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Results of Nerve Testing

Posted by Darlene on 8/16/04 at 11:03 (158079)

I'm wondering if you could help me out with a little anatomy lesson.

My testing shows problems with the deep peroneal nerve, heel and superficial peroneal nerve.

Would you kindly let me know what these nerves innervate and how to minimize stress to them?

Thank you.

Darlene

Re: Results of Nerve Testing

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/16/04 at 21:57 (158188)

Darlene:
They become separate nerves just below the outside of the knee joint and emerge on top of the foot. Turning the foot in and over can stress them in the region of the foot/ankle.
Ed

Re: Thank you Dr. Ed

Darlene on 8/17/04 at 00:14 (158198)

My half lotus position with the ball of my foot facing the ceiling must be causig trouble.

Darlee

Re: Thank you Dr. Ed

Julie on 8/17/04 at 02:41 (158201)

Darlene, based on Dr Ed's information, that sounds like good thinking to me. I guess you need to consider another sitting position for meditation. Any of the classic meditation postures will turn the feet 'in and over', though a simple crossed-leg pose does it to not quite the same degree. Vajrasana, the kneeling posture, shouldn't be held for more than ten minutes (especially if one has varicose veins) because it cuts off the circulation in the lower extremities. And it's hard on the ankles too, albeit differently hard. A meditation stool, which allows space between the bottom and the heels, is a good alternative.

Have you tried sitting in a chair (the 'Egyptian' position)? Its drawback is that you aren't in such good contact with the ground, but the most important thing about any seated posture is that the spine is held upright and lengthened, and that can be done in a chair (preferably a straight-backed one).

Anyway, I would certainly give half lotus a miss for now, and see if that makes any difference.
.

Re: Results of Nerve Testing

Julie on 8/17/04 at 02:45 (158202)

Ed

I was interested in this explanation. It may explain why some students experience pain in their ankles in meditation poses (other than the discomfort that comes from the malleolus contacting the floor). I shall investigate further. Thanks.
.

Re: Julie

Darlene on 8/17/04 at 10:56 (158238)

Thanks for mentioning the knealing pose. I really like it but I'll have to be careful. I have a couple of wooden yoga blocks that I could use as a meditation stool. If I could just find a good position for using my laptop. My feet don't like to be touching the ground at my desk. Since my foot problem, I've been spending so much time in the half lotus position. Now I'm putting my laptop on my lap on the couch. Probably not a great idea for my back.

Julie - thank you for your ongoing helpful responses. I'm so sorry to hear about your student. I was going to a special yoga class where some people had cancer. The yoga instructor and all the teacher trainees were so supportive. I know it made a world of difference. I recently heard that one of the students with bowel cancer is well on the road to recovery. The yoga group definitely kept her sane through the whole ordeal. Your students are very lucky.

Darlene

Re: Julie

Julie on 8/17/04 at 16:26 (158272)

Hi Darlene

Thank you for kind words and thoughts. Yes, yoga really does make a big difference to cancer patients. There are many reasons why, one of the main ones being that the simple breathing exercises, relaxation and meditation help one to deal with the anxiety, fear and pain of the diagnosis and the treatment. It's nice that you've seen this at work. Have you been practising yoga for awhile?

Back to your sitting posture. I think the blocks might not be very comfortable! If you don't have a meditation stool or can't get hold of one, you might be able to make one. It's a slab of wood about 6' x 15'-18' with legs that raise the slab about 8' off the ground: you kneel with your lower legs under the slab and your bottom on it. I'm guessing at the measurements - it just has to be wide enough for your bottom, and high enough to get your legs under it. It works very well to keep the pressure off the veins in the legs.

A good alternative (and easier than making a stool) is a bolster - or if you haven't got a bolster, a thick blanket. You roll it up, position it under your bottom and between your knees, and sit on it. It makes a nice firm base and also takes the pressure off the veins in the legs.
.

Re: Footrest

HelenEC on 8/17/04 at 16:28 (158273)

I've found it helpful to have a footrest that I can alter the height and angle of under my desk. That way, I can get my feet out of the way without having them resting on the floor. I suppose you could also try resting your feet on a pouffe (do they call those square cushiony things pouffes in the US?)

Re: Julie

Darlene on 8/17/04 at 20:29 (158286)

Thanks for the bolster suggestion. My friend who is in the teacher training program brought one over. I will give it a try tonight.

Actually I was just getting into yoga this past March after my foot problems. Unfortunately it created more problems with my sacroileac joint. The teacher meant well, but truly didn't understand the problem. My joint was already loose and she was focusing on loosening it up.

Guess what? I just tried your blanket suggestion. I rolled it up on the floor like a bolster and I put the laptop on the couch. It feels great!!! There's quite a stretch across the top of my foot. Hopefully it isn't compressing the tarsal tunnel. I will probably know soon enough.

Take care,

Darlene

Re: Julie

Julie on 8/18/04 at 01:32 (158300)

Darlene

Yes: some yoga postures do strain the sacroiliac joint: i.e. the triangle and the warrior, if they're done by turning the hip out to 90 degrees. The hip joint is not meant to rotate to that extent, and trying to make it do so inevitably stresses the SI. (It will also strain the knee joint if the hip joint is less than optimally mobile.) I'm afraid I know this from my own experience (alas) and have long since stopped practising or teaching these postures that way. Once the ligaments that protect the SI are loose you need to be careful how you move the pelvis forever. It's not nice when it goes out, as I guess you know.

Did the teacher really say she was trying to loosen up the SI? If she did, she didn't understand the joint, which is essentially a stable joint, not meant to move. Hormonal changes loosen it in pregnancy to ease the birth, and many women find afterwards that they have permanently hypermobile SIs.

I hope the blanket/bolster proves un-stressful to the tarsal tunnel.
.

Re: Yoga

Darlene on 8/18/04 at 11:26 (158333)

The teacher didn't say that she was trying to loosen up the SI, but she put me into poses that put pressure on it and even used her hands to help 'spread' things. She didn't like to be questioned and expected her students to follow her instructions. She decided that my SI problem was as a result of my foot problem despite the fact that I told her I had the problem before. Yes, it was after child birth. Having said that, she was amazing with the students who had cancer. She sat and talked with them individually at each class. She's a very compassionate woman. I will always remember her for that. I think I'll go with Office Yoga for now. I should be getting the book any day now.

Darlene