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Orthodics - fitting them to a shoe

Posted by Cheryl on 8/16/04 at 12:39 (158097)

I got my first pair of orthodics a year or more ago for help with a bunion. Now I have plantar fascia and have to wear them to relieve pain in my right heel. When I got the orthodics, the doctor who casted them for me wanted to cut the toe part off. I didn't want him to as I thought I would have trouble adjusting to the feel in my shoes. But the other day, I had to wear them as I was in so much pain so I cut some of the toe area off. I tried to call the doctor to see how much to cut off but he didn't return my call. I can get another pair if I need them but I wanted to know, does anyone cut the toes off? I have very wide feet but a very narrow heel so I can't wear wide widths and finding shoes with the extra width for the orthodics is very hard. I am getting relief wearing the 'cut' orthodics but don't know if I did the right thing. PS I am going to get a new doctor.

Re: Orthodics - fitting them to a shoe

Richard, C.Ped on 8/16/04 at 13:56 (158112)

We pretty much leave the toe area on all our orthosis, pretty much for comfort purposes.

The width of the toe area should not make a difference at all if you wear the same size in each shoe. The end should be trimmed to the width of the insole that came out of the shoe.

If you really want to cut the toe area off, it should be done just proximal to the metatarsal heads. The main problem when someone cuts and makes their orthosis a 3/4 is that there is a 'shelf' where the cut was made. That shelf will be felt while walking and can be very irratating. It can be ground at an angle to relieve pain.

Re: Orthodics - fitting them to a shoe

Richard, C.Ped on 8/16/04 at 13:58 (158115)

Wow, I just responded with a detailed answer, and the darn thing was not saved.

Ill try it again.

The toe area needs to be trimmed to match the toe area of the insole that comes with the shoe. That way, you do not have to worry about the width of the orthotic.

If you really want to cut the toe area off, it should be done just behind the ball of your foot. The only problem is, this creates a 'shelf' that can be quite irritating when walking. That can be ground at an angle for comfort.

Re: Orthodics - fitting them to a shoe

Richard, C.Ped on 8/17/04 at 08:11 (158218)

We pretty much leave the toe area on all our orthosis, pretty much for comfort purposes.

The width of the toe area should not make a difference at all if you wear the same size in each shoe. The end should be trimmed to the width of the insole that came out of the shoe.

If you really want to cut the toe area off, it should be done just proximal to the metatarsal heads. The main problem when someone cuts and makes their orthosis a 3/4 is that there is a 'shelf' where the cut was made. That shelf will be felt while walking and can be very irratating. It can be ground at an angle to relieve pain.

Re: Orthodics - fitting them to a shoe

Cheryl W. on 8/17/04 at 11:33 (158242)

Thanks Richard, I did cut them at the right spot after all, and yes, the rubbing is a little annoying but I will sand them down a little more to correct that. My physical therapist cut hers too, and said she got used to hers after wearing them a while.

Re: Orthodics - fitting them to a shoe

Richard, C.Ped on 8/17/04 at 13:27 (158260)

If the shelf area bothers you, find someone with a Dremmel tool to grind a slight angle.

Re: Orthodics - fitting them to a shoe

Nick, C.Ped on 8/17/04 at 22:55 (158295)

Richard,
I just had a Client of mine who moved a million miles away, She called today with a simple problem and I swear i just qouted exactly what you said...made me laugh thats all...she called it 'backyard pedorthics'

-Nick

Re: Orthodics - fitting them to a shoe

Richard, C.Ped on 8/18/04 at 08:14 (158312)

haha......Board Certified shade tree pedorthics...lol

Hey...you gotta do what you gotta do. If I am at someones home and do not have my shoe stretching tool, I improvise with a hair dryer and golf balls.