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What id dorsiflexion?

Posted by Buck T. on 2/03/04 at 09:45 (143536)

Can anyone describe dorsiflexion? Think it is how far one can bend foot back at ankle. Is there a way at home to determine your Dorsiflexion?
What is good and what is poor?

Buck

Re: What id dorsiflexion?

Richard, C.Ped on 2/03/04 at 10:40 (143543)

Dorsiflexion is the motion when you 'lift' your forefoot upwards. Put your foot flat on the floor, then lift your toes and forefoot toward your knee while leaving your heel on the floor. That is dorsiflexion. Plantarflexion is just the opposite.

Re: What id dorsiflexion?

Pauline on 2/03/04 at 16:32 (143570)

Richard,
What is consider a normal angle for a good dorsiflex movement and is it possible for everyone to achieve it with only stretching?

Re: What id dorsiflexion?

Dr. David S. Wander on 2/03/04 at 19:27 (143581)

Normal is at least 10 degrees of dorsiflexion. Not all patients can achieve this, even with stretching. Some patients can have a bony block that limits the amount of dorsiflexion available.

Re: What id dorsiflexion?

Julie on 2/04/04 at 01:28 (143596)

Dr Wander

Ten degrees from what? From full plantar flexion? Could you elaborate? I thought the angle of dorsiflexion was described as the angle reached by the foot when it is in full dorsiflexion - i.e. 90 degrees: a little more with more than average flexibility, less with reduced flexibility.
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Re: What id dorsiflexion?

Dr. David S. Wander on 2/04/04 at 19:15 (143642)

IF you have your foot perpendicular to your leg, the amount of dorsiflexion should be approximately 10 degrees. You should be able to move your foot 10 degrees past perpendicular, (towards your knee). Hope this helps.

Re: What is dorsiflexion?

Julie on 2/05/04 at 02:09 (143654)

Thank you: yes, it does, but let me check. If you can move your foot that 10 degrees, you then have an 80 degree angle between foot and leg. I would say, from my observation of many feet, that this may be more dorsiflexion than most people have.

I'd be interested to know how you judge the angle. Would you have the patient standing (presumably that's perpendicular) and raise his/her toes? Or would you have the patient sitting, with one leg outstretched and the foot against a wall?

Only if you have time to answer!
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Re: What is dorsiflexion?

Dr. David S. Wander on 2/05/04 at 07:45 (143660)

Yes, most patients do not have 10 degrees dorsiflexion and are 'tight'. We measure by having the patient sitting with his/her legs straight out on a table/chair. With the foot at 90 degrees to the leg, we use a measuring device with one arm of the device parallel to the foot, and one arm of the device parallel to the leg. As we dorsiflex the foot, the arm of the device parallel to the foot will move and then the measurement is checked (the device is calibrated in degrees). Therefore, if there is 10 degrees of dorsiflexion, the angle between the foot and leg are 80 degrees as you've stated.

Re: What is dorsiflexion?

Julie on 2/05/04 at 08:21 (143661)

Many thanks, Dr Wander.
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Re: What id dorsiflexion?

Julie on 2/05/04 at 08:26 (143662)

Buck, I don't think anyone has answered the second part of your original question. In the heel pain book, Scott describes a method of determining the angle of dorsiflexion at home - if you read the book thoroughly you should find it. Or a search of the book on 'dorsiflexion' or 'angle of dorsiflexion may turn it up.
.

Re: What is dorsiflexion?

Julie on 2/05/04 at 08:31 (143664)

Buck, I just looked to see if I could find that method, and couldn't, but I found this:

'Weak foot muscles that control the toes and ball of the foot may contribute to plantar fasciitis, because these muscles may promote better functioning of the foot.'

I'm sure they do. This may interest you (and Ron) because you were both asking about the yoga toe exercise.
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