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I need help...something is wrong with my left foot!

Posted by marie on 10/20/03 at 15:51 (134742)

When I took off my shoes and socks I noticed a strange growth right over my Tarsal Tunnel on my left foot. I have posted a photo. Please look at it and see what you think!

http://www.shutterfly.com/osi.jsp?i=67b0de21b350c888251a

best wishes marie

Re: I need help...something is wrong with my left foot!

nancy s. on 10/20/03 at 16:07 (134747)

what a gorgeous tumor!

bless you, marie, you made me laugh out loud!

thank you from nancy
.
p.s. you ought to sell those. i'd buy one. it's a far better-looking foot than either of mine.
.

Re: I need help...something is wrong with my left foot!

Suzanne D. on 10/20/03 at 20:14 (134762)

Marie, you got me! Here I was getting worried about what might be wrong with your foot! :D

Those socks would fit right into my wardrobe. Today I wore a white pair with ghosts, cats, and bats on them. I figure if I have to wear 'ugly' SAS tie-up shoes, I might as well wear cute socks!

Suzanne :)

Re: Something for my friends!

marie on 10/20/03 at 20:59 (134769)

Suzanne you may be intereted in this. Sometimes we don't realize the importance of friendship...how it helps us heal here, how it can change someone's life who feels desperate, in pain and alone! A part of healing we may have forgotten about but just as important. My nephew sent it to me today, he's a teacher in Plymouth MI. I am proud of him. He has cerebal Paulsey...makes my condition look like nothing...he also coaches seventh grade girls basketball....the team made it to the state finals. He is truely an inspiration to all. Please read!

One day, when I was a freshman in high school, I saw
>> a kid from my class was walking home from school. His
>> name was Kyle. It looked like he was carrying all of his
>> books. I thought to myself, 'Why would anyone bring
>> home all his books on a Friday? He must really be a
>> nerd.'
>>
>> I had quite a weekend planned (parties and a football
>> game with my friends tomorrow afternoon), so I
>> shrugged my shoulders and went on.
>>
>> As I was walking, I saw a bunch of kids running toward
>> him. They ran at him, knocking all his books out of his
>> arms and tripping him so he landed in the dirt. His glasses
>> went flying, and I saw them land in the grass about ten
>> feet from him. He looked up and I saw this terrible
>> sadness in his eyes.
>>
>> My heart went out to him. So, I jogged over to him and
>> as he crawled around looking for his glasses, and I saw
>> a tear in his eye. As I handed him his glasses, I said,
>> 'Those guys are jerks. They really should get lives.' He
>>looked
>> at me and said, 'Hey thanks!' There was a big smile on his
>>face. It was one of those smiles that showed real gratitude.
>>
>> I helped him pick up his books, and asked him where
>> he lived. As it turned out, he lived near me, so I asked him
>> why I had never seen him before. He said he had gone to
>>private
>> school before now.
>>
>> I would have never hung out with a private school kid
>> before. We talked all the way home, and I carried some
>> of his books. He turned out to be a pretty cool kid. I
>> asked him if he wanted to play a little football with my
>> friends. He said yes. We hung out all weekend and the
>> more I got to know Kyle, the more I liked him, and my
>> friends thought the same of him.
>>
>> Monday morning came, and there was Kyle with the
>> huge stack of books again. I stopped him and said,
>> 'Boy, you are gonna really build some serious muscles
>> with this pile of books everyday!' He just laughed and
>> handed me half the books.
>>
>> Over the next four years, Kyle and I became best
>> friends. When we were seniors, we began to think
>> about college. Kyle decided on Georgetown, and I
>> was going to Duke. I knew that we would always be
>> friends, that the miles would never be a problem. He
>> was going to be a doctor, and I was going for business
>> on a football scholarship.
>>
>> Kyle was valedictorian of our class. I teased him all the
>> time about being a nerd. He had to prepare a speech for
>> graduation.
>>
>> I was so glad it wasn't me having to get up there and
>> speak. Graduation day, I saw Kyle. He looked great. He
>> was one of those guys that really found himself during high
>> school. He filled out and actually looked good in glasses.
>> He had more dates than I had and all the girls loved him.
>> Boy, sometimes I was jealous.
>>
>> Today was one of those days. I could see that he was
>> nervous about his speech. So, I smacked him on the back
>> and said, 'Hey, big guy, you'll be great!' He looked at me
>> with one of those looks (the really grateful one) and
>>smiled.
>> 'Thanks,' he said.
>>
>> As he started his speech, he cleared his throat, and
>> began. 'Graduation is a time to thank those who helped
>> you make it through those tough years. Your parents,
>> your teachers, your siblings, maybe a coach...but mostly
>> your friends. I am here to tell all of you that being a
>> friend to someone is the best gift you can give them. I
>> am going to tell you a story.'
>>
>> I just looked at my friend with disbelief as he told the
>> story of the first day we met. He had planned to kill
>> himself over the weekend. He talked of how he had
>> cleaned out his locker so his Mom wouldn't have to do
>> it later and was carrying his stuff home. He looked hard at
>>me and gave me a little smile.
>>
>> 'Thankfully, I was saved. My friend saved me from
>> doing the unspeakable.'
>>
>> I heard the gasp go through the crowd as this handsome,
>>popular
>> boy told us all about his weakest moment. I saw his Mom and
>>dad looking at me and smiling that same
>> grateful smile. Not until that moment did I realize it's
>>depth.
>>
>> Never underestimate the power of your actions. With
>> one small gesture you can change a person's life. For
>> better or for worse.
>>
>> God puts us all in each other's lives to impact one another
>> in some way. Look for God in others.
>>
>> You now have two choices, you can:
>> 1) Pass this on to your friends or
>> 2) Delete it and act like it didn't touch your heart.
>>
>> As you can see, I took choice number 1. 'Friends are
>> angels who lift us to our feet when our wings have
>> trouble remembering how to fly.'
>>
>> There is no beginning or end.Yesterday is history.
>>
>> Tomorrow is mystery.
>>
>> Today is a gift.
>>
>> It's National Friendship Week. Show your friends
>> how much you care. Send this to everyone you
>> consider a FRIEND. If it comes back to you, then
>> you'll know you have a circle of friends.
>>

best wishes marie

Re: Something for my friends!

Suzanne D. on 10/20/03 at 22:30 (134786)

What a truly powerful story, Marie! Thank you for sharing it. Yes, I DID appreciate it.

And best wishes to your nephew.

Suzanne :)

Re: along the same lines...

Suzanne D on 10/21/03 at 15:33 (134832)

Here's an e-mail I received today. It has the same type message as yours, Marie, and I thought it was inspiring.

If Max is still reading, he should appreciate it since the story is about a cab driver.

Suzanne :)

THE CAB RIDE
>>> >
>>> >Twenty years ago, I drove a cab for a living. When I arrived
>>>at2:30 a.m., the building was dark except for a single light in a
>>>ground floor window. Under these circumstances,
>>> many drivers would just honk once or twice, wait a minute,
>>>then drive away.
>>> >
>>> >But, I had seen too many impoverished people who depended on
>>>taxis as their only means of transportation. Unless a situation
>>>smelled of danger, I always went to the door. This passenger might
>>>be someone who needs my assistance, I reasoned to myself.
>>> >
>>> >So I walked to the door and knocked. 'Just a minute', answered a
>>>frail, elderly voice. I could hear something being dragged across
>>>the floor.
>>> >
>>> >After a long pause, the door opened. A small woman in her 80's
>>>stood before me. She was wearing a print dress and a pillbox hat
>>>with a veil pinned on it, like somebody out of a 1940s movie. By
>>>her side was a small nylon suitcase. The apartment looked as if
>>>no one had lived in it for years. All the furniture was covered
>>>with sheets.
>>> >
>>> >There were no clocks on the walls, no knickknacks or utensils on
>>>the counters. In the corner was a cardboard box filled with photos
>>>and glassware. 'Would you carry my bag out to the car?' she said.
>>>I took the suitcase to the cab, then returned to assist the woman.
>>>She took my arm and we walked slowly toward the curb. She kept
>>>thanking me for my kindness.
>>>
>>> >'It's nothing', I told her. 'I just try to treat my passengers
>>>the way I would want my mother treated'. 'Oh, you're such a good
>>>boy', she said.
>>> >
>>> >When we got in the cab, she gave me an address, then asked,
>>>'Could you drive through downtown?' 'It's not the shortest way,'
>>>I answered quickly.
>>>
>>> >'Oh, I don't mind,' she said. 'I'm in no hurry. I'm on my way to
>>>a hospice'.
>>> >
>>> >I looked in the rear-view mirror. Her eyes were glistening. 'I
>>>don't have any family left,' she continued. 'The doctor says I
>>>don't have very long.'
>>> >
>>> >I quietly reached over and shut off the meter. 'What route would
>>>you like me to take?' I asked.
>>> >
>>> >For the next two hours, we drove through the city. She showed me
>>>the building where she had once worked as an elevator operator. We
>>>drove through the neighbourhood where she and her husband had
>>>lived when they were newlyweds. She had me pull up in front of a
>>>furniture warehouse that had once been a ballroom where she had
>>>gone dancing as a girl.
>>> >
>>> >Sometimes she'd ask me to slow in front of a particular building
>>>or corner and would sit staring into the darkness, saying nothing.
>>> >
>>> >As the first hint of sun was creasing the horizon, she suddenly
>>>said, 'I'm tired. Let's go now.'
>>> >
>>> >We drove in silence to the address she had given me. It was a
>>>low building, like a small convalescent home, with a driveway that
>>>passed under a portico.
>>> >
>>> >Two orderlies came out to the cab as soon as we pulled up. They
>>>were solicitous and intent, watching her every move. They must
>>>have been expecting her.
>>> >
>>> >I opened the trunk and took the small suitcase to the door. The
>>>woman was already seated in a wheelchair.
>>> >
>>> >'How much do I owe you?' she asked, reaching into her purse.
>>>'Nothing,' I said. 'You have to make a living,' she answered.
>>>'There are other passengers,' I responded.
>>> >
>>> >Almost without thinking, I bent and gave her a hug. She held
>>>onto me tightly. 'You gave an old woman a little moment of joy,'
>>>she said. 'Thank you.'
>>> >
>>> >I squeezed her hand, then walked into the dim morning light.
>>>Behind me, a door shut.It was the sound of the closing of a life.
>>> >
>>> >I didn't pick up any more passengers that shift. I drove
>>>aimlessly lost in thought. For the rest of that day, I could
>>>hardly talk.
>>> >
>>> >What if that woman had gotten an angry driver, or one who was
>>>impatient to end his shift?
>>> >
>>> >What if I had refused to take the run, or had honked once, then
>>>driven away? On a quick review, I don't think that I have done
>>>anything more important in my life.
>>> >
>>> >We're conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great
>>>moments. But great moments often catch us unaware-beautifully
>>>wrapped in what others may consider a small one.
>>> >
>>> >PEOPLE MAY NOT REMEMBER EXACTLY WHAT 'YOU DID, OR WHAT YOU SAID,
>>> ~BUT ~ THEY WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL.
>>> >

Re: along the same lines...

marie on 10/21/03 at 18:29 (134853)

Very special story Suzanne! Thanks so much for sharing.

best wishes marie