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re: space exploration

Posted by JudyS on 2/04/03 at 21:16 (108021)

It's so hard to say whether or not Uncle Sam is spending our money wisely - well OK, for the most part he's not - but it seems certain to me that spending it on space exploration is a necessity. It is inevitible that people will be in space on a regular basis sooner or later so it seems wise to me to be on the cutting edge in order to make it as beneficial as possible. In fact, I kinda wish that Uncle Sam would not cut that particular budget - this weekend's tragedy may certainly be evidence of that.

Re: re: space exploration

Carole C in NOLA on 2/04/03 at 21:59 (108025)

A peripheral economic concern related to all of this may affect the New Orleans area. If the shuttle launch schedule isn't resumed expeditiously, for whatever reasons, good or bad, then as a result we are expecting about 50 percent of the 2000 personnel working at the Lockheed facility at Michoud to be laid off.

Michoud makes the huge external fuel tanks, which are expendible. Due to storage constraints for these gigantic fuel tanks, they must simply shut down the plant if the schedule is delayed much at all. Because this is an area with a severely depressed economy already, this layoff would have a devastating effect. After the shuttle disaster in 1986, the same thing happened at Michoud although the economy was in far better shape then than now.

Many of those laid off in 1986 were engineers, scientists, and skilled technicians. Michoud is about the only big aerospace employer around here, although there are one or two other big employers such as Avondale shipyards. There simply is no work here, no possible capability to absorb half of Michoud if they are given their pink slips as the press predicts. A thousand families will suddenly face a loss of income, and have to move elsewhere to look for employment. And, from what I hear, even though Louisiana may be the worst, there is precious little work available these days anywhere in the U.S. Some of these families will be split up and the human toll would be so dire.

I know this seems so small of a problem when compared with the huge issues of whether to continue space exploration, and the lives and deaths of the astronauts that died last weekend. But it could be a death knell to our already staggering economy here and a terrible blow to some families. Some would be fine no matter what, but in other families lives would be shattered.

CArole C

Re: re: space exploration

Ed Davis, DPM on 2/04/03 at 23:52 (108039)

Judy:

Check out the following web site: http://www.spacedaily.com

It will give you a good idea about the spinoff technologies of the space program.
Ed

Re: re: space exploration

nigel B on 2/05/03 at 03:25 (108049)

I must say -I couldnt help wondering whether 12 weeks floating in a space station would cure my PF ! I mean that in the nicest way -it simply shows how much PF is always in my thoughts even during such an awful event.

Re: re: space exploration

pala on 2/05/03 at 07:40 (108059)

i know what you mean nigel. i wish gravity could be suspended. maybe just on sundays. then we could leap about.

Re: re: space exploration

john h on 2/05/03 at 10:57 (108083)

Nigel: I have always wondered what a couple of weeks in a weightless no gravity envioment would do for PF and any problems with the spine.

Re: re: space exploration

nigel B on 2/06/03 at 03:12 (108161)

come on then John-lets volunteer! I live near Yorkshire England so could bring plenty of Theakstons beer and black pudding.

(mind you they would probably decide to send a monkey instead)

Re: re: space exploration

Carole C in NOLA on 2/06/03 at 07:36 (108175)

If NASA won't take you two into space, you can achieve almost the same weightlessness by floating in water.

Summer is coming, and I envision the two of you spending lots of time floating in a pool in the sunshine. Maybe your health insurance would pay for your pool fees as a medical expense. :)

Carole C

Re: re: space exploration

nigel B on 2/06/03 at 10:02 (108197)

the NHS will lend me a pool but it would probably be a flooded quarry pit somewhere full of old shopping trollies

Re: re: space exploration

john h on 2/06/03 at 10:24 (108200)

you can also put an aircraft in a negative G position and achieve weightlessness. In the early days that is how they trained astronauts. You coud take a C-130 put it into a climb and as you roll it forward you go into a negative G condition allowing people in the back to float around.

Re: re: space exploration

pala on 2/06/03 at 11:10 (108207)

what is nhs?

Re: re: space exploration

Carole C in NOLA on 2/06/03 at 11:24 (108209)

England's National Health Service, I think?

Nigel, if they give you a quarry be sure it has a view. (grin)

Carole C

Re: re: space exploration

Carole C in NOLA on 2/06/03 at 11:26 (108210)

Gee, do you suppose that your insurance would pay for flight time in a C-130? I know you wouldn't be happy with another pilot doing the flying and you just floating around...... :)

Carole C

Re: re: space exploration

Nancy N on 2/06/03 at 12:10 (108216)

When I was a freshman in college in 1989, my engineering class--yes, I once labored under the delusion that I wanted to be an engineer--was visited by an astronaut named Andy Allen. He told us about the plane (which I remember as a DC-10 but that could be because it's one of the only plane numbers I know!), so apparently they were still using it then. I think it was also used to film Apollo 13, so perhaps it's still around? At any rate, he told us that it was affectionately known as the 'Vomit Comet,' which of course is the part that's always stuck in my mind!

Re: re: space exploration

Nigel B on 2/06/03 at 13:06 (108218)

Yes sorry, it's the National Health Service-paid for by taxes but free at the point of delivery (except a useful non-harmful expensive treatment like eswt of course)

Re: re: space exploration

pala on 2/06/03 at 14:07 (108235)

how nice. everyone in england gets more or less decent medical help for free? here you pay out most of what you have worked all your life for, for a high tech attractive quarry pit. wether you need it or not. if there's another nickel of profit for them, they'll throw you in head first, and forget to fill it with water. then theyl'll treat your head injuries with high tech trolly carts that are very attractive and that will cost the rest of what you and your ffamily own. i love the american medical system. your not missing much, i suspect, nigel.

Re: re: space exploration

JudyS on 2/07/03 at 10:54 (108340)

I'd be happy to be the experimental 'floater arounder' on that flight....

Re: re: space exploration

Carole C in NOLA on 2/04/03 at 21:59 (108025)

A peripheral economic concern related to all of this may affect the New Orleans area. If the shuttle launch schedule isn't resumed expeditiously, for whatever reasons, good or bad, then as a result we are expecting about 50 percent of the 2000 personnel working at the Lockheed facility at Michoud to be laid off.

Michoud makes the huge external fuel tanks, which are expendible. Due to storage constraints for these gigantic fuel tanks, they must simply shut down the plant if the schedule is delayed much at all. Because this is an area with a severely depressed economy already, this layoff would have a devastating effect. After the shuttle disaster in 1986, the same thing happened at Michoud although the economy was in far better shape then than now.

Many of those laid off in 1986 were engineers, scientists, and skilled technicians. Michoud is about the only big aerospace employer around here, although there are one or two other big employers such as Avondale shipyards. There simply is no work here, no possible capability to absorb half of Michoud if they are given their pink slips as the press predicts. A thousand families will suddenly face a loss of income, and have to move elsewhere to look for employment. And, from what I hear, even though Louisiana may be the worst, there is precious little work available these days anywhere in the U.S. Some of these families will be split up and the human toll would be so dire.

I know this seems so small of a problem when compared with the huge issues of whether to continue space exploration, and the lives and deaths of the astronauts that died last weekend. But it could be a death knell to our already staggering economy here and a terrible blow to some families. Some would be fine no matter what, but in other families lives would be shattered.

CArole C

Re: re: space exploration

Ed Davis, DPM on 2/04/03 at 23:52 (108039)

Judy:

Check out the following web site: http://www.spacedaily.com

It will give you a good idea about the spinoff technologies of the space program.
Ed

Re: re: space exploration

nigel B on 2/05/03 at 03:25 (108049)

I must say -I couldnt help wondering whether 12 weeks floating in a space station would cure my PF ! I mean that in the nicest way -it simply shows how much PF is always in my thoughts even during such an awful event.

Re: re: space exploration

pala on 2/05/03 at 07:40 (108059)

i know what you mean nigel. i wish gravity could be suspended. maybe just on sundays. then we could leap about.

Re: re: space exploration

john h on 2/05/03 at 10:57 (108083)

Nigel: I have always wondered what a couple of weeks in a weightless no gravity envioment would do for PF and any problems with the spine.

Re: re: space exploration

nigel B on 2/06/03 at 03:12 (108161)

come on then John-lets volunteer! I live near Yorkshire England so could bring plenty of Theakstons beer and black pudding.

(mind you they would probably decide to send a monkey instead)

Re: re: space exploration

Carole C in NOLA on 2/06/03 at 07:36 (108175)

If NASA won't take you two into space, you can achieve almost the same weightlessness by floating in water.

Summer is coming, and I envision the two of you spending lots of time floating in a pool in the sunshine. Maybe your health insurance would pay for your pool fees as a medical expense. :)

Carole C

Re: re: space exploration

nigel B on 2/06/03 at 10:02 (108197)

the NHS will lend me a pool but it would probably be a flooded quarry pit somewhere full of old shopping trollies

Re: re: space exploration

john h on 2/06/03 at 10:24 (108200)

you can also put an aircraft in a negative G position and achieve weightlessness. In the early days that is how they trained astronauts. You coud take a C-130 put it into a climb and as you roll it forward you go into a negative G condition allowing people in the back to float around.

Re: re: space exploration

pala on 2/06/03 at 11:10 (108207)

what is nhs?

Re: re: space exploration

Carole C in NOLA on 2/06/03 at 11:24 (108209)

England's National Health Service, I think?

Nigel, if they give you a quarry be sure it has a view. (grin)

Carole C

Re: re: space exploration

Carole C in NOLA on 2/06/03 at 11:26 (108210)

Gee, do you suppose that your insurance would pay for flight time in a C-130? I know you wouldn't be happy with another pilot doing the flying and you just floating around...... :)

Carole C

Re: re: space exploration

Nancy N on 2/06/03 at 12:10 (108216)

When I was a freshman in college in 1989, my engineering class--yes, I once labored under the delusion that I wanted to be an engineer--was visited by an astronaut named Andy Allen. He told us about the plane (which I remember as a DC-10 but that could be because it's one of the only plane numbers I know!), so apparently they were still using it then. I think it was also used to film Apollo 13, so perhaps it's still around? At any rate, he told us that it was affectionately known as the 'Vomit Comet,' which of course is the part that's always stuck in my mind!

Re: re: space exploration

Nigel B on 2/06/03 at 13:06 (108218)

Yes sorry, it's the National Health Service-paid for by taxes but free at the point of delivery (except a useful non-harmful expensive treatment like eswt of course)

Re: re: space exploration

pala on 2/06/03 at 14:07 (108235)

how nice. everyone in england gets more or less decent medical help for free? here you pay out most of what you have worked all your life for, for a high tech attractive quarry pit. wether you need it or not. if there's another nickel of profit for them, they'll throw you in head first, and forget to fill it with water. then theyl'll treat your head injuries with high tech trolly carts that are very attractive and that will cost the rest of what you and your ffamily own. i love the american medical system. your not missing much, i suspect, nigel.

Re: re: space exploration

JudyS on 2/07/03 at 10:54 (108340)

I'd be happy to be the experimental 'floater arounder' on that flight....