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goodfeet

Posted by jeff A on 1/21/03 at 19:57 (106204)

I am a practicing chiropractor and own two goodfeet stores. There seems to be some unanswered questions that I may be able to shed some light on.

When not to visit a goodfeet store or seek self 'treatment' with OTC orthopedic devices, arch suuports etc.
If you are diabetic, have peripheral neuropathy and or decreased circulation, have a foot deformity congenital or from injury, have a anatomic(true) short let , are currently under a doctors care for foot ankle knee hip ailment, have open sores or ulcerations on your lower extremities, have pain at night or in bed, recent surgery( not released by your doctor or physical therapist), unrelenting pain not improved with rest.. You should get the idea. In these situations or if you are unsure, PLEASE see a qualified healthcare professional.

The goodfeet stores were never intended to compete with the medical profession. If anything it has increased the awareness of the importance of arch supports and their benefit through high visibilty and advertising.

Our business niche is a retail setting with customer service carrying high quality arch supports, cushions and shoes. You can try them all on in the store. We have had people take long walks from the store to test them before buying. The 'sales people are trained in how to present and fit them properly. The rest is up to you. If a customer asks if any of our products can fix their particular problem(for example plantar fascitis) they are told only what they have heard from other custmers and use this knowledge to recomend various products for the customer to try in the store. They follow up by phone with every customer.

If you don't have insurance coverage, regardless of what you have read, you may save money and you will not get a lifetime warranty anywhere else. In my office when I sold custom footleveler orthotics, by the time you paid exam and follow up visits and product cost you were looking at $300- $400 for one pair of orthotics that you couldn't try first or exchange.

If anybody has had a bad experience with an aggressive salesperson, please contact the store manager or owner, they will want to know. If you are not satisfied with your products, please come back to the store and allow us to resize, try different products or receive store credit( sorry, we are not Nordstoms).

I really appreciate reading the comments and experiences people have had because it helps me understand our customers needs and make appropriate changes. Please feel free to contact me with specific questions or post them.

One last thing. The stores are independently owned dealerships. I speak for myself and my own stores. We set our own prices based on geographic costs and what the market will bear. There is enough competition in this industry that I really don't think anybody can get 'ripped off'. Please shop around. We offer service and quality and I believe we are competitve in that market. Our success and customer satisfaction show that.

Jeffrey A. Ando, D.C.
Doctor of Chiropractic
(email removed)

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/21/03 at 20:21 (106207)

Thanks Jeff!

I don't know if I have every seen a goodfeet store (I live in Canada).

Do you have a sign up in the store that explains all of the conditions that signify that a person should NOT purchase something from your store?

Re: goodfeet

Richard, C.Ped on 1/22/03 at 08:59 (106272)

I like your post Jeff. You can not speak for the store in my area, just like I can not speak for other C.Peds who may practice in a shady way. There is always those out there that will give your business a bad name. I do however, think that $250 is still way to steep for an off the shelf orthosis. You would be very suprised how many people are getting ripped off with fly-by-night orthotic people. Especially the elderly diabetic community.

I will say that if someone does not have insurance or if their insurance does not cover orthotics...I always give discounts. I basically do not have a set price. I go by what the insurance allows or provide my own discounts. I never ever charge someone $250-$400 out of their pocket. I would not be able to pay that myself. When I do give discounts, I let my patients split up the payment to make it easier on them.

I treat my customers the way I wish to be treated. A little naive? Maybe. I guess that is why I get so angry when somone is not willing to help me out financially. I guess I do not understand why others do not do this, but not all businesses are the same.

Richard

Re: goodfeet

Jeff A. on 1/22/03 at 11:43 (106301)

Wendyn, there are stores in Canada, go to the website http://www.goodfeet.com and search locations.

Isn't there medical coverage through the government in Canada? Does it cover orthotics? In a previous post you mentioned your diagnosis. Who diagnosed you and did they recomend orthotics? It sounds like a pretty thorough diagnosis. You could see that doctor again or get another opinion, RSD is a serious condition. It sounds like you need custom orthotics or at least some guidance, rigid vs. semi-rigid etc.
Also, maybe richard C.Ped can post some criteria for finding a good C.Ped, he sounds like a knowledgible professional.

Jeff

Re: goodfeet

Ed Davis, DPM on 1/22/03 at 15:27 (106345)

Perhaps there are differences in which the owners conduct there business.
I have to wonder about the warranty. Prefab orthotics just do not work for a lot of patients. Patients in my area who have no success with the devices and who, in my opinion, have basically been mis-fit cannot get there money back -- they are out several hundred dollars. They are allowed to exchange for shoes though.

There is a lot more to orhtotics than just providing a device that seems to fit the foot. One must have an understanding of foot function and what the desired effect of the device is to be. How can that be done by a salesperson?
Ed

Re: goodfeet

D.Thomas on 1/22/03 at 16:34 (106362)

Excellent information Jeff.

I have had a visit to the 'goodfeet store' by my house and they are not at all operated how you put it here. I was just testing them out by telling them my problems I was having and showed them my existing orthotics. I couldn't believe this, but the salesman actually told me his orthotics were better than my prescription made orthotics. I played dumb and asked him why, and I have to say everything out of his month was complete BS. I just left the store and didn't say anything. Of course, they were also the most expensive orthotics they sold.

I have to say after looking at the orthotics and what was explained to me about them, I do not see what the difference between your most expensive orthotics and 'Powerstep Orthotics' for $30. But, that is my opinion.

Re: goodfeet

D.Thomas on 1/22/03 at 16:52 (106364)

I will also admit that I have been to Podiatrists that sold me orthotics that are now ice scrapers for my car.

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/22/03 at 19:24 (106388)

Thanks Jeff -

Orthotics are not covered by our provincial health care, but some people have additional Blue Cross coverage that does pay for a portion (myself included).

I have had several pairs of orthotics - some good and some bad. I am very happy with the pair I have right now.

My questions were of a general nature about the good feet stores - not because I thought that it was practical or reasonable for me to expect to go there. In my case, an over the counter orthotic would not be the best thing.

My various conditions have been diagnosed or confirmed by a sports medicine doctor, and an a couple podiatrists. Not all the conditions ocurred or were diagnosed at the same time.

Yes - they all recommended orthotics for me.

RSD is a serious (and painful!) condition - but thankfully mine seems to be mostly in a state of remission.

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/22/03 at 19:26 (106389)

ps - Jeff - missed the answer to the question, do you have a sign up in your store with all of the information you posted here (about who should be seeing their doctor instead?)

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/22/03 at 19:28 (106390)

Sorry - typing too fast for my brain - not that it matters much, but the RSD diagnosis was actually made by a foot and ankle orthepedic surgeon.

Re: goodfeet

Jeff A. on 1/22/03 at 23:23 (106411)

Wendyn,
It would be a very big sign. We post a warning about diabetes and cover the others with the question are you currently under a doctors care for any conditions?
Jeff

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/23/03 at 08:49 (106437)

Jeff - bear with me a little longer (I can really be a pain in the a^& sometimes when I'm tryingt understand something- it's not personal).......

Part of my scattered train of thinking is, what would happen if someone is suffering from some big foot pain, and goes to your store looking for relief RATHER than seeing a doctor first?

I would have to suspect that this is your target market, since most doctors are not going to send patients to your store (they will write them a prescription for custom orthotics).

This type of person would NOT have a diagnoses, and not know if they were suffering from tired feet - or something much more serious (that could not be helped by something off the counter). Would your staff be trained to recognize anything signs or symptoms of any of the conditions you listed (that contraindicate buying from your store)?

And - if I have this right, you're saying that if I were to walk into one of your stores, a salesrep would ask me if I was under the care of a doctor (although currently I'm really not)...and if I mentioned things like PF, TTS etc - they would indicate I should not be purchasing their products?

Re: goodfeet

BG.CPed on 1/23/03 at 18:19 (106521)

Dave, sorry to hear that, but it goes to show why there is no short supply of negative comments about goodfeet stores. If they sold shoes and pre made inserts for about $30 I would be fine. I see too many, mostly elderly ladies get hosed for a shoe and insert for about $400. Some of the stores may be decent but the bad ones seem more the norm.

We have a clown that goes to the builders show and state fair that sells Alzners for about $215 pair. An Ortotist I know was listening to his snake oil pitch and heard him tell a lady that was booked for surg in a week by a friend of mine that' you dont need surgery, thats a scam, buy these and you wont need it' My friend pulled her aside and she didnt get them. This was a lady that had total collapsed rigid flat foot w blown out post tib tendon and super tight heel cords meaning they would have felt like golf balls under her foot

The Chiropractor that posted here seems like a good guy with good intentions. I would ask him if he would support a kiosk in the mall that had people stand with each foot on a different house scale. If they showed a difference in wt of - + 3 lbs the 'customer service rep' could suggest an imbalance and put them on an inversion table for a 10 minute 'session' to realign their spine. The fee could be about $50 and a tune up could be $30 for each 10 minute stretch
Again I am not being a wise arse just throwing out a retorical question

My feeling on the goodfeet stores is that they are charging way too much for a pre made device.

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/21/03 at 20:21 (106207)

Thanks Jeff!

I don't know if I have every seen a goodfeet store (I live in Canada).

Do you have a sign up in the store that explains all of the conditions that signify that a person should NOT purchase something from your store?

Re: goodfeet

Richard, C.Ped on 1/22/03 at 08:59 (106272)

I like your post Jeff. You can not speak for the store in my area, just like I can not speak for other C.Peds who may practice in a shady way. There is always those out there that will give your business a bad name. I do however, think that $250 is still way to steep for an off the shelf orthosis. You would be very suprised how many people are getting ripped off with fly-by-night orthotic people. Especially the elderly diabetic community.

I will say that if someone does not have insurance or if their insurance does not cover orthotics...I always give discounts. I basically do not have a set price. I go by what the insurance allows or provide my own discounts. I never ever charge someone $250-$400 out of their pocket. I would not be able to pay that myself. When I do give discounts, I let my patients split up the payment to make it easier on them.

I treat my customers the way I wish to be treated. A little naive? Maybe. I guess that is why I get so angry when somone is not willing to help me out financially. I guess I do not understand why others do not do this, but not all businesses are the same.

Richard

Re: goodfeet

Jeff A. on 1/22/03 at 11:43 (106301)

Wendyn, there are stores in Canada, go to the website http://www.goodfeet.com and search locations.

Isn't there medical coverage through the government in Canada? Does it cover orthotics? In a previous post you mentioned your diagnosis. Who diagnosed you and did they recomend orthotics? It sounds like a pretty thorough diagnosis. You could see that doctor again or get another opinion, RSD is a serious condition. It sounds like you need custom orthotics or at least some guidance, rigid vs. semi-rigid etc.
Also, maybe richard C.Ped can post some criteria for finding a good C.Ped, he sounds like a knowledgible professional.

Jeff

Re: goodfeet

Ed Davis, DPM on 1/22/03 at 15:27 (106345)

Perhaps there are differences in which the owners conduct there business.
I have to wonder about the warranty. Prefab orthotics just do not work for a lot of patients. Patients in my area who have no success with the devices and who, in my opinion, have basically been mis-fit cannot get there money back -- they are out several hundred dollars. They are allowed to exchange for shoes though.

There is a lot more to orhtotics than just providing a device that seems to fit the foot. One must have an understanding of foot function and what the desired effect of the device is to be. How can that be done by a salesperson?
Ed

Re: goodfeet

D.Thomas on 1/22/03 at 16:34 (106362)

Excellent information Jeff.

I have had a visit to the 'goodfeet store' by my house and they are not at all operated how you put it here. I was just testing them out by telling them my problems I was having and showed them my existing orthotics. I couldn't believe this, but the salesman actually told me his orthotics were better than my prescription made orthotics. I played dumb and asked him why, and I have to say everything out of his month was complete BS. I just left the store and didn't say anything. Of course, they were also the most expensive orthotics they sold.

I have to say after looking at the orthotics and what was explained to me about them, I do not see what the difference between your most expensive orthotics and 'Powerstep Orthotics' for $30. But, that is my opinion.

Re: goodfeet

D.Thomas on 1/22/03 at 16:52 (106364)

I will also admit that I have been to Podiatrists that sold me orthotics that are now ice scrapers for my car.

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/22/03 at 19:24 (106388)

Thanks Jeff -

Orthotics are not covered by our provincial health care, but some people have additional Blue Cross coverage that does pay for a portion (myself included).

I have had several pairs of orthotics - some good and some bad. I am very happy with the pair I have right now.

My questions were of a general nature about the good feet stores - not because I thought that it was practical or reasonable for me to expect to go there. In my case, an over the counter orthotic would not be the best thing.

My various conditions have been diagnosed or confirmed by a sports medicine doctor, and an a couple podiatrists. Not all the conditions ocurred or were diagnosed at the same time.

Yes - they all recommended orthotics for me.

RSD is a serious (and painful!) condition - but thankfully mine seems to be mostly in a state of remission.

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/22/03 at 19:26 (106389)

ps - Jeff - missed the answer to the question, do you have a sign up in your store with all of the information you posted here (about who should be seeing their doctor instead?)

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/22/03 at 19:28 (106390)

Sorry - typing too fast for my brain - not that it matters much, but the RSD diagnosis was actually made by a foot and ankle orthepedic surgeon.

Re: goodfeet

Jeff A. on 1/22/03 at 23:23 (106411)

Wendyn,
It would be a very big sign. We post a warning about diabetes and cover the others with the question are you currently under a doctors care for any conditions?
Jeff

Re: goodfeet

wendyn on 1/23/03 at 08:49 (106437)

Jeff - bear with me a little longer (I can really be a pain in the a^& sometimes when I'm tryingt understand something- it's not personal).......

Part of my scattered train of thinking is, what would happen if someone is suffering from some big foot pain, and goes to your store looking for relief RATHER than seeing a doctor first?

I would have to suspect that this is your target market, since most doctors are not going to send patients to your store (they will write them a prescription for custom orthotics).

This type of person would NOT have a diagnoses, and not know if they were suffering from tired feet - or something much more serious (that could not be helped by something off the counter). Would your staff be trained to recognize anything signs or symptoms of any of the conditions you listed (that contraindicate buying from your store)?

And - if I have this right, you're saying that if I were to walk into one of your stores, a salesrep would ask me if I was under the care of a doctor (although currently I'm really not)...and if I mentioned things like PF, TTS etc - they would indicate I should not be purchasing their products?

Re: goodfeet

BG.CPed on 1/23/03 at 18:19 (106521)

Dave, sorry to hear that, but it goes to show why there is no short supply of negative comments about goodfeet stores. If they sold shoes and pre made inserts for about $30 I would be fine. I see too many, mostly elderly ladies get hosed for a shoe and insert for about $400. Some of the stores may be decent but the bad ones seem more the norm.

We have a clown that goes to the builders show and state fair that sells Alzners for about $215 pair. An Ortotist I know was listening to his snake oil pitch and heard him tell a lady that was booked for surg in a week by a friend of mine that' you dont need surgery, thats a scam, buy these and you wont need it' My friend pulled her aside and she didnt get them. This was a lady that had total collapsed rigid flat foot w blown out post tib tendon and super tight heel cords meaning they would have felt like golf balls under her foot

The Chiropractor that posted here seems like a good guy with good intentions. I would ask him if he would support a kiosk in the mall that had people stand with each foot on a different house scale. If they showed a difference in wt of - + 3 lbs the 'customer service rep' could suggest an imbalance and put them on an inversion table for a 10 minute 'session' to realign their spine. The fee could be about $50 and a tune up could be $30 for each 10 minute stretch
Again I am not being a wise arse just throwing out a retorical question

My feeling on the goodfeet stores is that they are charging way too much for a pre made device.

Re: goodfeet

PMini on 2/06/08 at 11:59 (242849)

I have nothing but good things to say about Good Feet. It seems to me that if people would just listen and follow the instructions they are given at the time of purchase as to how to get used to their arch supports there wouldn't be these complaints. I was given instructions and followed them to the letter. My feet adjusted well and I haven't had foot pain since. I think for the most part people are lazy and since we live in the NOW generation they just can't wait for relief. Patience and not only a virtue it also comes with great pleasure.

Re: goodfeet

PMini on 2/06/08 at 12:02 (242850)

As a quick follow up. I've seen some pretty good information about Good Feet and foot related issue at this site; http://feet-hurt.com/
hope it helps anyone thinking about arch supports and Good Feet.