and had begged for the pod to do the surgery or at least cut my foot off because I was having so much pain. In the beginning, (I'm going to try to not sound too confusing here) Feb '00 the pod dx me with pf. In june '00 he deemed me ready for surgery and transferred me to a pod who does surgery. That pod again did the conservative treatments and for some reason suspected TTS. (I had not found this board and had never heard of TTS). I had a positive EMG (or whatever that nerve test was) and was scheduled for TTS and PF surgery in Nov '00.

Recovery consisited of 2 weeks non-weight bearing and another week of a boot cast. I returned to work after 3 weeks. I have mainly a desk job. I was not able to wear a shoe until late Jan '01. Also in Jan '01, I was still having some pain and swelling and sent to Physical Therapy. PT was great and helped.

Now over two years later, I am completely pain free. I do not regret having tts and pf surgery at the same time. In fact the pf surgery was no problem and I can not even tell where the cut was. The tts scar is barely visible.

Now I know not everyone has had successful surgeries. I have no idea why mine worked.

I wish you all the best during this difficult time. If you have any questions feel free to ask.

Oh and by the way. I continue to mostly lurk on this website because sometimes I think it is important for tts sufferers to know that some people have had successful surgeries. I just wish someone could figure it out why!

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

carmen on 1/10/03 at 11:08 (105205)

what are your symptoms if you don't mind me asking??

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/11/03 at 14:09 (105269)

Thanks so much for your post. There is a possibility I will have both TTS and PF surgery done and the same time. I think I will be determining that with my pod here in the next 2 months. I'm going to see if we can nail down the PF for sure first or if all this I feel is just from the TTS. Anyway did you have just one foot done? If so do you think I could go back to work after one week? I have a desk job and people there to help me get things.

Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

chris on 1/13/03 at 08:28 (105346)

I only had TTS and PF in one foot and having both done at the same time worked well for me.

Honestly I think returning to work after one week is not a good idea. You do not want to risk reinjuring your foot, besides you will be in pain after the surgery and unable to drive, walk, shower, pretty much you will be unable to do anything.

Following surgery you will have a half cast and be non-weight bearing on the foot for at least 2 to 3 weeks. SOmetimes more depending on your doctor. The stiches will also remain in for almost all of that time. After the half cast you will be put into a boot cast and allowed to put weight on the foot. It was at this time that I probably could have returned to work but chose not to since I couldn't drive and putting wieght on the foot was quite painful. I returned to my desk during the second week wearing the boot cast but had to have someone drive me to work.

I cannot stress enough to you the importance of heeding your doctor's advice on your recovery time. It could make or break the success of your surgery.

Be certain to explore all your options and get information from folks on this board. Some have had success and some have had failure.

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/13/03 at 11:45 (105357)

One thing I'm wondering about is the cast and boot after surgery. I can't even wear socks at all! I'm sitting at work right now with bare feet under my desk. How will I be able to ware a cast? Won't it be touching the bottom of my feet as well as the sides ????

-Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

chris on 1/13/03 at 12:20 (105360)

I'm not sure what your doctor will do, but I can tell you what mine did.

The PF surgery was really nothing, just a very small incision on the bottom of my heel and was covered with a piece of gauze. The TTS was about a 4' incision that was also covered with gauze and had an open splint cast wrapped with an ace bandage. When they do the surgery alot of nerves are cut so you may have limited feeling at first, everyone is different.

Honestly, I don't ever remember my PF and TTS being so painful that I could not wear a sock on my foot! I just remember not being able to walk without a limp and horrible pain when I stood or walked for any length of time.

You have to remember that surgery outcomes are different for everyone. What is commonly said, is that full recovery can take up to a year and you should heed the advice of your doctor. If he/she says no weight bearing for 2 weeks, he/she means just that. What a sight I must have been crawling up the stairs with my crutches to use the bathroom!

Sounds like you still have a lot of questions. I think I need to reread your posts. It's been a busy day at work!

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Sharon W on 1/07/03 at 19:32 (105055)

Marty,

Yes, if your nerve conduction studies come back positive for TTS, then (assuming the person doing the tests was competent at his job) you DO have a problem with conduction in your posterior tibial nerve and/or its branches, and you certainly may be a candidate for surgery.

Have you had an MRI or a diagnostic ultrasound, already?

With respect to your pod's level of experience in doing (specifically) TTS surgeries: there are two ways of looking at it.

(1) A surgeon who does LOTS of TTS surgeries -- say, 30 or more in a year, would probably have lots of experience in knowing what works best, and what to avoid. But, such a surgeon would be likely to have a pro-surgery bias and might very well be incined to recommend surgery early on as a solution to TTS. Of course, he would probably be skilled in doing this procedure, but there is a kind of recklessness in that surgically-focused approach to treating TTS that I do not like.

(2) A doctor with less experience doing (specifically) TTS surgeries may still be a very good surgeon, just more cautious about recommending surgery for this particular condition. He may prefer to exhaust all the other options for treatments first, and to do all the applicable medical tests and examinations (just to be as certain as possible that the TTS diagnosis is accurate, and the real problem is not a pinched spinal nerve or something like that). Personally, I LIKE caution, especially when it comes to a surgery as risky and as delicate as this one!

Good luck to you, whatever choice you make. I do understand about TTS pain, and I know there comes a time for some of us when the risk of this surgery seems less terrible than continuing to live with the pain indefinitely. (And I did not suffer for 7 YEARS first -- that's a VERY long time!)

Sharon

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Dr. Z on 1/07/03 at 20:43 (105059)

Ask him for a reference with this procedure

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/08/03 at 11:57 (105093)

Thank you for your really good post!

This doctor seems to me in the 2 years I have going to him to be reluctant to do the surgery without exhausting all possibilities. I'm the one that has had it! In fact some of my earlier posts were a bit miss leading in the fact that some took the posts as meaning my pod was the one wanting to do the surgery without exhausting all other possibilities. That was me having a horrible week and just wanting to get it all over with. Now I have come to my senses a bit thanks to some posts from others. I will only have one foot done at a time not both and I will only have surgery for TTS and not TTS and PF. Ok anyway back to the Pod and his skills. I really don't think he does 30 a year don't think he has 30 total, but my dilemma is do I try and find someone who does that many risking getting someone who I don't know and feel good about? Or go with my pod who could be really skilled and cautious without tons of experience.

Thanks,

Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/08/03 at 12:05 (105096)

Ok

Thanks,

Marty

Ps. I works in the same office with 3 other pod's I guess that could be good or bad. Might be buddies with one who will give him a good ref. or he might be at war with them. LOL

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Sharon W on 1/08/03 at 15:00 (105108)

Marty,

I picked that number, '30 or more per year,' out of thin air. That would be more than one TTS syrgert every two weeks -- a HUGE number, actually! It was just an exaggerated example that I used trying to make a point. The point was that the sort of doctor who would do a LOT of these surgeries is also going to be one who rushes to recommend surgery right away instead of giving other treatments a chance to work for you, first.

It sounds like the doctor you have now is very cautious about resorting to surgery with this condition, and that (I think) is good. My surgeon was very cautious, too. After almost a year of trying everything else available to me (some of them worked for a while, but then it would get worse again) and after having an MRI (which did show I had something abnormal in the TT) and after doing nerve conduction tests that showed slowing in one of the nerves associated with TTS, she STILL did not recommend surgery to me. I was the one who brought up surgery and argued my case until she agreed to do it.

Even then, she made a point of telling me all the risks, warning me that the recovery would be very slow (at least 2-6 months), that a successful result was NOT a sure thing, that I would have a very long scar that would probably thicken as it healed and look 'rather ugly,' etc. I had already looked my surgeon up on the web, learned that no successful malpractice suits had been made against her, knew what her qualifications were. And I did ask her about her past record with this surgery, successes and failures, etc. But to me the most important reason for having her do the surgery was that I TRUSTED her, not just to be a competent surgeon but also to be very thorough in providing after-care. She had been my podiatrist for long enough, at that point, that I trusted her and had a lot of confidence in her. I KNEW she would be as conscientious about after-care as she was about everything else.

By that time I had done a lot of research on TTS. I pretty much knew what I was getting myself into -- and I still wasnted to take the chance.

I had also looked my surgeon up on the web, learned that no successful malpractice suits had ever been made against her, knew what her qualifications were. I went to the surgery center where she does most of her procedures and talked to one of the nurses about her (I don't recommend that you try that, though -- I'm a nurse, so it was fairly easy to get her to talk to me). The nurse there told me that if she ever had to have foot surgery, my surgeon would definitely be her choice to do it.

And I also asked HER about her past record with TTS surgery, successes and failures, etc. I was quite satisfied with her answers -- even though she had not done very MANY of these surgeries (mostly because she will ONLY do them under circumstances similar to mine).

I talked to her, BEFORE the surgery, about exactly what after-care she planned for me -- how often I would see her for follow-up, how long she projected I would be unable to put any weight on my foot, how long before I could drive, walk, etc, what medicine I would be using for pain, what symptoms were indicators of an urgent problem so I should call her, what her treatment would be if I had problems with scar tissue or developed a neuroma. (There are a LOT of things I think a patient should know BEFORE having someone do this surgery on them!)

I should probably add that I think my surgery was SUCCESSFUL.

Sharon

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/08/03 at 17:53 (105120)

Sharon,

Once again great informative post. I'm glad to hear your surgery was a success. Was it both feet? And what was the thing after the surgery that caused you the most pain and for how long did the pain continue? Since you're still posting here I'm assuming your still in the recovery stages??

Thanks for your help,

Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Sharon W on 1/08/03 at 18:30 (105121)

Marty,

My surgery was July 24th, 5 1/2 months ago -- but yes, I guess I'm still recovering, to some extent. The wound is still remodeling somewhat, and I still do my range of motion exercises faithfully to try to discourage the formation of scar tissue.

I had a lot of sharp, STINGING pain in the area of the scar during the first month or so after surgery. But the WORST thing, for me, was not being able to bear weight after the surgery!! I really hated that. I had to rely on other people to help me with the simplest of things... it's a terrible loss of independence, and and while it's happening, it feels like it will NEVER end!

If you want to learn more details about what I experienced immediately after the surgery, please read two recent posts that I wrote (about a month ago) to someone named Leslie. In it, I described what it was like for the first few weeks.

But each surgeon has their own schedules and treatment plans that they follow for after-care, and it may also be different from patient to patient even when they have the SAME surgeon, depending on factors such as age, weight, state of health, and special circumstances. I cannot emphasize that too much. Everyone gives thought to a surgeon's skills while they are performing the foot surgery itself, but that is NOT the whole story, NOT the only important factor in whether your operation will be a success or a failure. Whoever you choose for your surgeon, you do need to talk to him/her AHEAD OF TIME and find out what he/she has in mind for your AFTER-CARE, because IT IS VERY IMPORTANT IN HOW WELL YOU HEAL.

Sharon

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Sharon W on 1/08/03 at 22:33 (105140)

Marty,

To your other question: it was only the right foot. I would never do both feet at the same time.

You mentioned that you have decided NOT to have both feet done at the same time (good decision!!) and have decided not to have a tarsal tunnel release surgery and PF surgery at the same time either. I do have PF in addition to TTS -- it's a common combination -- and my Dr. asked me if I would want her to do both surgeries at the same time. But, my PF wasn't all that much of a problem; in fact, IT seemed to have responded pretty well to all those 'conservative' treatments that didn't work for my TTS. So, I told her 'no'.

And unfortunately, now that I am back to spending somewhat more time on my feet again, my PF has flared up...

Did I make the wrong decision? I don't know. Perhaps if I'd had both procedures done, neither one would have healed properly! (Then again, perhaps I wouldn't be struggling with PF in that foot anymore...)

Sharon

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

chris on 1/09/03 at 10:28 (105160)

Marty,

Hi! I read all the posts here and thought I would add my experience. I suffered from TTS and PF for 11 months prior to having surgery. I had tried all conservative treatments and had begged for the pod to do the surgery or at least cut my foot off because I was having so much pain. In the beginning, (I'm going to try to not sound too confusing here) Feb '00 the pod dx me with pf. In june '00 he deemed me ready for surgery and transferred me to a pod who does surgery. That pod again did the conservative treatments and for some reason suspected TTS. (I had not found this board and had never heard of TTS). I had a positive EMG (or whatever that nerve test was) and was scheduled for TTS and PF surgery in Nov '00.

Recovery consisited of 2 weeks non-weight bearing and another week of a boot cast. I returned to work after 3 weeks. I have mainly a desk job. I was not able to wear a shoe until late Jan '01. Also in Jan '01, I was still having some pain and swelling and sent to Physical Therapy. PT was great and helped.

Now over two years later, I am completely pain free. I do not regret having tts and pf surgery at the same time. In fact the pf surgery was no problem and I can not even tell where the cut was. The tts scar is barely visible.

Now I know not everyone has had successful surgeries. I have no idea why mine worked.

I wish you all the best during this difficult time. If you have any questions feel free to ask.

Oh and by the way. I continue to mostly lurk on this website because sometimes I think it is important for tts sufferers to know that some people have had successful surgeries. I just wish someone could figure it out why!

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

carmen on 1/10/03 at 11:08 (105205)

what are your symptoms if you don't mind me asking??

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/11/03 at 14:09 (105269)

Thanks so much for your post. There is a possibility I will have both TTS and PF surgery done and the same time. I think I will be determining that with my pod here in the next 2 months. I'm going to see if we can nail down the PF for sure first or if all this I feel is just from the TTS. Anyway did you have just one foot done? If so do you think I could go back to work after one week? I have a desk job and people there to help me get things.

Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

chris on 1/13/03 at 08:28 (105346)

I only had TTS and PF in one foot and having both done at the same time worked well for me.

Honestly I think returning to work after one week is not a good idea. You do not want to risk reinjuring your foot, besides you will be in pain after the surgery and unable to drive, walk, shower, pretty much you will be unable to do anything.

Following surgery you will have a half cast and be non-weight bearing on the foot for at least 2 to 3 weeks. SOmetimes more depending on your doctor. The stiches will also remain in for almost all of that time. After the half cast you will be put into a boot cast and allowed to put weight on the foot. It was at this time that I probably could have returned to work but chose not to since I couldn't drive and putting wieght on the foot was quite painful. I returned to my desk during the second week wearing the boot cast but had to have someone drive me to work.

I cannot stress enough to you the importance of heeding your doctor's advice on your recovery time. It could make or break the success of your surgery.

Be certain to explore all your options and get information from folks on this board. Some have had success and some have had failure.

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

Marty on 1/13/03 at 11:45 (105357)

One thing I'm wondering about is the cast and boot after surgery. I can't even wear socks at all! I'm sitting at work right now with bare feet under my desk. How will I be able to ware a cast? Won't it be touching the bottom of my feet as well as the sides ????

-Marty

Re: TTS sufferer, looking at surgery.

chris on 1/13/03 at 12:20 (105360)

I'm not sure what your doctor will do, but I can tell you what mine did.

The PF surgery was really nothing, just a very small incision on the bottom of my heel and was covered with a piece of gauze. The TTS was about a 4' incision that was also covered with gauze and had an open splint cast wrapped with an ace bandage. When they do the surgery alot of nerves are cut so you may have limited feeling at first, everyone is different.

Honestly, I don't ever remember my PF and TTS being so painful that I could not wear a sock on my foot! I just remember not being able to walk without a limp and horrible pain when I stood or walked for any length of time.

You have to remember that surgery outcomes are different for everyone. What is commonly said, is that full recovery can take up to a year and you should heed the advice of your doctor. If he/she says no weight bearing for 2 weeks, he/she means just that. What a sight I must have been crawling up the stairs with my crutches to use the bathroom!

Sounds like you still have a lot of questions. I think I need to reread your posts. It's been a busy day at work!