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Cortisone question Answered!, Sorry!

Posted by Angela S on 1/13/03 at 13:03 (105365)

Hi,
I'm not doing too well with this board yet :-(
I did a search on my question after I posted, and found lots of info.
Sorry to waste peoples time!
I guess my very first post didn't make it to the board.
To summerize I was very glad to find this board. When I initally got on the Net to search for info on TTS I expected only 'dry' information and to feel discouraged.
Even though I still am not sure what the next step is (no pun intended!)
or what all the implications of this disease are I feel better after reading some posts.
I thought I should be 'tougher', that I was being weak.
But now I know it is very hard for others to do simple things, like shopping or standing in line.
And that others miss the things they used to love to do, such as walking, hiking, physical activity.
(I worry about the lack of exercise now and the harm to my body)
But I am still new to this-yet it had been 7 months or so.
Anyway, thank you for being here!

Re: Angela

wendyn on 1/13/03 at 13:58 (105371)

No apologies necessary!

Maybe your first post ended up on another one of the boards here....

Hope you found the information you needed! Have you tried swimming or biking for exercise? (I know it's hard to sit and do nothing).

Re: For Angela

Sharon W on 1/13/03 at 17:42 (105404)

Angela,

I'm glad you found this board, too.

I got a LOT of relief from the cortisone injections for tarsal tunnel syndrome, but (unfortunately) it didn't last. Everyone seems to react differently, though, to the drugs and other treatments used for this problem, and I think the steroids are worth a try -- at least once.

You reminded me of myself when you wrote, 'I thought I should be 'tougher', that I was being weak.' I was really in denial, at first, and I didn't get treatment when I should have. If I'd seen a podiatrist 3 months earlier, perhaps I wouldn't have ended up needing surgery. Getting treatment EARLY is IMPORTANT with this problem -- don't wait around for it to get worse...

You wrote:

'...now I know it is very hard for others to do simple things, like shopping or standing in line.
And that others miss the things they used to love to do, such as walking, hiking, physical activity.
(I worry about the lack of exercise now and the harm to my body)'

Not only is it difficult and painful to do things like walking and hiking with this condition, by trying to be 'tough' and continuing to put stress on your feet and ankles, you may be continuously injuring yourself. It's called a 'repetitive stress injury.'

But you are certainly right that lack of exercise is not good for the body. I always got most of my exercise by doing things on my feet, before I got TTS. Fortunately, there ARE other things you can do to get exercise, as Wendyn suggested, which will not do further injury.

Speedy healing to you! And feel free to come back and 'talk' to us, any time you have questions or comments, or even if you just need to talk to someone who UNDERSTANDS.

Sharon

Re: For Angela

Angela S on 1/14/03 at 19:02 (105499)

Hi sharon,
you wrote :Not only is it difficult and painful to do things like walking and hiking with this condition, by trying to be 'tough' and continuing to put stress on your feet and ankles, you may be continuously injuring yourself. It's called a 'repetitive stress injury.'

I agree, but how do I stop using my feet? :-P
Working consists of being on my feet. Guess I just have lot's to figure out still.

But this is scary! As someone else posted, how does someone get family, friends, and even the doctors to take this seriously?

My family MD just ignored it when I told him, my podiatrist hasn't said anything about it,except that I have it, my family just thinks it's like having a corn
Oh heck I don't know!

What treatment would you have had before the surgery if you had known? I don't know if I am doing everything I should.
I've tried the foot doc's rigid orthotics. Ouch!
I am still on a quest for the right shoes too. A soft flannel blanket is all my feet like being in!
Thanks for the welcome and the input,
Angela

Re: For Angela

Julie on 1/15/03 at 02:05 (105509)

Hello Angela

One way to encourage your friends and family to take TTS seriously is to print out the information in the heel pain book, and in Wendy's FAQ, and ask them to read it. If they get interested, you could then suggest they read some of the posts on the TTS board.

Also, the better informed you yourself are, the better able you will be to explain that what you're suffering is NOT like having a corn!

As far as your podiatrist is concerned, if S/HE isn't taking it seriously, and helping you with it, find another - quickly.

You say your work is 'being on your feet'. That's unfortunate, because Sharon is absolutely right that the more you're on your feet (especially standing, but also walking) the worse. What do you do? Can you switch to sit-down duties?

Re: For Angela

Sharon W on 1/15/03 at 10:06 (105513)

Angela,

I hadn't read your posts about cortisone very closely before, but I see now that you have already had three cortisone injections, and that they gave you some relief but it didn't last very long. That's how it was for me, too. If it was less than a year ago when you had them, it might be better to try other things.

You asked, 'how does someone get family, friends, and even the doctors to take this seriously?'

I wish I had a magic answer for that. Julie had a couple of good suggestions. (You should be aware that the Heel Pain Book is dedicated mostly to plantar facaetis, a condition that is often - but NOT always - combined with TTS. Some of the advice in the Heel Pain Book applies to both conditions, however.)

I have another suggestion: click on this link (for the Curtin Podiatry Encyclopedia) and print off the article on TTS. Print off at least 3 copies. Keep one, and read it yourself (it really is not that hard to read, although there are SOME medical terms in it.) Give one to your family members, and ask them to read it. Give the third one to your family doctor, IF s/he is the kind of person who's open to new information. (Then when your doctor has ANOTHER patient with TTS, s/he might recognize it right away when s/he sees it. S/he would be more knowledgable and understanding about the condition after reading this article.) Most primary care physicians don't know much about TTS, and it's good to educate them if they are willing to learn more.

http://www.curtin.edu.au/curtin/dept/physio/podiatry/encyclopedia/tarsaltunnel/

You asked, 'I agree, but how do I stop using my feet? :-P
Working consists of being on my feet. Guess I just have lot's to figure out still.'

I don't know of any 'magic' answer for that one, either (!) -- and it's a problem that we ALL struggle with, I think, to one extent or another. All you can do is keep the amount of time you spend on your feet to an absolute MINIMUM. For example, I learned to plan out all the things I needed to do along the way BEFORE I walked from one end of the house to the other, so that I would only have to make one trek. And if someone else can shop for you, ask them to do it. If not, plan your shopping trips for times when the store will not be too busy, so that you can get in and out of there quickly and won't have to stand in long checkout lines. Try to avoid standing in lines -- standing is one of the WORST things for TTS. Have someone else do it for you -- or in the case of ticket lines, buy them ahead of time. Keep a high stool in the kitchen, and sit on it as much as possible while you cook. Etc.

Concerning treatments I wish I had tried before surgery: I did try almost all of them, but I wish I had been doing more than one thing at a time. I think it's smart to hit TTS with everything you can, all at once, and NOT to just try one thing, wait to see if it will cure you, then try another... Some foot specialists (mine included) do prefer to try one treatment at a time, so they will be able to tell which one WORKED. That is helpful for the doctor, because it gives them an idea what treatments are likely to be more effective, and it helps them to treat other patients in the future with similar problems. But it is NOT necessarily more helpful for the PATIENT, who wants relief as soon as possible and needs to get TTS under control before it becomes harder to cure.

It really is not that simple, anyway, because what works for one person may not help another person AT ALL. The cause of your TTS is an important factor in which treatment is likely to be most effective. If you're a pronator, or have a very low arch, you should try to find some orthotics that will work for you. (Not all orthotics are the hard, rigid kind that it sounds like you have already tried and given up on. Podiatrists usually try to get you to wear those rigid 'ice-scrapers,' and they actually WORK for some people, but a lot of patients with serious foot pain can't tolerate them. A pedorthist can make you soft ones that you may have better luck with.) If your problem is varicose veins, compression hose might be an effective treatment. If you have something IN your tarsal tunnel that could be taken out (which would hopefully show up on an MRI with illumination of the foot and ankle, or on a diagnostic ultrasound), then surgery is more likely to be successful. If you have developed scar tissue or something is stuck together, then sometimes physical therapy techniques such as iontophoresis or therapeutic ultrasound, and/or specialized massage techniques such as ART, can be very effective. If the problem is really inflammation, then taking anti-inflammatory drugs such as Motrin, Celebrex, Vioxx, or Bextra may improve your condition over time.

Those anti-inflammatory drugs can also help you handle the pain. But don't suffer in silence if they don't provide enough pain relief to make you reasonably comfortable. There are other drugs, such as Elavil and Neurontin, that can help with the pain and are NOT narcotics, nor are they really addictive. If your pain is REALLY intense, some doctors will prescribe Ultram, which combines well with Neurontin and can be used as a 'breakthrough' pain medicine that you take ONLY when it gets really bad. If the TTS pain is keeping you awake at night (a problem that I think most of us have, at one time or another), taking Neurontin and Elavil at night will help -- and if you STILL can't sleep, you should ask your doctor about a prescription sleep aid such as Ambien. Many doctors will never OFFER these drugs to you, even if you complain that you're in lots of pain, but they may prescribe them for you IF YOU ASK for them. (It's often important to be assertive with your doctors, especially when you have a painful condition like this, because 'the squeaky wheel gets the grease'.)

To further your quest for the perfect shoes, I suggest you post on the Shoes board; there are pedorthists who answer questions there, as well as a lot of people with foot pain who have tried them all and have developed opinions about which shoes are best! But, until you FIND those perfect shoes -- considering that a 'flannel blanket' is all your feet feel like being in -- have you checked into men's shoes? They usually have a lot more padding than women's shoes do. (But of course, men's shoes are wider, so if your foot is narrow that suggestion won't work for you.)

Sorry to be so long-winded! This is a lot of information to try to absorb at once.

Hang in there, Angela! Most people DO get better from TTS, without needing surgery. It can get really frustrating and discouraging when you feel better for a while and then have some 'bad' days, but try not to let it really get you down. That is the usual pattern with TTS -- '3 steps forward, 2 steps back'. Because of that, sometimes it can be hard to even tell what the overall trend IS -- whether you're getting better or worse --that's why keeping a pain journal is helpful for a lot of people. (You might give it a try...)

Sharon

Re: For Angela

Angela S on 1/15/03 at 12:03 (105516)

HI,
I do home health care-for the elderly-housecleaning-keeping, cooking errands.
I used to do decorative painting-standing, ladders, ceiling work-couldn't take the pain as I have been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. It also hurts to sit for long periods. Standing and moving around WAS much better for me.
I feel like my work options are shrinking rapidly-but I try to have faith that even though I don't know the answers it can still all work out.
Angela

Re: For Angela

Angela S on 1/15/03 at 12:27 (105519)

Sharon,
Thank you for all the information. I will print the link out (a few times) . Heck, I am printing your post !
I plan to see my chiropractor. They are very nice people who want to help.
I am a big believer in the simple things helping. My chiro relieved what was diagnosed as Tarpal Tunnel.
Guys shoes are great but I have small feet so they are hard to find in a small size. Finding comfotable shoes is my eternal quest!
I take Neurotin, Vioxx and now Trazadone at night to keep me asleep :-)
Do you know if anyone has tried muscle relaxers and if they help them? it does for me but they are addicting and also too many side effect-almost like drinking too much so I only take it when I'm at the end of my rope.
Thanks for the tip on asking doctors for what you need. I am slowly learning to be more assertive.
I'm still not convinced I have TTS. Perhaps it is something else like PF.
Or perhaps the Neurotin, which I was taking before this started caused edema which caused the TTS!?
I will ask that question to the Docots on tis board.
Thanks again,
Angela

Re: For Angela

Sharon W on 1/15/03 at 13:24 (105524)

Angela,

Seeing your chiropractor is a good idea. There is a massage technique called A.R.T. that some chiropractors do which has helped several people on these foot boards -- even people with TTS.

There is a lady, Catherine L, who posted recently that she believes muscle relaxers were an important part of her healing from plantar facaetis (without needing surgery). Those drugs aren't COMMONLY prescribed for TTS, but if they seem to help you... that's the important thing.

The symptoms for plantar facaetis and TTS are a lot alike, and it can be REALLY hard to tell them apart. A lot of people have BOTH -- like I do -- and that makes it ever HARDER to figure out which is which! One thing that can help doctors to figure out whether you really do have TTS, or not, is nerve conduction tests -- the kind that you go to a neurologist for. A negative (normal) result on those tests can't really prove that you DON'T have TTS, because they won't necessarily pick up on it until it's pretty far advanced. But IF you nerve conduction tests do show positive (abnormal) for TTS, then you almost certainly DO have it.

How was your TTS diagnosed? Has anyone ever done nerve conduction tests on your ankle(s) and calves?

I've never heard of Neurontin causing a lot of edema, but of course an (allergic) inflammation reaction is possible with almost ANY medication, so I suppose it's possible.

There is one of these message boards, 'Ask the Foot Doctors,' that's dedicated to questions like the one you want to ask about Neurontin. I would post the question there.

Good luck with all this!

Sharon

Re: Angela

Angela S on 1/15/03 at 19:39 (105556)

Hi Wendy,
Sorry I didn't respond sooner but I didn't want to sound so negative about exercise!
I never liked swimming as an adult. Unless it is hot,hot,hot and I have the pool (or lake) to myself.
I have a bike. Tried riding it once around here, walked it home huffing and puffing These hills here are bigger than I thought. And it is way too cold to ride now.
May just have to do some exercises in the house. Leg lifts, whatever!Though it is boring. Oh Well,
Angela
Angela

Re: Angela

wendyn on 1/13/03 at 13:58 (105371)

No apologies necessary!

Maybe your first post ended up on another one of the boards here....

Hope you found the information you needed! Have you tried swimming or biking for exercise? (I know it's hard to sit and do nothing).

Re: For Angela

Sharon W on 1/13/03 at 17:42 (105404)

Angela,

I'm glad you found this board, too.

I got a LOT of relief from the cortisone injections for tarsal tunnel syndrome, but (unfortunately) it didn't last. Everyone seems to react differently, though, to the drugs and other treatments used for this problem, and I think the steroids are worth a try -- at least once.

You reminded me of myself when you wrote, 'I thought I should be 'tougher', that I was being weak.' I was really in denial, at first, and I didn't get treatment when I should have. If I'd seen a podiatrist 3 months earlier, perhaps I wouldn't have ended up needing surgery. Getting treatment EARLY is IMPORTANT with this problem -- don't wait around for it to get worse...

You wrote:

'...now I know it is very hard for others to do simple things, like shopping or standing in line.
And that others miss the things they used to love to do, such as walking, hiking, physical activity.
(I worry about the lack of exercise now and the harm to my body)'

Not only is it difficult and painful to do things like walking and hiking with this condition, by trying to be 'tough' and continuing to put stress on your feet and ankles, you may be continuously injuring yourself. It's called a 'repetitive stress injury.'

But you are certainly right that lack of exercise is not good for the body. I always got most of my exercise by doing things on my feet, before I got TTS. Fortunately, there ARE other things you can do to get exercise, as Wendyn suggested, which will not do further injury.

Speedy healing to you! And feel free to come back and 'talk' to us, any time you have questions or comments, or even if you just need to talk to someone who UNDERSTANDS.

Sharon

Re: For Angela

Angela S on 1/14/03 at 19:02 (105499)

Hi sharon,
you wrote :Not only is it difficult and painful to do things like walking and hiking with this condition, by trying to be 'tough' and continuing to put stress on your feet and ankles, you may be continuously injuring yourself. It's called a 'repetitive stress injury.'

I agree, but how do I stop using my feet? :-P
Working consists of being on my feet. Guess I just have lot's to figure out still.

But this is scary! As someone else posted, how does someone get family, friends, and even the doctors to take this seriously?

My family MD just ignored it when I told him, my podiatrist hasn't said anything about it,except that I have it, my family just thinks it's like having a corn
Oh heck I don't know!

What treatment would you have had before the surgery if you had known? I don't know if I am doing everything I should.
I've tried the foot doc's rigid orthotics. Ouch!
I am still on a quest for the right shoes too. A soft flannel blanket is all my feet like being in!
Thanks for the welcome and the input,
Angela

Re: For Angela

Julie on 1/15/03 at 02:05 (105509)

Hello Angela

One way to encourage your friends and family to take TTS seriously is to print out the information in the heel pain book, and in Wendy's FAQ, and ask them to read it. If they get interested, you could then suggest they read some of the posts on the TTS board.

Also, the better informed you yourself are, the better able you will be to explain that what you're suffering is NOT like having a corn!

As far as your podiatrist is concerned, if S/HE isn't taking it seriously, and helping you with it, find another - quickly.

You say your work is 'being on your feet'. That's unfortunate, because Sharon is absolutely right that the more you're on your feet (especially standing, but also walking) the worse. What do you do? Can you switch to sit-down duties?

Re: For Angela

Sharon W on 1/15/03 at 10:06 (105513)

Angela,

I hadn't read your posts about cortisone very closely before, but I see now that you have already had three cortisone injections, and that they gave you some relief but it didn't last very long. That's how it was for me, too. If it was less than a year ago when you had them, it might be better to try other things.

You asked, 'how does someone get family, friends, and even the doctors to take this seriously?'

I wish I had a magic answer for that. Julie had a couple of good suggestions. (You should be aware that the Heel Pain Book is dedicated mostly to plantar facaetis, a condition that is often - but NOT always - combined with TTS. Some of the advice in the Heel Pain Book applies to both conditions, however.)

I have another suggestion: click on this link (for the Curtin Podiatry Encyclopedia) and print off the article on TTS. Print off at least 3 copies. Keep one, and read it yourself (it really is not that hard to read, although there are SOME medical terms in it.) Give one to your family members, and ask them to read it. Give the third one to your family doctor, IF s/he is the kind of person who's open to new information. (Then when your doctor has ANOTHER patient with TTS, s/he might recognize it right away when s/he sees it. S/he would be more knowledgable and understanding about the condition after reading this article.) Most primary care physicians don't know much about TTS, and it's good to educate them if they are willing to learn more.

http://www.curtin.edu.au/curtin/dept/physio/podiatry/encyclopedia/tarsaltunnel/

You asked, 'I agree, but how do I stop using my feet? :-P
Working consists of being on my feet. Guess I just have lot's to figure out still.'

I don't know of any 'magic' answer for that one, either (!) -- and it's a problem that we ALL struggle with, I think, to one extent or another. All you can do is keep the amount of time you spend on your feet to an absolute MINIMUM. For example, I learned to plan out all the things I needed to do along the way BEFORE I walked from one end of the house to the other, so that I would only have to make one trek. And if someone else can shop for you, ask them to do it. If not, plan your shopping trips for times when the store will not be too busy, so that you can get in and out of there quickly and won't have to stand in long checkout lines. Try to avoid standing in lines -- standing is one of the WORST things for TTS. Have someone else do it for you -- or in the case of ticket lines, buy them ahead of time. Keep a high stool in the kitchen, and sit on it as much as possible while you cook. Etc.

Concerning treatments I wish I had tried before surgery: I did try almost all of them, but I wish I had been doing more than one thing at a time. I think it's smart to hit TTS with everything you can, all at once, and NOT to just try one thing, wait to see if it will cure you, then try another... Some foot specialists (mine included) do prefer to try one treatment at a time, so they will be able to tell which one WORKED. That is helpful for the doctor, because it gives them an idea what treatments are likely to be more effective, and it helps them to treat other patients in the future with similar problems. But it is NOT necessarily more helpful for the PATIENT, who wants relief as soon as possible and needs to get TTS under control before it becomes harder to cure.

It really is not that simple, anyway, because what works for one person may not help another person AT ALL. The cause of your TTS is an important factor in which treatment is likely to be most effective. If you're a pronator, or have a very low arch, you should try to find some orthotics that will work for you. (Not all orthotics are the hard, rigid kind that it sounds like you have already tried and given up on. Podiatrists usually try to get you to wear those rigid 'ice-scrapers,' and they actually WORK for some people, but a lot of patients with serious foot pain can't tolerate them. A pedorthist can make you soft ones that you may have better luck with.) If your problem is varicose veins, compression hose might be an effective treatment. If you have something IN your tarsal tunnel that could be taken out (which would hopefully show up on an MRI with illumination of the foot and ankle, or on a diagnostic ultrasound), then surgery is more likely to be successful. If you have developed scar tissue or something is stuck together, then sometimes physical therapy techniques such as iontophoresis or therapeutic ultrasound, and/or specialized massage techniques such as ART, can be very effective. If the problem is really inflammation, then taking anti-inflammatory drugs such as Motrin, Celebrex, Vioxx, or Bextra may improve your condition over time.

Those anti-inflammatory drugs can also help you handle the pain. But don't suffer in silence if they don't provide enough pain relief to make you reasonably comfortable. There are other drugs, such as Elavil and Neurontin, that can help with the pain and are NOT narcotics, nor are they really addictive. If your pain is REALLY intense, some doctors will prescribe Ultram, which combines well with Neurontin and can be used as a 'breakthrough' pain medicine that you take ONLY when it gets really bad. If the TTS pain is keeping you awake at night (a problem that I think most of us have, at one time or another), taking Neurontin and Elavil at night will help -- and if you STILL can't sleep, you should ask your doctor about a prescription sleep aid such as Ambien. Many doctors will never OFFER these drugs to you, even if you complain that you're in lots of pain, but they may prescribe them for you IF YOU ASK for them. (It's often important to be assertive with your doctors, especially when you have a painful condition like this, because 'the squeaky wheel gets the grease'.)

To further your quest for the perfect shoes, I suggest you post on the Shoes board; there are pedorthists who answer questions there, as well as a lot of people with foot pain who have tried them all and have developed opinions about which shoes are best! But, until you FIND those perfect shoes -- considering that a 'flannel blanket' is all your feet feel like being in -- have you checked into men's shoes? They usually have a lot more padding than women's shoes do. (But of course, men's shoes are wider, so if your foot is narrow that suggestion won't work for you.)

Sorry to be so long-winded! This is a lot of information to try to absorb at once.

Hang in there, Angela! Most people DO get better from TTS, without needing surgery. It can get really frustrating and discouraging when you feel better for a while and then have some 'bad' days, but try not to let it really get you down. That is the usual pattern with TTS -- '3 steps forward, 2 steps back'. Because of that, sometimes it can be hard to even tell what the overall trend IS -- whether you're getting better or worse --that's why keeping a pain journal is helpful for a lot of people. (You might give it a try...)

Sharon

Re: For Angela

Angela S on 1/15/03 at 12:03 (105516)

HI,
I do home health care-for the elderly-housecleaning-keeping, cooking errands.
I used to do decorative painting-standing, ladders, ceiling work-couldn't take the pain as I have been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. It also hurts to sit for long periods. Standing and moving around WAS much better for me.
I feel like my work options are shrinking rapidly-but I try to have faith that even though I don't know the answers it can still all work out.
Angela

Re: For Angela

Angela S on 1/15/03 at 12:27 (105519)

Sharon,
Thank you for all the information. I will print the link out (a few times) . Heck, I am printing your post !
I plan to see my chiropractor. They are very nice people who want to help.
I am a big believer in the simple things helping. My chiro relieved what was diagnosed as Tarpal Tunnel.
Guys shoes are great but I have small feet so they are hard to find in a small size. Finding comfotable shoes is my eternal quest!
I take Neurotin, Vioxx and now Trazadone at night to keep me asleep :-)
Do you know if anyone has tried muscle relaxers and if they help them? it does for me but they are addicting and also too many side effect-almost like drinking too much so I only take it when I'm at the end of my rope.
Thanks for the tip on asking doctors for what you need. I am slowly learning to be more assertive.
I'm still not convinced I have TTS. Perhaps it is something else like PF.
Or perhaps the Neurotin, which I was taking before this started caused edema which caused the TTS!?
I will ask that question to the Docots on tis board.
Thanks again,
Angela

Re: For Angela

Sharon W on 1/15/03 at 13:24 (105524)

Angela,

Seeing your chiropractor is a good idea. There is a massage technique called A.R.T. that some chiropractors do which has helped several people on these foot boards -- even people with TTS.

There is a lady, Catherine L, who posted recently that she believes muscle relaxers were an important part of her healing from plantar facaetis (without needing surgery). Those drugs aren't COMMONLY prescribed for TTS, but if they seem to help you... that's the important thing.

The symptoms for plantar facaetis and TTS are a lot alike, and it can be REALLY hard to tell them apart. A lot of people have BOTH -- like I do -- and that makes it ever HARDER to figure out which is which! One thing that can help doctors to figure out whether you really do have TTS, or not, is nerve conduction tests -- the kind that you go to a neurologist for. A negative (normal) result on those tests can't really prove that you DON'T have TTS, because they won't necessarily pick up on it until it's pretty far advanced. But IF you nerve conduction tests do show positive (abnormal) for TTS, then you almost certainly DO have it.

How was your TTS diagnosed? Has anyone ever done nerve conduction tests on your ankle(s) and calves?

I've never heard of Neurontin causing a lot of edema, but of course an (allergic) inflammation reaction is possible with almost ANY medication, so I suppose it's possible.

There is one of these message boards, 'Ask the Foot Doctors,' that's dedicated to questions like the one you want to ask about Neurontin. I would post the question there.

Good luck with all this!

Sharon

Re: Angela

Angela S on 1/15/03 at 19:39 (105556)

Hi Wendy,
Sorry I didn't respond sooner but I didn't want to sound so negative about exercise!
I never liked swimming as an adult. Unless it is hot,hot,hot and I have the pool (or lake) to myself.
I have a bike. Tried riding it once around here, walked it home huffing and puffing These hills here are bigger than I thought. And it is way too cold to ride now.
May just have to do some exercises in the house. Leg lifts, whatever!Though it is boring. Oh Well,
Angela
Angela