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exercises to increase foot stability? home program requested.

Posted by elena j. on 1/09/03 at 15:36 (105169)

are there gentle home stretches and exercises one can do to increase likelihood of a rehabilitation? toe, ankle and arch strenghteners that will not aggravate the nerves?
i have been home with horrible carpal tunnel syndrome and RSD pain for 1 yaer and this TTS started up 3 months ago, just as i was turning the corner with my hands; i cannot lose my feet too! i'm on mobic and have orthotics (very flat feet), but the pain is increasing and i'm almost completely inactive now...please help. this is too much burden for one little body--thanks.

Re: exercises to increase foot stability? home program requested.

Mike W on 1/10/03 at 08:32 (105196)

Hello Elena,

Check out http://www.foottrainer.com for information on safe, effective toe/foot exercises.

Regards,

Mike W

Re: Give these simple yoga exercises a try

Sharon W on 1/13/03 at 17:58 (105407)

Elena,

I have found these simple exercises helpful, even when my tarsal tunnel syndrome pain was at its worst. I don't know if this will be helpful to you or not, but a lovely lady named Julie, who is a yoga instructor, has posted these 'Yoga foot exercises' to help those with plantar facaetis, and I do think they help with TTS as well. As with any exercises, you should take it easy, at first, slowly building up the number of times you repeat them exercises -- and in any case do NOT do anything that causes a lot of pain.

Here are Julie's 'Yoga foot exercises' (I copied and pasted them from a recent post):

These are simple yoga exercises for the feet. They're part of a series for all the joints called Pawanmuktasana. That means 'energy-releasing exercises', and they release energy by speeding the removal of toxins from the joints. They work systematically and precisely on the joints and on their associated muscles, tendons and ligaments. They can be done sitting on the floor with the legs outstretched (a difficult position to hold, especially for people with low back problems), or lying down, or sitting in a chair, or standing on alternate legs (a non-no for folks with PF). Sitting in a chair and lying down are best.

These exercises can be helpful in cases of plantar fasciitis in several ways.

1. They improve circulation generally. In particular they increase blood flow to the areas being worked on, which promotes healing.

2. They gently stretch the calf muscles and achilles tendons, which in time reduces the strain on the PF.

3. They strengthen the entire musculature of the feet and ankles.

4. They improve range of motion, and help to avoid losing it during the 'down time' of decreased activity.

TOE BENDING AND STRETCHING

This one works the toe joints (all 28 of them) while holding a gentle stretch through the achilles tendons and calf muscles; and works the entire musculature of the feet.

Extend one heel forward and hold this gentle stretch while working on your toes.

Curl your toes forward, as if making fists of your feet. (Don't do this so enthusiastically that you give yourself a cramp.)

Then stretch the toes and spread them: make spaces between them.

Do this nine times, breathing out as you curl the toes, and breathing in as you stretch them.

Repeat with the other foot, then with both feet.

ANKLE BENDING

This one works on the ankle joints and on the achilles/soleus/ gastrocnemuis complex. It helps to increase ankle dorsiflexion, the essential thing for PF-ers who are generally tight in this area.

Bend the feet forwards at the ankles, and then bend them back, one at a time, then together.

Do each nine times on each foot, then both feet, breathing out as you bend forwards, in as you bend back.

ANKLE ROTATIONS

Circle the feet at the ankles, slowly and carefully, nine times in each direction, first one foot, then the other, then both. Breathe freely.

****

If you co-ordinate your movements with your breath it increases their effectiveness because it (a) slows you down and (b) makes you more aware of what you're doing.

I've practised and taught these exercises for many years. They are effective and powerful, and useful for people with PF because they're both non- weight-bearing and specific. And they're very energizing.

I do them in the morning before I get out of bed, and would recommend this to anyone with PF to help avoid the 'first step' pain.

They can be done as many times a day as you like: the more the better. It's good to do them before getting up after sitting for awhile.

I hope you will find these exercises helpful.

All the best for your healing.

Re: exercises to increase foot stability? home program requested.

rickb on 1/22/03 at 06:11 (106252)

if you have rsd then you should read up on that. swim and walk in a pool. it is the best thing for exercise the warmer the water the better. check out this rsd page but dont let it get you down. fight to get over it.
http://www.rsdrx.com/

Re: exercises to increase foot stability? home program requested.

Mike W on 1/10/03 at 08:32 (105196)

Hello Elena,

Check out http://www.foottrainer.com for information on safe, effective toe/foot exercises.

Regards,

Mike W

Re: Give these simple yoga exercises a try

Sharon W on 1/13/03 at 17:58 (105407)

Elena,

I have found these simple exercises helpful, even when my tarsal tunnel syndrome pain was at its worst. I don't know if this will be helpful to you or not, but a lovely lady named Julie, who is a yoga instructor, has posted these 'Yoga foot exercises' to help those with plantar facaetis, and I do think they help with TTS as well. As with any exercises, you should take it easy, at first, slowly building up the number of times you repeat them exercises -- and in any case do NOT do anything that causes a lot of pain.

Here are Julie's 'Yoga foot exercises' (I copied and pasted them from a recent post):

These are simple yoga exercises for the feet. They're part of a series for all the joints called Pawanmuktasana. That means 'energy-releasing exercises', and they release energy by speeding the removal of toxins from the joints. They work systematically and precisely on the joints and on their associated muscles, tendons and ligaments. They can be done sitting on the floor with the legs outstretched (a difficult position to hold, especially for people with low back problems), or lying down, or sitting in a chair, or standing on alternate legs (a non-no for folks with PF). Sitting in a chair and lying down are best.

These exercises can be helpful in cases of plantar fasciitis in several ways.

1. They improve circulation generally. In particular they increase blood flow to the areas being worked on, which promotes healing.

2. They gently stretch the calf muscles and achilles tendons, which in time reduces the strain on the PF.

3. They strengthen the entire musculature of the feet and ankles.

4. They improve range of motion, and help to avoid losing it during the 'down time' of decreased activity.

TOE BENDING AND STRETCHING

This one works the toe joints (all 28 of them) while holding a gentle stretch through the achilles tendons and calf muscles; and works the entire musculature of the feet.

Extend one heel forward and hold this gentle stretch while working on your toes.

Curl your toes forward, as if making fists of your feet. (Don't do this so enthusiastically that you give yourself a cramp.)

Then stretch the toes and spread them: make spaces between them.

Do this nine times, breathing out as you curl the toes, and breathing in as you stretch them.

Repeat with the other foot, then with both feet.

ANKLE BENDING

This one works on the ankle joints and on the achilles/soleus/ gastrocnemuis complex. It helps to increase ankle dorsiflexion, the essential thing for PF-ers who are generally tight in this area.

Bend the feet forwards at the ankles, and then bend them back, one at a time, then together.

Do each nine times on each foot, then both feet, breathing out as you bend forwards, in as you bend back.

ANKLE ROTATIONS

Circle the feet at the ankles, slowly and carefully, nine times in each direction, first one foot, then the other, then both. Breathe freely.

****

If you co-ordinate your movements with your breath it increases their effectiveness because it (a) slows you down and (b) makes you more aware of what you're doing.

I've practised and taught these exercises for many years. They are effective and powerful, and useful for people with PF because they're both non- weight-bearing and specific. And they're very energizing.

I do them in the morning before I get out of bed, and would recommend this to anyone with PF to help avoid the 'first step' pain.

They can be done as many times a day as you like: the more the better. It's good to do them before getting up after sitting for awhile.

I hope you will find these exercises helpful.

All the best for your healing.

Re: exercises to increase foot stability? home program requested.

rickb on 1/22/03 at 06:11 (106252)

if you have rsd then you should read up on that. swim and walk in a pool. it is the best thing for exercise the warmer the water the better. check out this rsd page but dont let it get you down. fight to get over it.
http://www.rsdrx.com/