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are there two different kinds of iontopheresis?

Posted by mike10570 on 8/18/04 at 13:16 (158347)

I went to a physical therapist a year ago. Iontopheresis was applied to treat my plantar problem. Two electro pads were sticked to my foot and then current was applied for about 20 minutes. I was told this would force steroid ions to penetrate into the hot spot. The two pads were removed and discarded.

Today I went to the other physical therapist. She told me she would use iontopheresis for my elbow pain. Then she sticked two paper (or plastic) pads on my elbow and told me to keep them stay there for 24 hours. But no electric current was applied.

Are there two different kinds of iontopheresis? Does any one have similar experience? I wonder how the second method works? Which is more effective?

Re: are there two different kinds of iontopheresis?

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/18/04 at 19:39 (158365)

mike:
There are different machines out there and different electrodes (pads) but not really different kinds of iontophoresis. Another thing that can vary is the content of the fluid used in ionophoresis.
Ed

Re: are there two different kinds of iontopheresis?

mike10570 on 8/19/04 at 11:21 (158413)

Thank you very much, Ed. For my curiosity and education, what kind of fluid is used most often for controlling inflammation? Is fluid applied to the negative or positive electrode?

Re: are there two different kinds of iontopheresis?

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/20/04 at 22:47 (158489)

mike:
Here is a link that explains the process more completely. All ions have a positive or negative charge. Like repels like so the positive electode would be attached to a pad containing a positively charged ion and a negative pad attached to a pad with a negatively charged one.

http://www.ncstatecollege.edu/webpub/jhull/pta112sp00/iontophoresis.htm

Some of the more common fluids used include lidocaine, a local anesthetic and dexamethasone phosphate, a soluble steroid (form of 'cortisone'). The two may be mixed on the electrode. I will have to look it up but beleive that these two substances in particular would be repelled (driven into the skin) via the negative electrode.
Ed

Re: correction

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/20/04 at 22:51 (158490)

Lidocaine is positively charged so one would use the positive electrode for that in particular.
Ed

Re: correction

mike10570 on 8/22/04 at 20:21 (158556)

Ed, Thank you very much for the information. -Mike