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To Julie

Posted by Pauline on 1/25/03 at 14:51 (106760)

Julie,
I noticed in one of your posts you use incense and scented candles in your classes. Have you ever had anyone not take your class because of allergy reactions to scents?

The reason I ask and maybe no one has ever approached you about it is because I am very highly allergic to perfumes, incense, scented candles etc. I can't even go into our local Hallmark stores to purchase cards.

I'm like the kid in school that can't have peanuts in the room. We've had to walk out of theatres, churches, restaurants you name it. I wonder if anyone else here has perfume allergies. I love candles but they can't have any scents.

I notice some doctor offices now are posting signs for people not to wear any perfume there, so I'm sure that it must be a problem for some other people.

I've always wondered why women think they must put on so much. I've always understood only the people who get close to your neck should be able to smell it not the entire room. Some would knock you over with the amount of perfume they wear.

Does perfume or candles scents etc choke up anyone else?

Re: To Julie

Carole C in NOLA on 1/25/03 at 15:37 (106764)

Absolutely, Pauline. Amen. I couldn't agree with you more!

I smoked heavily for 15 years and because of it, my sense of smell is very dulled. Even so, I find that MOST, not just some, of the scents that people use are objectionable and make it difficult for me to breathe, see, or otherwise function normally other than to race for the door. I'm not allergic to them. I think the problem is just that 'subtle' and 'classy' have become four letter words in the past decade and some people equate subtle, classy people who do things in subtle, classy ways, to people who lack self-confidence.

Personally, I think that people who use enough perfume to knock you over may subconsciously have just exactly that in mind. They feel hostile, combative, and lack the self-confidence to deal with people up close. (grin)

I have never worn a scent until this year, but when I had PF I learned to like Night-Blooming Jasmine lotion for my feet, from Bath and Body Works. I wear their Night Blooming Jasmine spray to work. I just spray three times, and I can't smell it after a few minutes. However, my guess is that to others, it's as strong as I'd like it to be. I prefer the subtle, classy approach.... :)

Carole C

Re: To Julie

Carole C in NOLA on 1/25/03 at 15:38 (106765)

I forgot to add that I'm sure that Julie's scents are done in a subtle, classy way too. :)

Carole C

Re: Incense

Julie on 1/25/03 at 15:58 (106766)

I don't know about subtle and classy, Carole, but thanks for the thought.

Incense is used as an aid to concentration and meditation, to heighten the sense of smell, and encourage awareness of the breath. So there is a purpose to it: it's not 'for the sake of it'. I explain this, and let people know that it's ok not to like it and to tell me if they're adversely affected.

I don't think anyone has ever fled the class because of it, though one or two people over the years have changed their position in the room to be further away from it. The incense I use is fairly mild and of good quality, and the room is large enough so that it can be got away from. I would stop using it if anyone was distressed by it (for example, if either of you came to my class I would forego it). Most students like it, a few are indifferent.

I use ordinary long-burning church candles, not scented ones.

Re: Pauline

Kathy G on 1/25/03 at 18:17 (106780)

Pauline,

I have a very acute sense of smell. Sometimes it's drives me crazy but I figure that since smell accounts for half our taste, then maybe I benefit when I eat food I like! One time we had a tiny gas leak in our cellar and it took about six visits before the gas company found it. When they did, they told me they wanted to hire me to be their official sniffer!

So, yes, strong candles are a big problem for me, as are some people's not necessarily badly scented but strong perfumes and aftershaves. And I love the scent of lilacs but can't bring them into the house because they give me such a bad headache. I love candles but stick to vanilla or the unscented. My husband, who doesn't seem to be able to smell much of anything, gets all stuffed up and sneezes his head off if we go into a shop that carries candles. I used to think he was faking it so he'd get out of going shopping but realized that he couldn't be that good an actor.

I do love the look of burning candles, though, especially in the winter. Both of my sisters like candles do, as did my mother. My mother used to burn so many candles on Christmas Eve that we barely needed lights - or heat! She also burned incense, Julie, but after trying three types, she had to stop because it gave me such a headache.

Re: Smelly

wendyn on 1/25/03 at 18:44 (106784)

Kathy - nice to see I'm not the only one bothered by smells. I stick to mostly vanilla candles too.

Hubby came home with one of those spray air freshners for the bathroom. He sprayed it once, and within minutes I had a migraine and had to go to bed. I've never had anything like that happen before - but I have heard of perfume causing migraines in some people.

Re: Incense

Tammie on 1/25/03 at 18:45 (106785)

For Years I would never have candles in my home not because of scent , but afraid of fire. My hubby has a fish aquarium which we find relaxing watching our fish. I had recieved a small pot that you put a small candle in it and it is electric and it smells ao very nice. I loved it so much I decided to look into them and have since purchased a few.

I have observed that my hubby says that some are to much and he did not care for as he felt headacky. He does not care for sweet smells like vanilla or sugar cookies or what ever food type candles. It sure is weird to go into those candle shops and see the many different smells.

I enjoy scent it is the one thing I really like, be it fresh hay, clean laundry, apples, oh so very many I cant begin to list. they make me feel so lucky to be able to smell them and it is like relaxing.

Recently I had my eyes checked and learned I need bi focuals oh boy I did not even know my vision is that bad, the man said how do you drive do you understand how bad your vision is? I could laugh and say nope and I havent drove since my last surgery which is about 6 m onths or more.

So I will be very thankful to get my vision straightened out. Tho he says he needs to keep check on the pressure as it is on the high side. Not that i really understood that I tryed I thought I did till I got home , but I see him when I pick up my glasses and he will check it again. Do any of you understand that? My vision is a real gift also , I cant imagine not having it .

Re: Pauline

wendyn on 1/25/03 at 18:47 (106786)

Hi Pauline - I responded to Kathy's posts (because I read backwards) - but it looks like I was talking to you too!

Re: Incense

Carole C in NOLA on 1/25/03 at 18:55 (106789)

Tammie, he's just making sure that you don't have glaucoma. Glaucoma is easy to detect and treat, but it's also very serious if it's not treated. So, it's very important that you make sure he checks your pressure again when you pick up your glasses, ok? As long as he does check it, your vision should be fine. (hugs)

I sometimes get headaches from perfumes, but more than that I quickly become unable to breathe. So, I have to leave the area.

Carole C

Re: Incense

nancy s. on 1/25/03 at 20:18 (106795)

i'm amazed at this number of people who can't take scents! i wear no perfume because i don't want to attract bees (or human or other rats, for that matter), but i love scented candles and incense. phil can't take fake, overly sweet smelling stuff, but he burns incense fairly often, and i love it. apparently it helps him think (or not think, whichever he's trying to do at a given moment!).
nancy
.

Re: Incense

Carole C in NOLA on 1/25/03 at 20:43 (106798)

I know that I didn't have this problem with scents, until a few decades back when it seemed like people who happened to be around me started wearing much stronger scents. I think I got sensitized, maybe?

It's really weird. Some scents are fine with me, and some make it very hard to impossible to get a breath. I am fine with incense, too, and with my night blooming jasmine scent.

Carole C

Re: Incense

Nancy N on 1/25/03 at 22:09 (106805)

I have a varied history with scent. It really depends for me--my nose is quite sensitive, and while I like perfume (depending on the scent), I generally can't wear it because something in it irritates my nose and makes me sneeze. I adore scented candles, though, as long as they're the good ones, which aren't so overdosed with scent that you can't stand to be in the same room with them. I'm especially fond of the ones in jars, since I can just close the jar if I'm tired of smelling the scent. Yankee candles and Illuminations seem to be the best. But I don't like heavy floral scents. I went shopping with a friend a few months ago, and the scents I liked were too much for him, and vice versa. I love citrusy, fruity scents, but he couldn't deal with the pink grapefruit that I loved, and I took one whiff of the wisteria he picked and had to run across the room from it.

I've sung in choirs for a long time, and was always instructed--even in elementary school--that cologne was a strict no-no because you're so close to other people when you stand in performance. In college, there was a girl in the choir who was asthmatic and violently allergic to cologne. She didn't have the best manner of explaining this to the rest of us, and I know some people were so insulted by that manner that they were tempted to go overboard. And I really hate it when people do--it always seems to be guys, but maybe that's just my dumb luck. I work with another teacher who is wonderful except for his affection for cologne. If I teach in his classroom, I'm likely to walk out smelling of his cologne. I couldn't figure out how it could be so strong until a few months ago when I saw him re-applying it before going to get lunch! I kid you not, this guy is sometimes so bathed in the stuff that you can cross a sidewalk outside and know he was there because the scent is still hanging in the air.

I've discovered Origins 'lotion souffles' this year, which have wonderful scents but aren't overpowering. And they don't irritate my skin. So I can finally play around with some scent, without fearing that I'll go overboard, which is good for everytone.

(Incense is another matter altogether--especially if you're in the choir and trying to sing when someone walks by swinging a censer. Singing quickly becomes choking...)

Re: Incense

marie e on 1/26/03 at 06:52 (106817)

I love to look at fire . It's very soothing. I love scented candles but am a little sensitive to strong smells or musk types of fragerances.

When I teach the art of Kanji calligraphy or Sumi painting I bring candles into my classromm. This was how I was taught in Japan. There is something so much more atmospheric about Kanji when done by candle light. It is much more reflective. Even my athletes love creating Kanji characters by candle light.

Also I put orange peels on top of the blower in my classroom occasionally. It scents the room naturally.

marie

Re: Incense

nancy s. on 1/26/03 at 07:29 (106819)

marie, i'd love to take one of your kanji or sumi classes. they sound wonderful! you're in indiana, though, right? darn.

nancy
.

Re: Incense

marie e on 1/26/03 at 09:18 (106824)

Actually I am a terrible calligrapher....and certainly not a worthy sensei' of Kanji. But I love doing it....I usually try to find a foreign exchange student from Japan to assist. Most of them are very polite about my skills. I have been told the the symbol I did for laugh was 'just a giggle'.

Yes I am in frozen Indiana. I know you are in Maine...it is the one state in the 48 that I have not visited.

later marie

Re: To Tammie and all

Pauline on 1/26/03 at 11:43 (106842)

Tammie,
I think most physicians ask patients to have their vision checked at least once a year, however, if they detect something they will ask you to return more often.

Definately pressures should be checked at each visit. As we age changes take place in our eyes that we are not always aware of and can only be seen by a physician looking into the back chamber of our eyes. A complete eye exam which includes dilation of each eye is definately necessary yearly.

Our eyes work very well together, one can actually compansate for the other and there is an overlapping of image somewhat. Because of this you can have things happen in one eye and not notice it because the other eye is still doing the work.

Recently I had a friend diagnosed with a hole in her macula. The only thing she noticed was her vision didn't seem as clear so she thought it was time for a new eye glass prescription. She hadn't been to the doctor in 3 years.

Needless to say she was very surprised to hear the diagnosis which meant a very serious surgery ( a vitrectomy) to try to close the hole over her macula. Her result from surgery was not the greatest because she had the hole for some time but it went unnoticed. She can no longer see clear in that eye. A healthy macula is what gives us clear vision and it's about the size of the head of a pin.

One good tip I can share with the aging crowd on this web site or anyone for that matter is each and every day cover each eye individually with your hand and check the vision in the other making a complete square design. Go from corner to corner forming a square and make sure nothing has changed in that eye.

If you check on a regular basis you'll notice any changes and can get to your Opthomologist quickly. As in my friends case an earlier detection could have saved her some eye sight. Currently they are watching her other eye as it seems to be progressing toward a hole in the macula. Her doctor told her if caught very early she has a much better chance of repair in order to retain her vision clairity.

Our eyes are very important, never take them for granted, check them yourself daily and see your eye specialist at least yearly. Remember too some eye conditions can be hereditary, therefore your doctor needs to know about your family members who may have had eye problems.

Please remember to take good care of those peepers. There are eye conditions out there that most of us are not even aware exist and very frightening to read about.

Re: To Tammie and all

Julie on 1/26/03 at 12:34 (106843)

Pauline, thank you for that useful post and for the test. I'm at the age where I need and get an ophthalmologist's attention once a year, but I will also now do the self-test occasionally. A friend in the States is nearly blind now due to macular degeneration, and my husband has glaucoma, for which he is being treated, so we're well aware of the importance of regular checkups. People take their eyes (as they do their feet) for granted, but nothing should be taken for granted.

Re: macular degeneration

Carole C in NOLA on 1/26/03 at 12:44 (106845)

My apologies in advance if this post is tasteless, but I can't help but giggle when I remember the following visit to the opthalmologist:

A couple of years my opthalmologist (age 35 or so) told me I have macular degeneration. I'm only 54, and my grandfather was totally blind for most of his life due to retinal detachment, so I know what blindness entails. I was horrified. 'Oh no!', I said.

The youthful opthalmologist hastened to calm me down, saying, 'Oh don't worry. You have macular degeneration, but only the average amount for someone your age.'

I could have strangled him!!! lol

Carole C

Re: macular degeneration

john h on 1/26/03 at 15:11 (106873)

Carole: I would get some clarificaton on this issue. Macular degeration as a disease is not something we all get with age. You either have it or you do not. It might take decades to have a major effect. If the doc is saying your eyes like your bones are denterating that is something else but as a Doctor he sure used a poor choice of words if that is what he meant.Thre are two kinds of Macular Degenertion the wet and the dry. The wet is worse than the dry and both are very easy to diagnose as they look directly into your eyeball.

Re: To Tammie and all

john h on 1/26/03 at 15:16 (106874)

I did not see Paulines post Julie but people diagnosed with Macular Degeneration normally keep a little Grid posted on the frig or somewhere they can look at it daily to make sure all the lines are not running together. One lady I know who is about 80 had 4 laser surgeries for MD which helped at the time but now she is at the point she cannot drive and vision is very limited. My wife has had it for 10 or more years and it has not effected her very much as she has the dry type. She just had a checkup this past month and it has not progressed since last year.

Re: Incense

john h on 1/26/03 at 15:18 (106875)

Can you even begin to imagine what scent is like for a dog or cat who can recognize hundred of scents that are eve days or weeks old and even at great distances.

Re: Incense

john h on 1/26/03 at 15:20 (106876)

funny the scent thing came up today because I was just putting some scented oil (gardenia or apple) on some porpori (how on earth do you spell that?) around the house.

Re: macular degeneration

Carole C in NOLA on 1/26/03 at 15:48 (106883)

I don't know, John. Maybe you're right. He said that we all get it as we age and that the idea is for it to progress so slowly that we die before it becomes a problem. He says that like any part of the body, the macula degenerates with age but that for most people this is not a problem. In any case, I'm probably not going back to him. I just didn't feel sure about him at all.

He scared me silly by saying that, until he explained himself, because I know that macular degeneration is not curable. I also knew all about the wet and dry and all that before I went to him, but it didn't make it seem any better when he told me that everyone has some as they get older.

He wrote it down on my record and everything. But, he decided that the vision problems that I was having at the time were due to a large stye (chalazion) about the size of a marble which I had on my eye, not due to macular degeneration. He was right about that. During the exam, he did all sorts of looking directly into my eyeball, with sophisticated test equipment that must have cost a fortune.

Carole C

Re: To John

BrianG on 1/26/03 at 15:50 (106884)

I'd log off the computer when you leave the house from now on. Today someone used your account to post a bunch of non-manly stuff that I'm pretty sure you would never do, :*)

B

Re: To John

Carole C in NOLA on 1/26/03 at 15:52 (106885)

Come to think of it, since when is potpourri with gardenia scent more masculine than Birkenstocks with Thorlos? :)

Carole C

Re: To Julie

Suzanne D on 1/26/03 at 16:43 (106898)

I love vanilla scents as well as 'sugar cookie' and 'gingerbread'. (Says something about how I like cookies, I guess!) I find that I tolerate them quite well, but anything too flowery and overpowering or fruity can very quickly bring on a migraine headache. So I sympathize with anyone who has trouble with scents. Some aftershaves are really hard for me to tolerate.
My daddy always wore 'Old Spice', and that is one that I like and that doesn't bother me.

Suzanne :-)

Re: macular degeneration

pala on 1/26/03 at 17:48 (106903)

i read someting somewhere about macular degeneration and a vitamin slowing it down. can't remember details. internet search might come up with something.

Re: Amsler Grid

BrianG on 1/26/03 at 23:11 (106929)

Hi Pauline,

My dad had Macular Degeneration pretty bad before he passed away. Is this something that I'm now predisposed to get? I try to see the eye doc every year, but it doesn't always work out. I should put up a chart like JohnH was talking about, I've seen them at the doctor's office. I bet I can find one on the Net!

Thanks
Brian

PS: I just checked the Net, the chart is called an 'Amsler Grid'

Re: macular degeneration

Carole C in NOLA on 1/27/03 at 06:05 (106931)

John, I did a search on 'macular degeneration and aging' and here's what I found at the first link I checked out:

'Many older people develop macular degeneration as part of the body's aging process. The two most common types of age-related macular degeneration are 'dry' and 'wet'. Most common is 'dry' macular degeneration. It is caused by aging and thinning of the tissues of the macula. Vision loss is usually gradual. 'Wet' macular degeneration accounts for about 10% of all cases. It results when abnormal blood vessels form at the back of the eye. These new blood vessels leak fluid or blood and blur central vision. Vision loss may be rapid and severe.'

Carole C

Re: macular degeneration

Kathy G on 1/27/03 at 08:49 (106945)

I have had eight surgeries for strabismus, the technical name for cross eyes. I use only one eye at a time and have never had binocular vision. My first surgery was at three years of age and the last at thirty-three. My son inherited the disorder and has had five surgeries. I always brought my children to the eye doctor for check-ups every two years and I am just amazed at the number of people who don't think about their eyes and go for regular checks. Obviously, as someone said, we take our eyes for granted just the same way as we take our feet for granted!

My dad had Glaucoma and he had two laser surgeries to reduce the fluid buildup in his really bad eye. He used two types of drops and took a diuretic for it. His great fear was that he would lose his eyesight altogether and we were so happy that he never did.

So, yes, go to the eye doctor on a regular basis and definitely go back and have that recheck. Brian, I know that Glaucoma and Strabismus are famililial, but I don't know about Macular Degeneration but it would be worth looking into. Take care of those eyes, folks!!

Re: macular degeneration

john h on 1/27/03 at 09:57 (106961)

Yes Paula there are some vitimins or minerals that people use. I was with Mary when she asked the Omphamologist about them. He said there were no scientific studies but it would do no harm to take them. If you have the dry type Mac Dengeneration you still must be very wary because it can turn into the wet kind very rapidly and early treatment is a must.I know of one mineral/vitimin that is now included in many multi vitimins which is supposed to be good for the eyes and it is 'Luten'.

Re: To John

john h on 1/27/03 at 10:06 (106962)

Carole: When I was about 8 years old me and my buddy used my mothers silver tray and we we would place a group of nice gardenias on the tray and stand outside nice resturants and sell them to couples going in. We were living in florida so we had easy access to all the free gardenias we wanted. we alway sold all we had. two street urchins and all the WWII GI's with their girls how could we miss? Still love the smell of gardenias. I would often give them to my date at proms to wear. By the way do teenagers still bring flowers for their dates on prom nights? maybe this custom has gone with the wind?. I had two gardenia plants at my home here in Little Rock but lost them in a terrible cold ice storm a couple of years ago. We are in the iffy area to plant gardenias.

Re: To John

Carole C in NOLA on 1/27/03 at 11:11 (106979)

Boys gave girls corsages for the prom when my daughter was in high school (she's 24 now). It's gotten even more expensive because at the homecoming games in Texas, high school boys bring high school girls these very elaborate mums with ribbons in the school colors that can cost $100 or more.

I love the smell of gardenias. Sorry to hear about your gardenia's being lost to the ice storm. Hmm! Maybe I could plant a gardenia plant later this spring. At least I'd know that it needs protection from any freezing weather, and our very few freezes here are probably not as long or as bad as that ice storm you had.

There are a lot of things I could plant here, once I clean up my back yard and spring arrives. One year soon I'd like to build a raised planter for some roses, in the back yard.

I've had foot problems too long. I almost spelled that 'plantar'! lol

Crepe myrtles grow here and are lovely. One day I would like to work on my back yard and plant a few more things, and maybe put in some stepping stones, a concrete birdbath, bird feeder, and a little bench, and maybe even a trellis, all of which would add to the story-book quality that it already has for me.

Let's see: a raised planter for roses, stepping stones, birdbath, bird feeder, bench, and trellis, in my small back yard. That in addition to the tree swing, waist high concrete Indian brave, and several concrete frogs that are already out there, and who knows what else that I haven't yet found.

I hope I have room left for the banana trees! LOLOL

Carole C

Re: To John re: gardenias

Kathy G on 1/27/03 at 13:47 (107013)

What a shame your plant froze, John. I just love gardenias! My mother used to have gardenia plants abut here we grow them indoors. She had several over the years, but the most beautiful one was killed when her friend was taking care of it while we were on vacation. It had about 10 blossoms on it when we left and had only about 10 leaves on it when we returned! Her friend obviously forgot to water it! I've never given it a try as it is a very tempermental house plant.

Yes, when my daughter went to her last prom in 1999, her date brought her a corsage. Well, actually it was a wrist thingie. She requested roses so that's what she got. I don't know if gardenias are as popular as they used to be. It seems like all her friends had roses. Could have been the price, though. As Carole said, these proms are a very expensive proposition these days.

Re: Thank you,

Tammie on 1/27/03 at 18:36 (107055)

You see,I to would never thougth about my vision,except I had noticed my vision a bit blurry and headachey.My hubby had his appt. and he just made one for me also!

I had no idea how complicated the exam seemed, I mean really it took quite a bit to exam and check my eyes with some puff machine,and those cards and dimmed the lights and pointed to corners and the drops and like I said it was a nice through xam and I am glad I did it.

Once again I should be taking care of my whole body! My mom had both the cateracs and Glacoma? You know my spelling is bad I am sorryI try. So Now I have found out how precious our eyes are and I know I will be taking good care of mine as I love to read and I think site is so verry precious! Maybe this will inspire others to check theres also! Thank you all for the thoughts.I am a bit anxious to wear glasses as I have not done so. I hear it takes a bit to get used to the Bifocual They suggested no line so that is what i did. But we shall see. They told me if I dont like them without line they can make them with it for no extra charge. So I thought that was nice to.

Re: Thank you,

Carole C in NOLA on 1/27/03 at 19:56 (107070)

Tammie, I had heard a lot about how hard it is to get used to bifocals (especially in climbing stairs), before I got my first pair. I was really surprised! It was not hard at all for me. In fact, they were great because I could see better.

So, you may be surprised too! :)

Carole C

Re: To John re: gardenias

john h on 1/28/03 at 08:40 (107116)

About two years ago I planted a small variety of Gardenia plant and it blooms at least three times a year. The flowers are very small compared to the conventional Gardenia but they have the same wonderful smell.

Re: To John

john h on 1/28/03 at 08:45 (107118)

Carole: I have lots of very large crepe myrtles, azeleas and my back yard is completely surrounded by 20' red tops. this reminds me it is almost Feb and time to cut back the crepe myrtles.

Re: To John

JudyS on 1/28/03 at 11:59 (107136)

Thanks for the reminder, John, I have two crepe myrtles yelling at me to get them trimmed back :)

Re: To John re: gardenias

Carole C in NOLA on 1/28/03 at 12:37 (107146)

I'll bet the small version would do well in a pot, too. Then it could be brought in during the cold. :)

I'd love to have that wonderful smell in my house.

Carole C

Re: To John

Carole C in NOLA on 1/28/03 at 12:40 (107147)

John, next week I will check my garden and probably find reasons to cut back other things.

Right now my entire body is one gigantic ache and I can hardly move. That's probably from cutting down those banana trees and disposing of them. I don't care if I never cut back another thing in my life. LOL

Carole C

Re: To John

Nancy N on 1/28/03 at 21:31 (107206)

Judy, what sort of voice to crepe myrtles have? :)

Re: To John

nancy s. on 1/28/03 at 22:42 (107219)

are crepe myrtles something to eat?

or maybe that would be myrtle crepes.

help.

Re: To John

JudyS on 1/29/03 at 10:19 (107238)

Dunno, Nancy - but it sure reminds me of my mom yelling at me to clean my room when I was 14! It's just always there.

Re: To John

john h on 1/29/03 at 12:55 (107245)

Nancy: I have not had a bite of this particualr plant but I have indulged in snake, various bugs, and plants while in survival school.Once while returning from a three day stay in the desert in a survial school our bus stopped at a roadside place where I purchased a grape snow cone. Of course my tounge and lips were a bright purple.Our wives were there to meet us as our team returned and as my wife started to give me a kiss she asked about my mouth and I told her it was from the snake we had to eat. No kiss- No nothing.

Re: To John re: gardenias

john h on 1/29/03 at 12:58 (107246)

You are probably right about bringing them in Carole but they need light and seem a lot more hearty than the large variety. With your warmth and humidity you should be in garden heaven.

Re: To John

nancy s. on 1/29/03 at 17:48 (107273)

you're lucky your wife was already married to you, john. if she'd been just a girlfriend, you might still be a bachelor now.
nancy
.

Re: To Julie

Carole C in NOLA on 1/25/03 at 15:37 (106764)

Absolutely, Pauline. Amen. I couldn't agree with you more!

I smoked heavily for 15 years and because of it, my sense of smell is very dulled. Even so, I find that MOST, not just some, of the scents that people use are objectionable and make it difficult for me to breathe, see, or otherwise function normally other than to race for the door. I'm not allergic to them. I think the problem is just that 'subtle' and 'classy' have become four letter words in the past decade and some people equate subtle, classy people who do things in subtle, classy ways, to people who lack self-confidence.

Personally, I think that people who use enough perfume to knock you over may subconsciously have just exactly that in mind. They feel hostile, combative, and lack the self-confidence to deal with people up close. (grin)

I have never worn a scent until this year, but when I had PF I learned to like Night-Blooming Jasmine lotion for my feet, from Bath and Body Works. I wear their Night Blooming Jasmine spray to work. I just spray three times, and I can't smell it after a few minutes. However, my guess is that to others, it's as strong as I'd like it to be. I prefer the subtle, classy approach.... :)

Carole C

Re: To Julie

Carole C in NOLA on 1/25/03 at 15:38 (106765)

I forgot to add that I'm sure that Julie's scents are done in a subtle, classy way too. :)

Carole C

Re: Incense

Julie on 1/25/03 at 15:58 (106766)

I don't know about subtle and classy, Carole, but thanks for the thought.

Incense is used as an aid to concentration and meditation, to heighten the sense of smell, and encourage awareness of the breath. So there is a purpose to it: it's not 'for the sake of it'. I explain this, and let people know that it's ok not to like it and to tell me if they're adversely affected.

I don't think anyone has ever fled the class because of it, though one or two people over the years have changed their position in the room to be further away from it. The incense I use is fairly mild and of good quality, and the room is large enough so that it can be got away from. I would stop using it if anyone was distressed by it (for example, if either of you came to my class I would forego it). Most students like it, a few are indifferent.

I use ordinary long-burning church candles, not scented ones.

Re: Pauline

Kathy G on 1/25/03 at 18:17 (106780)

Pauline,

I have a very acute sense of smell. Sometimes it's drives me crazy but I figure that since smell accounts for half our taste, then maybe I benefit when I eat food I like! One time we had a tiny gas leak in our cellar and it took about six visits before the gas company found it. When they did, they told me they wanted to hire me to be their official sniffer!

So, yes, strong candles are a big problem for me, as are some people's not necessarily badly scented but strong perfumes and aftershaves. And I love the scent of lilacs but can't bring them into the house because they give me such a bad headache. I love candles but stick to vanilla or the unscented. My husband, who doesn't seem to be able to smell much of anything, gets all stuffed up and sneezes his head off if we go into a shop that carries candles. I used to think he was faking it so he'd get out of going shopping but realized that he couldn't be that good an actor.

I do love the look of burning candles, though, especially in the winter. Both of my sisters like candles do, as did my mother. My mother used to burn so many candles on Christmas Eve that we barely needed lights - or heat! She also burned incense, Julie, but after trying three types, she had to stop because it gave me such a headache.

Re: Smelly

wendyn on 1/25/03 at 18:44 (106784)

Kathy - nice to see I'm not the only one bothered by smells. I stick to mostly vanilla candles too.

Hubby came home with one of those spray air freshners for the bathroom. He sprayed it once, and within minutes I had a migraine and had to go to bed. I've never had anything like that happen before - but I have heard of perfume causing migraines in some people.

Re: Incense

Tammie on 1/25/03 at 18:45 (106785)

For Years I would never have candles in my home not because of scent , but afraid of fire. My hubby has a fish aquarium which we find relaxing watching our fish. I had recieved a small pot that you put a small candle in it and it is electric and it smells ao very nice. I loved it so much I decided to look into them and have since purchased a few.

I have observed that my hubby says that some are to much and he did not care for as he felt headacky. He does not care for sweet smells like vanilla or sugar cookies or what ever food type candles. It sure is weird to go into those candle shops and see the many different smells.

I enjoy scent it is the one thing I really like, be it fresh hay, clean laundry, apples, oh so very many I cant begin to list. they make me feel so lucky to be able to smell them and it is like relaxing.

Recently I had my eyes checked and learned I need bi focuals oh boy I did not even know my vision is that bad, the man said how do you drive do you understand how bad your vision is? I could laugh and say nope and I havent drove since my last surgery which is about 6 m onths or more.

So I will be very thankful to get my vision straightened out. Tho he says he needs to keep check on the pressure as it is on the high side. Not that i really understood that I tryed I thought I did till I got home , but I see him when I pick up my glasses and he will check it again. Do any of you understand that? My vision is a real gift also , I cant imagine not having it .

Re: Pauline

wendyn on 1/25/03 at 18:47 (106786)

Hi Pauline - I responded to Kathy's posts (because I read backwards) - but it looks like I was talking to you too!

Re: Incense

Carole C in NOLA on 1/25/03 at 18:55 (106789)

Tammie, he's just making sure that you don't have glaucoma. Glaucoma is easy to detect and treat, but it's also very serious if it's not treated. So, it's very important that you make sure he checks your pressure again when you pick up your glasses, ok? As long as he does check it, your vision should be fine. (hugs)

I sometimes get headaches from perfumes, but more than that I quickly become unable to breathe. So, I have to leave the area.

Carole C

Re: Incense

nancy s. on 1/25/03 at 20:18 (106795)

i'm amazed at this number of people who can't take scents! i wear no perfume because i don't want to attract bees (or human or other rats, for that matter), but i love scented candles and incense. phil can't take fake, overly sweet smelling stuff, but he burns incense fairly often, and i love it. apparently it helps him think (or not think, whichever he's trying to do at a given moment!).
nancy
.

Re: Incense

Carole C in NOLA on 1/25/03 at 20:43 (106798)

I know that I didn't have this problem with scents, until a few decades back when it seemed like people who happened to be around me started wearing much stronger scents. I think I got sensitized, maybe?

It's really weird. Some scents are fine with me, and some make it very hard to impossible to get a breath. I am fine with incense, too, and with my night blooming jasmine scent.

Carole C

Re: Incense

Nancy N on 1/25/03 at 22:09 (106805)

I have a varied history with scent. It really depends for me--my nose is quite sensitive, and while I like perfume (depending on the scent), I generally can't wear it because something in it irritates my nose and makes me sneeze. I adore scented candles, though, as long as they're the good ones, which aren't so overdosed with scent that you can't stand to be in the same room with them. I'm especially fond of the ones in jars, since I can just close the jar if I'm tired of smelling the scent. Yankee candles and Illuminations seem to be the best. But I don't like heavy floral scents. I went shopping with a friend a few months ago, and the scents I liked were too much for him, and vice versa. I love citrusy, fruity scents, but he couldn't deal with the pink grapefruit that I loved, and I took one whiff of the wisteria he picked and had to run across the room from it.

I've sung in choirs for a long time, and was always instructed--even in elementary school--that cologne was a strict no-no because you're so close to other people when you stand in performance. In college, there was a girl in the choir who was asthmatic and violently allergic to cologne. She didn't have the best manner of explaining this to the rest of us, and I know some people were so insulted by that manner that they were tempted to go overboard. And I really hate it when people do--it always seems to be guys, but maybe that's just my dumb luck. I work with another teacher who is wonderful except for his affection for cologne. If I teach in his classroom, I'm likely to walk out smelling of his cologne. I couldn't figure out how it could be so strong until a few months ago when I saw him re-applying it before going to get lunch! I kid you not, this guy is sometimes so bathed in the stuff that you can cross a sidewalk outside and know he was there because the scent is still hanging in the air.

I've discovered Origins 'lotion souffles' this year, which have wonderful scents but aren't overpowering. And they don't irritate my skin. So I can finally play around with some scent, without fearing that I'll go overboard, which is good for everytone.

(Incense is another matter altogether--especially if you're in the choir and trying to sing when someone walks by swinging a censer. Singing quickly becomes choking...)

Re: Incense

marie e on 1/26/03 at 06:52 (106817)

I love to look at fire . It's very soothing. I love scented candles but am a little sensitive to strong smells or musk types of fragerances.

When I teach the art of Kanji calligraphy or Sumi painting I bring candles into my classromm. This was how I was taught in Japan. There is something so much more atmospheric about Kanji when done by candle light. It is much more reflective. Even my athletes love creating Kanji characters by candle light.

Also I put orange peels on top of the blower in my classroom occasionally. It scents the room naturally.

marie

Re: Incense

nancy s. on 1/26/03 at 07:29 (106819)

marie, i'd love to take one of your kanji or sumi classes. they sound wonderful! you're in indiana, though, right? darn.

nancy
.

Re: Incense

marie e on 1/26/03 at 09:18 (106824)

Actually I am a terrible calligrapher....and certainly not a worthy sensei' of Kanji. But I love doing it....I usually try to find a foreign exchange student from Japan to assist. Most of them are very polite about my skills. I have been told the the symbol I did for laugh was 'just a giggle'.

Yes I am in frozen Indiana. I know you are in Maine...it is the one state in the 48 that I have not visited.

later marie

Re: To Tammie and all

Pauline on 1/26/03 at 11:43 (106842)

Tammie,
I think most physicians ask patients to have their vision checked at least once a year, however, if they detect something they will ask you to return more often.

Definately pressures should be checked at each visit. As we age changes take place in our eyes that we are not always aware of and can only be seen by a physician looking into the back chamber of our eyes. A complete eye exam which includes dilation of each eye is definately necessary yearly.

Our eyes work very well together, one can actually compansate for the other and there is an overlapping of image somewhat. Because of this you can have things happen in one eye and not notice it because the other eye is still doing the work.

Recently I had a friend diagnosed with a hole in her macula. The only thing she noticed was her vision didn't seem as clear so she thought it was time for a new eye glass prescription. She hadn't been to the doctor in 3 years.

Needless to say she was very surprised to hear the diagnosis which meant a very serious surgery ( a vitrectomy) to try to close the hole over her macula. Her result from surgery was not the greatest because she had the hole for some time but it went unnoticed. She can no longer see clear in that eye. A healthy macula is what gives us clear vision and it's about the size of the head of a pin.

One good tip I can share with the aging crowd on this web site or anyone for that matter is each and every day cover each eye individually with your hand and check the vision in the other making a complete square design. Go from corner to corner forming a square and make sure nothing has changed in that eye.

If you check on a regular basis you'll notice any changes and can get to your Opthomologist quickly. As in my friends case an earlier detection could have saved her some eye sight. Currently they are watching her other eye as it seems to be progressing toward a hole in the macula. Her doctor told her if caught very early she has a much better chance of repair in order to retain her vision clairity.

Our eyes are very important, never take them for granted, check them yourself daily and see your eye specialist at least yearly. Remember too some eye conditions can be hereditary, therefore your doctor needs to know about your family members who may have had eye problems.

Please remember to take good care of those peepers. There are eye conditions out there that most of us are not even aware exist and very frightening to read about.

Re: To Tammie and all

Julie on 1/26/03 at 12:34 (106843)

Pauline, thank you for that useful post and for the test. I'm at the age where I need and get an ophthalmologist's attention once a year, but I will also now do the self-test occasionally. A friend in the States is nearly blind now due to macular degeneration, and my husband has glaucoma, for which he is being treated, so we're well aware of the importance of regular checkups. People take their eyes (as they do their feet) for granted, but nothing should be taken for granted.

Re: macular degeneration

Carole C in NOLA on 1/26/03 at 12:44 (106845)

My apologies in advance if this post is tasteless, but I can't help but giggle when I remember the following visit to the opthalmologist:

A couple of years my opthalmologist (age 35 or so) told me I have macular degeneration. I'm only 54, and my grandfather was totally blind for most of his life due to retinal detachment, so I know what blindness entails. I was horrified. 'Oh no!', I said.

The youthful opthalmologist hastened to calm me down, saying, 'Oh don't worry. You have macular degeneration, but only the average amount for someone your age.'

I could have strangled him!!! lol

Carole C

Re: macular degeneration

john h on 1/26/03 at 15:11 (106873)

Carole: I would get some clarificaton on this issue. Macular degeration as a disease is not something we all get with age. You either have it or you do not. It might take decades to have a major effect. If the doc is saying your eyes like your bones are denterating that is something else but as a Doctor he sure used a poor choice of words if that is what he meant.Thre are two kinds of Macular Degenertion the wet and the dry. The wet is worse than the dry and both are very easy to diagnose as they look directly into your eyeball.

Re: To Tammie and all

john h on 1/26/03 at 15:16 (106874)

I did not see Paulines post Julie but people diagnosed with Macular Degeneration normally keep a little Grid posted on the frig or somewhere they can look at it daily to make sure all the lines are not running together. One lady I know who is about 80 had 4 laser surgeries for MD which helped at the time but now she is at the point she cannot drive and vision is very limited. My wife has had it for 10 or more years and it has not effected her very much as she has the dry type. She just had a checkup this past month and it has not progressed since last year.

Re: Incense

john h on 1/26/03 at 15:18 (106875)

Can you even begin to imagine what scent is like for a dog or cat who can recognize hundred of scents that are eve days or weeks old and even at great distances.

Re: Incense

john h on 1/26/03 at 15:20 (106876)

funny the scent thing came up today because I was just putting some scented oil (gardenia or apple) on some porpori (how on earth do you spell that?) around the house.

Re: macular degeneration

Carole C in NOLA on 1/26/03 at 15:48 (106883)

I don't know, John. Maybe you're right. He said that we all get it as we age and that the idea is for it to progress so slowly that we die before it becomes a problem. He says that like any part of the body, the macula degenerates with age but that for most people this is not a problem. In any case, I'm probably not going back to him. I just didn't feel sure about him at all.

He scared me silly by saying that, until he explained himself, because I know that macular degeneration is not curable. I also knew all about the wet and dry and all that before I went to him, but it didn't make it seem any better when he told me that everyone has some as they get older.

He wrote it down on my record and everything. But, he decided that the vision problems that I was having at the time were due to a large stye (chalazion) about the size of a marble which I had on my eye, not due to macular degeneration. He was right about that. During the exam, he did all sorts of looking directly into my eyeball, with sophisticated test equipment that must have cost a fortune.

Carole C

Re: To John

BrianG on 1/26/03 at 15:50 (106884)

I'd log off the computer when you leave the house from now on. Today someone used your account to post a bunch of non-manly stuff that I'm pretty sure you would never do, :*)

B

Re: To John

Carole C in NOLA on 1/26/03 at 15:52 (106885)

Come to think of it, since when is potpourri with gardenia scent more masculine than Birkenstocks with Thorlos? :)

Carole C

Re: To Julie

Suzanne D on 1/26/03 at 16:43 (106898)

I love vanilla scents as well as 'sugar cookie' and 'gingerbread'. (Says something about how I like cookies, I guess!) I find that I tolerate them quite well, but anything too flowery and overpowering or fruity can very quickly bring on a migraine headache. So I sympathize with anyone who has trouble with scents. Some aftershaves are really hard for me to tolerate.
My daddy always wore 'Old Spice', and that is one that I like and that doesn't bother me.

Suzanne :-)

Re: macular degeneration

pala on 1/26/03 at 17:48 (106903)

i read someting somewhere about macular degeneration and a vitamin slowing it down. can't remember details. internet search might come up with something.

Re: Amsler Grid

BrianG on 1/26/03 at 23:11 (106929)

Hi Pauline,

My dad had Macular Degeneration pretty bad before he passed away. Is this something that I'm now predisposed to get? I try to see the eye doc every year, but it doesn't always work out. I should put up a chart like JohnH was talking about, I've seen them at the doctor's office. I bet I can find one on the Net!

Thanks
Brian

PS: I just checked the Net, the chart is called an 'Amsler Grid'

Re: macular degeneration

Carole C in NOLA on 1/27/03 at 06:05 (106931)

John, I did a search on 'macular degeneration and aging' and here's what I found at the first link I checked out:

'Many older people develop macular degeneration as part of the body's aging process. The two most common types of age-related macular degeneration are 'dry' and 'wet'. Most common is 'dry' macular degeneration. It is caused by aging and thinning of the tissues of the macula. Vision loss is usually gradual. 'Wet' macular degeneration accounts for about 10% of all cases. It results when abnormal blood vessels form at the back of the eye. These new blood vessels leak fluid or blood and blur central vision. Vision loss may be rapid and severe.'

Carole C

Re: macular degeneration

Kathy G on 1/27/03 at 08:49 (106945)

I have had eight surgeries for strabismus, the technical name for cross eyes. I use only one eye at a time and have never had binocular vision. My first surgery was at three years of age and the last at thirty-three. My son inherited the disorder and has had five surgeries. I always brought my children to the eye doctor for check-ups every two years and I am just amazed at the number of people who don't think about their eyes and go for regular checks. Obviously, as someone said, we take our eyes for granted just the same way as we take our feet for granted!

My dad had Glaucoma and he had two laser surgeries to reduce the fluid buildup in his really bad eye. He used two types of drops and took a diuretic for it. His great fear was that he would lose his eyesight altogether and we were so happy that he never did.

So, yes, go to the eye doctor on a regular basis and definitely go back and have that recheck. Brian, I know that Glaucoma and Strabismus are famililial, but I don't know about Macular Degeneration but it would be worth looking into. Take care of those eyes, folks!!

Re: macular degeneration

john h on 1/27/03 at 09:57 (106961)

Yes Paula there are some vitimins or minerals that people use. I was with Mary when she asked the Omphamologist about them. He said there were no scientific studies but it would do no harm to take them. If you have the dry type Mac Dengeneration you still must be very wary because it can turn into the wet kind very rapidly and early treatment is a must.I know of one mineral/vitimin that is now included in many multi vitimins which is supposed to be good for the eyes and it is 'Luten'.

Re: To John

john h on 1/27/03 at 10:06 (106962)

Carole: When I was about 8 years old me and my buddy used my mothers silver tray and we we would place a group of nice gardenias on the tray and stand outside nice resturants and sell them to couples going in. We were living in florida so we had easy access to all the free gardenias we wanted. we alway sold all we had. two street urchins and all the WWII GI's with their girls how could we miss? Still love the smell of gardenias. I would often give them to my date at proms to wear. By the way do teenagers still bring flowers for their dates on prom nights? maybe this custom has gone with the wind?. I had two gardenia plants at my home here in Little Rock but lost them in a terrible cold ice storm a couple of years ago. We are in the iffy area to plant gardenias.

Re: To John

Carole C in NOLA on 1/27/03 at 11:11 (106979)

Boys gave girls corsages for the prom when my daughter was in high school (she's 24 now). It's gotten even more expensive because at the homecoming games in Texas, high school boys bring high school girls these very elaborate mums with ribbons in the school colors that can cost $100 or more.

I love the smell of gardenias. Sorry to hear about your gardenia's being lost to the ice storm. Hmm! Maybe I could plant a gardenia plant later this spring. At least I'd know that it needs protection from any freezing weather, and our very few freezes here are probably not as long or as bad as that ice storm you had.

There are a lot of things I could plant here, once I clean up my back yard and spring arrives. One year soon I'd like to build a raised planter for some roses, in the back yard.

I've had foot problems too long. I almost spelled that 'plantar'! lol

Crepe myrtles grow here and are lovely. One day I would like to work on my back yard and plant a few more things, and maybe put in some stepping stones, a concrete birdbath, bird feeder, and a little bench, and maybe even a trellis, all of which would add to the story-book quality that it already has for me.

Let's see: a raised planter for roses, stepping stones, birdbath, bird feeder, bench, and trellis, in my small back yard. That in addition to the tree swing, waist high concrete Indian brave, and several concrete frogs that are already out there, and who knows what else that I haven't yet found.

I hope I have room left for the banana trees! LOLOL

Carole C

Re: To John re: gardenias

Kathy G on 1/27/03 at 13:47 (107013)

What a shame your plant froze, John. I just love gardenias! My mother used to have gardenia plants abut here we grow them indoors. She had several over the years, but the most beautiful one was killed when her friend was taking care of it while we were on vacation. It had about 10 blossoms on it when we left and had only about 10 leaves on it when we returned! Her friend obviously forgot to water it! I've never given it a try as it is a very tempermental house plant.

Yes, when my daughter went to her last prom in 1999, her date brought her a corsage. Well, actually it was a wrist thingie. She requested roses so that's what she got. I don't know if gardenias are as popular as they used to be. It seems like all her friends had roses. Could have been the price, though. As Carole said, these proms are a very expensive proposition these days.

Re: Thank you,

Tammie on 1/27/03 at 18:36 (107055)

You see,I to would never thougth about my vision,except I had noticed my vision a bit blurry and headachey.My hubby had his appt. and he just made one for me also!

I had no idea how complicated the exam seemed, I mean really it took quite a bit to exam and check my eyes with some puff machine,and those cards and dimmed the lights and pointed to corners and the drops and like I said it was a nice through xam and I am glad I did it.

Once again I should be taking care of my whole body! My mom had both the cateracs and Glacoma? You know my spelling is bad I am sorryI try. So Now I have found out how precious our eyes are and I know I will be taking good care of mine as I love to read and I think site is so verry precious! Maybe this will inspire others to check theres also! Thank you all for the thoughts.I am a bit anxious to wear glasses as I have not done so. I hear it takes a bit to get used to the Bifocual They suggested no line so that is what i did. But we shall see. They told me if I dont like them without line they can make them with it for no extra charge. So I thought that was nice to.

Re: Thank you,

Carole C in NOLA on 1/27/03 at 19:56 (107070)

Tammie, I had heard a lot about how hard it is to get used to bifocals (especially in climbing stairs), before I got my first pair. I was really surprised! It was not hard at all for me. In fact, they were great because I could see better.

So, you may be surprised too! :)

Carole C

Re: To John re: gardenias

john h on 1/28/03 at 08:40 (107116)

About two years ago I planted a small variety of Gardenia plant and it blooms at least three times a year. The flowers are very small compared to the conventional Gardenia but they have the same wonderful smell.

Re: To John

john h on 1/28/03 at 08:45 (107118)

Carole: I have lots of very large crepe myrtles, azeleas and my back yard is completely surrounded by 20' red tops. this reminds me it is almost Feb and time to cut back the crepe myrtles.

Re: To John

JudyS on 1/28/03 at 11:59 (107136)

Thanks for the reminder, John, I have two crepe myrtles yelling at me to get them trimmed back :)

Re: To John re: gardenias

Carole C in NOLA on 1/28/03 at 12:37 (107146)

I'll bet the small version would do well in a pot, too. Then it could be brought in during the cold. :)

I'd love to have that wonderful smell in my house.

Carole C

Re: To John

Carole C in NOLA on 1/28/03 at 12:40 (107147)

John, next week I will check my garden and probably find reasons to cut back other things.

Right now my entire body is one gigantic ache and I can hardly move. That's probably from cutting down those banana trees and disposing of them. I don't care if I never cut back another thing in my life. LOL

Carole C

Re: To John

Nancy N on 1/28/03 at 21:31 (107206)

Judy, what sort of voice to crepe myrtles have? :)

Re: To John

nancy s. on 1/28/03 at 22:42 (107219)

are crepe myrtles something to eat?

or maybe that would be myrtle crepes.

help.

Re: To John

JudyS on 1/29/03 at 10:19 (107238)

Dunno, Nancy - but it sure reminds me of my mom yelling at me to clean my room when I was 14! It's just always there.

Re: To John

john h on 1/29/03 at 12:55 (107245)

Nancy: I have not had a bite of this particualr plant but I have indulged in snake, various bugs, and plants while in survival school.Once while returning from a three day stay in the desert in a survial school our bus stopped at a roadside place where I purchased a grape snow cone. Of course my tounge and lips were a bright purple.Our wives were there to meet us as our team returned and as my wife started to give me a kiss she asked about my mouth and I told her it was from the snake we had to eat. No kiss- No nothing.

Re: To John re: gardenias

john h on 1/29/03 at 12:58 (107246)

You are probably right about bringing them in Carole but they need light and seem a lot more hearty than the large variety. With your warmth and humidity you should be in garden heaven.

Re: To John

nancy s. on 1/29/03 at 17:48 (107273)

you're lucky your wife was already married to you, john. if she'd been just a girlfriend, you might still be a bachelor now.
nancy
.