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Foot Deformity

Posted by Marilyn on 2/08/03 at 22:08 (108533)

Hello:

10 years ago when I was diagnosed with Diabetese, my right foot formed a bunion causing my toes to move over to the right. I have been seeing a specialist regarding having it fixed (my blood sugars are excellent) and just the other day, he said he wanted me to see a Nurologist. This doesn't make sense to me. What can be the problem and should I worry about a brain tumour?

Please respond.

Thanks!

Re: Foot Deformity

Dr. Z on 2/08/03 at 23:37 (108542)

The examinating doctor should have performed a neurological testing of your lower extemity. This will include evaluating your reflexes, muscle strenght. sharp/dull sensation. babinski sign, muscle tone and size I doubt your diabetes has anything to do with your present bunion problem. So there must have been something abnormal. He should of explained to you the reasons why you need further consutation. Ask him. Did you say anything about he neurologist consult

Re: Foot Deformity

Julie on 2/09/03 at 04:34 (108545)

Marilyn

I'm not a doctor, but would imagine the foot specialist thought it would be wise for you to see a neurologist simply in order to check whether bunion surgery might have any adverse effects. As you know, with diabetes everything to do with the feet has to be undertaken with caution. But as Dr Z says, the way to find out why he wants you to see a neurologist is to ask him.

May I ask if your bunion is giving you a great deal of pain? Doctors do not generally recommend bunion surgery unless this is the case. There are risks attached to all surgery, and the advice has been given many times on this website not to have surgery unless the bunion gives unliveable-with pain. It should never be done for cosmetic reasons. (I'm not suggesting that's what you're doing, but thought I'd mention it because you describe your bunion not as painful, but as having caused your toes to move to the right.)

I've got the same sort of bunion on my left foot. All the toes have been moving steadily to the left for at least 40 years, but it gives me no pain, and the doctors here all told me 'If it ain't broke, don't fix it'. And they advised someone here just the other day not to have it for a bunion that was causing mild discomfort - they said the results wouldn't be satisfactory.

So do think very carefully about surgery, and have it only if it is really necessary to get you out of pain.

Re: Foot Deformity

Dr. Z on 2/08/03 at 23:37 (108542)

The examinating doctor should have performed a neurological testing of your lower extemity. This will include evaluating your reflexes, muscle strenght. sharp/dull sensation. babinski sign, muscle tone and size I doubt your diabetes has anything to do with your present bunion problem. So there must have been something abnormal. He should of explained to you the reasons why you need further consutation. Ask him. Did you say anything about he neurologist consult

Re: Foot Deformity

Julie on 2/09/03 at 04:34 (108545)

Marilyn

I'm not a doctor, but would imagine the foot specialist thought it would be wise for you to see a neurologist simply in order to check whether bunion surgery might have any adverse effects. As you know, with diabetes everything to do with the feet has to be undertaken with caution. But as Dr Z says, the way to find out why he wants you to see a neurologist is to ask him.

May I ask if your bunion is giving you a great deal of pain? Doctors do not generally recommend bunion surgery unless this is the case. There are risks attached to all surgery, and the advice has been given many times on this website not to have surgery unless the bunion gives unliveable-with pain. It should never be done for cosmetic reasons. (I'm not suggesting that's what you're doing, but thought I'd mention it because you describe your bunion not as painful, but as having caused your toes to move to the right.)

I've got the same sort of bunion on my left foot. All the toes have been moving steadily to the left for at least 40 years, but it gives me no pain, and the doctors here all told me 'If it ain't broke, don't fix it'. And they advised someone here just the other day not to have it for a bunion that was causing mild discomfort - they said the results wouldn't be satisfactory.

So do think very carefully about surgery, and have it only if it is really necessary to get you out of pain.