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Will marathons cause irreprable damage?

Posted by Steve M on 6/09/03 at 21:35 (121415)

I was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis at the beginning of the year. I have been taking an oral medication (Naprocen) proscribed by my podiatrist to calm the pain. It has worked very well (although it is not completely gone).

I started training this weekend for the AIDS Marathon in January 2004. Will running a marathon (even with 6 months training) cause irreprable damage to someone with plantar fasciitis?

The marathon (run/walk) is for a very good cause and I really want to do it, but if it is going to screw up my foot for the rest of my life I'd rather know now so I can bow out gracefully.

I really appreciate any advice you can give me. THANKS!!!!

Re: Will marathons cause irreprable damage?

Dr. Z on 6/09/03 at 23:01 (121421)

If there is micro-tearing in the plantar fascia then yes your condition could turn into a chronic pf or what is called a fasciosis. An ultra-sound with a complete hands on examination will tell you exactly where you are in the healing process and what you should or shouldn't be doing .

Re: Will marathons cause irreprable damage?

Annette on 6/10/03 at 07:27 (121429)

Hi Steve,
I would listen to Dr Z and have an examination first. I made the mistake of running a marathon in 1999 with PF (I didn't know
what it was then) and I am sorry to say that I have not been able to run much since then, except a pathetic three miles here and
there. If I knew what I was doing to my foot I would have not run until my foot was in better condition.
good luck to you Steve.
Annette

Re: Will marathons cause irreprable damage?

Dr. David S. Wander on 6/11/03 at 16:09 (121575)

Steve,

I agree with Dr. Zuckerman. If it is mild and the fascia is well supported by your running shoes and/or orthoses, it MAY be OK. But, I certainly would not run 26.2 miles without first speaking with your doctor, to prevent a potential chronic condition.