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Dr. Z & Dr Ed

Posted by john h on 7/20/04 at 11:32 (155917)

What do you gentlemen think of this device. It is FDA approved. We have discussed this type of therapy in the past. I see the San Diego Padres and the Australian Olympic team use it. The nearest person I could find to me who uses it is in Fayetteville, Arkansas. I would like your opinions:

http://www.cti-net.com/photonic_stim/default.asp

Re: Dr. Z & Dr Ed

Marty from SLC on 7/20/04 at 12:39 (155919)

john,

Ed commented on this about 2 weeks ago. It seem to me like he said some of his patiants get some relief but i'n not sure about that. You could do a search, the subject was 'light therapy'

Re: Dr. Z & Dr Ed

Ed Davis, DPM on 7/21/04 at 14:35 (155994)

John:
I would be somewhat sceptical. Photons refer to 'packets' of light since light acts both as wave and 'particle.' There have been many light emitting devices that have come and gone through the decades. None have really stood the test of time.
Ed

Re: Dr. Z & Dr Ed

Ed Davis, DPM on 7/21/04 at 15:46 (156002)

John:
I think that one issue with light emitting devices is the limited penetration in terms of depth.
Ed

Re: Dr. Z & Dr Ed

Dorothy on 7/22/04 at 00:02 (156022)

Dr. Ed - I am not challenging your opinion on this topic because I really don't know, but your opinion does seem to contradict other information that I read from seemingly reputable, informed sources that say (a certain form of?) infrared light does, in fact, help people with peripheral/diabetic neuropathy. Are you saying that this is not true? Doesn't NASA say it is true? Aren't there other studies that say it is true? I am not challenging you, but I am asking you to support your implied dismissal of the kind of light therapy (such as Anodyne light therapy, one that I have read about)that purports to be effective....??
What I have read is that it stimulates the body's production of nitric oxide which causes vasomotor dilation which causes some improvement in the neuropathic condition. I don't have this condition and hope I never do, but I feel for people who do have it and think it must be hellish and frightening - so I would hope that if you are discouraging them from trying it, you are basing that opinion on solid, current information.

Re: Dr. Z & Dr Ed

Ed Davis, DPM on 7/22/04 at 19:17 (156082)

Dorothy:
There may be an effect on diabetic neuropathy because this type of neuropathy involves the small nerves very close to the surface of the skin. A local podiatrist who has a practice composed primarily of diabetics told me that he sees a beneficial effect of IR light (Anodyne) on diabetic neuropathy for that reason but very little response on patients with TTS because the entrapment is deeper. The same situation exists with PF -- we are looking at a structure even deeper than the posterior tibial nerve in TTS.

I would encourage those with diabetic neuropathy to try Anodyne. Patients with PF could try it as it would not harm them but, like any treatment, there is a cost involved and one has to consider the benefit to cost ratio.
Ed

Re: Dr. Z & Dr Ed

Dorothy on 7/22/04 at 19:59 (156084)

Dr. Ed:

Thanks for the clarification. I'm sure this will be helpful information for many here.