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Tell me about surgery!!!!

Posted by Rose M. on 2/04/03 at 08:39 (107913)

I am scheduled to have surgery on both feet in several weeks. One is plantar fasciitis and the other is a Morton's neuroma. I would like to know what it is like after the surgery. I fear I will not be able to walk at all for a while. I welcome suggestions about anything. I am afraid and I hope I am doing the right thing. Thanks so much for your help. Rose

Re: Tell me about surgery!!!!

Dr. Z on 2/04/03 at 10:38 (107919)

IF you are trying to avoid the surgical release of the plantar fascia ESWT should be your choice. This is a non-invasive procedure It has no serious complications or down time that you will have with your plantar fascia foot surgery.
If you should decide to have the pf release the recovery time depends on the procedure. You may need a cast. You may need crutches. PF foot surgery takes up to six months to heal. In addition your surgery is planning to do an excision of an neuroma on the other foot.
If you would more information about ESWT or any other information about the recovery time for pf surgery feel fee to e-mail Dr. Z at foot.care @verizon.net

Re: Tell me about surgery!!!!

BrianG on 2/04/03 at 23:19 (108034)

Hi Rose,

Have you taken the time to read down this message board about others who have had surgery? It should really be a last option, as there is no going back, once you've been cut. Quite a few people end up 'worse' after surgery, then before they went in. Try to educate yourself about what can happen, and how good your doctor's reputation is.

Good luck
BrianG

Re: Tell me about surgery!!!!

Julie on 2/05/03 at 02:52 (108043)

Rose, you've been given good advice here. I hope you will decide to at least postpone surgery and take time to explore all your options. Have you been through the range of conservative treatments that are available for plantar fasciitis?

Do read the heel pain book, and do consider ESWT.

If you eventually decide to go ahead with the PF surgery, at least schedule it for a different date than the neuroma surgery. If you have both feet operated at the same time you will be totally off your feet for as long as it takes to heal, which means you will need constant support and help.

Re: Tell me about surgery!!!!

Dr. Z on 2/04/03 at 10:38 (107919)

IF you are trying to avoid the surgical release of the plantar fascia ESWT should be your choice. This is a non-invasive procedure It has no serious complications or down time that you will have with your plantar fascia foot surgery.
If you should decide to have the pf release the recovery time depends on the procedure. You may need a cast. You may need crutches. PF foot surgery takes up to six months to heal. In addition your surgery is planning to do an excision of an neuroma on the other foot.
If you would more information about ESWT or any other information about the recovery time for pf surgery feel fee to e-mail Dr. Z at foot.care @verizon.net

Re: Tell me about surgery!!!!

BrianG on 2/04/03 at 23:19 (108034)

Hi Rose,

Have you taken the time to read down this message board about others who have had surgery? It should really be a last option, as there is no going back, once you've been cut. Quite a few people end up 'worse' after surgery, then before they went in. Try to educate yourself about what can happen, and how good your doctor's reputation is.

Good luck
BrianG

Re: Tell me about surgery!!!!

Julie on 2/05/03 at 02:52 (108043)

Rose, you've been given good advice here. I hope you will decide to at least postpone surgery and take time to explore all your options. Have you been through the range of conservative treatments that are available for plantar fasciitis?

Do read the heel pain book, and do consider ESWT.

If you eventually decide to go ahead with the PF surgery, at least schedule it for a different date than the neuroma surgery. If you have both feet operated at the same time you will be totally off your feet for as long as it takes to heal, which means you will need constant support and help.