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New Document on Tape

Posted by Scott R - moderator on 2/25/05 at 10:27 (169869)

I wrote a new document on how to tape for plantar fasciitis. Please review and give me your feedback.

http://heelspurs.com/ tape.html

It's meant to print out on just one page for easy distribution. We're placing it in every order that goes out. On the reverse side is our 'mini-catalog' of products.

I've been testing magnets on friends and family. They really seem to work, so i did an order page:

https://helius.safe-order.net/cgi-heelspurs/a/b.cgi?p=mag

Re: New Document on Tape

elliott on 2/25/05 at 10:50 (169872)

Scott:

Was the magnet testing a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of sufficient sample size? :-)

I must confess to having purchased some time ago a set of magnets of the utmost quality (and price to match :-)) for my problems (not PF, though). I also admit to feeling a little better, or thinking I did, in the short term. But a couple months later, I realized I was no better at all.

elliott

Re: New Document on Tape

Julie on 2/25/05 at 11:54 (169876)

Scott

The tape page should be very useful. The illustration is good, and I think it's less confusing to show just one technique. People can always go to the detailed explanation in the book if they need to.

I have a couple of comments.

The problem most people have at first is getting the tension right. It would help to say that a few tries may be needed: that if the tape is too loose it won't be effective, too tight and it will hurt. Start by holding the foot in a gently dorsiflexed position. To make the tape looser, dorsiflex the foot more, to make it tighter, dorsiflex it less.

You might want to give some guidance on removing the sticky residue (unless the tape you sell doesn't leave residue!) I think there are sprays to apply before applying the tape that make it easier. I didn't try them, and found that lighter fluid worked best.

A reminder not to get the tape wet would be useful.
.

Re: New Document on Tape

Dorothy on 2/25/05 at 14:45 (169896)

The illustrations are a vast improvement. A little language clarity might be useful: the comment about Maalox, for example - how are you/someone suggesting that it be used? Since I think Maalox is usually ingested, you might clarify what you mean; is this to be used as a lotion? Is the hairspray sprayed on the skin of the foot? When?
What about the use of 'pre- tape'?? How should that be used??

That's all that comes to mind right off the top - but, again, the illustrations are good. Julie's suggestions about tension are important, too.

Re: New Document on Tape

Dorothy on 2/25/05 at 14:48 (169897)

I just took another look and I would say this also: an explanation of WHY tape, what is the reasoning, the purpose? What is it supposed to do? Is it support? Is it supplanting the function of something? How should it feel if it is doing what it is supposed to do? Does tape have the same function as an orthotic?
Questions and answers like those.....

Re: New Document on Tape

Julie on 2/25/05 at 16:45 (169907)

Dorothy, as it's a single-page document, I guess Scott is trying to be as brief as possible. But I think this is the answer to your 'why' question:

'Tension in the plantar fascia is reduced by transferring the tension to the tape.'

That really says what needs to be said, I think.
.

Re: New Document on Tape

Scott R on 2/25/05 at 16:45 (169908)

Thanks for the feedback. It has to fit on one page, so I'll have to make the pictures smaller to add more text.

Dorothy, what do you mean by the following questions?

'an explanation of WHY tape, what is the reasoning, the purpose? What is it supposed to do?'

I thought 4 sentences explicitly explaining the answers to those questions was enough.

Re: magnets

Scott R on 2/25/05 at 17:19 (169916)

I bet the difference between my $4 magnets and your expensive magnets is that if you get mine near a computer or TV screen (CRT) then it will damage the coloring. Bringing a stack near a single one laying on the floor results in the single one slamming so hard against the stack that i either get a painful pinch to the finger or a busted magnet. Look at the pic below. I bet a stack of the expensive magnets can't do that.

http://heelspurs.com/a/mag/mag_weight2.jpg

For a long time i have considered doing a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study on magnets through the web site. I can do a matrix of smaller magnets that can cancel or increase the magnetic field. At the unvieling of the blind, customers who got the sham would be sent the proper ones. Customers would have to report their results in order to know if they got the sham.

Re: New Document on Tape

Dorothy on 2/25/05 at 18:38 (169919)

I reviewed your page again and see these two statements:

Athletic tape reduces the tension when walking, standing, and stretching the calf muscles.
Tension in the plantar fascia is reduced by transferring the tension to the tape.

They seem to be two versions of the same thing. I must have missed something, as you say there are four explicit statements. However, even at the one or two that I do see, I would say this: if I were a brand new reader wanting to find out about taping and wanting to understand the rationale behind it, the illustrations show the procedure nicely, but the text doesn't give much explanation as to the why one would tape one's feet (i.e. what does that mean 'reduces the tension when walking...'?)
and/or how tape 'reduces tension'. I think that orthotics are fairly easy to understand: they give support = they hold up the foot where it needs that extra holding up. Tape is not as clearly understood. I'm not alone in this; I've often read other posters' questioning statements, not understanding the rationale behind taping. I mean, is taping like an orthotic? Is it like padding? Is it supposed to prevent the foot tissues from moving? If your intention is to show taping to someone who already has a grasp of the concept and the process (such as Julie), then you hardly need any information at all - and why would you want to instruct someone who already knows how and why to do it. However, if your intention is to instruct someone who doesn't know about it, then instruct and inform them. That's all I'm suggesting. However, if you and others already feel that you have done that adequately, then I'm not arguing. You asked for feedback and I gave mine. I didn't give my feedback for my feedback to be judged. Please consider it relevant or discard it or whatever you want. I think the illustrations are great and I think the idea for improving the taping information is great. Many have asked for that, including me. Top-notch taping information and instruction is not readily available on the internet; I have looked, so there is a need for what you are doing. Good luck with this!

Re: New Document on Tape

Julie on 2/26/05 at 02:49 (169933)

Scott, I can see what Dorothy means. The explanation in the first four sentences makes sense to me, but then I understand what the function of the fascia is, taped regularly for a year, and thought about it a lot in my attempts to help people who were at sea with it. I think it would be useful to augment the wording so that it 'speaks' to folks who have no experience of it.

Perhaps you could say, after 'Tension in the plantar fascia is reduced by transferring the tension to the tape' -

' Taping supports the arch, which the inflamed fascia can no longer do.'
.

Re: Second thought

Julie on 2/26/05 at 03:36 (169935)

Scott, this is what I think you could helpfully say:

'Tension in the plantar fascia is reduced by transferring the tension to the tape. The tape takes over the job of supporting the arch, which the inflamed fascia can no longer do. Taping therefore 'rests' the fascia, and contributes to healing, as well as relieving pain.'

If you have room for it, I think this would give people who are new to PF, and new to the site, and have never heard of taping, a better idea of why they should try it.
.

Re: Question re: new taping method

Robin P on 2/26/05 at 14:01 (169952)

The new taping document states : 'The tape should not come up on the back of the heel because the skin needs to stretch there when walking.'

This represents a major departure from the taping method described in 'The Book', which shows photos of the tape clearly around the back of the heel. Moreover, 'The Book' states: 'Bending the foot back (dorsiflexion) when placing tape on the back of the heel helps because it prevents the skin from getting pulled when walking. The skin on the back of the heel will try to stretch when walking and bending the foot back before taping will cause the skin to give itself some slack ahead of time.'

For the past 6 months I have been taping my foot each morning exactly as described in 'The Book', taking care to bend my foot back as I place the tape on the back of my heel. I believe that this taping method has helped a great deal. I was surprised that the new taping document seems to prohibit taping around the back of the heel. I tried the new taping method this morning, stopping the tape on the bottom of my foot...it doesn't seem to provide as much support to my arch as the original taping method did.

I guess my question is: Can I stick with the orginal taping method, as long as I'm sure to bend my foot back as I apply the tape around my heel?

Re: New Document on Tape

Scott R on 2/26/05 at 18:33 (169979)

The first sentence

'Too much tension in the plantar fascia can cause heel pain, heel spurs, and pain in the bottom of the foot. '

is one of the 4 sentences and explains 'why', along with sentence two that you quoted above.

The 4th sentence is part of explaining how: 'The tape has to stick for it work because tension is being transferred through the skin.'

So i have two sentences for 'why' and two for 'how'

I see what you're saying and the only thing i can add is:

'The tape is connected in a way that is similar to the plantar fascia; they're both connected to the front of the foot and to the heel. But the tape is shorter during weight bearing than the plantar fascia so the tape experiences a lot of tension which prevents the plantar fascia from being stretched.'

But it needs to be shorter.

Re: Second thought

Scott R on 2/26/05 at 18:37 (169980)

Thanks Julie, but i think the post i just made should 'hit the nail on the head' better for Dorothy. She really wanted to know a deeper 'how' than i originally explained. The problem is figuring out how to work it in (shorten it)

Re: Question re: new taping method

Scott R on 2/26/05 at 18:58 (169982)

Hi Robin,
First let me say thanks for reading the book so carefully. You are absolutely right. I departed from what's in the book in order to simplify my comments. The two different methods are essentially the same, but the method you're following could be better if it doesn't hurt the skin on the back of the heel. It's possibly better because it provides a larger area for the tape to stick and remain in place. But for the new document, i wanted to make it as simple as possible.

If what you're doing doesn't hurt and it helps, then keep doing it.

Thanks Julie, Dorothy, and Robin. I'll make the pictures a little smaller to include all the comments but still keep it printable on 1 page with 1' margins. It's now going out in every order on the back-side of my 1-page 'catalog'.

The next thing on my 'web site improvement' list is a patient 'history, symptoms, and treatments-tried' form for patients to fill out, print, and take to their next doctor appointment. It also has to fit on one page.

Re: New Document on Tape

Julie on 2/27/05 at 02:40 (170006)

Scott, that's a great engineer's explanation how taping works.

What I think potential tapers really want to know (bottom line) is what benefits they might experience from taping, i.e.

Taping 'rests' the fascia, contributing to healing as well as relieving pain.
.

Re: New Document on Tape

Suzanne D. on 2/27/05 at 07:10 (170012)

Would this help, ScottR?

What you want to say:

'Too much tension in the plantar fascia can cause heel pain, heel spurs, and pain in the bottom of the foot. Athletic tape reduces the tension when walking, standing, and stretching the calf muscles. Tension in the plantar fascia is reduced by transferring the tension to the tape. The tape has to stick for it work because tension is being transferred through the skin. The tape is connected in a way that is similar to the plantar fascia; they're both connected to the front of the foot and to the heel. But the tape is shorter during weight bearing than the plantar fascia so the tape experiences a lot of tension which prevents the plantar fascia from being stretched.'
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Shorter version:

Too much tension in the plantar fascia can cause heel pain, heel spurs, and pain in the bottom of the foot. Athletic tape, applied properly from the front of the foot to the heel, can reduce this tension, thereby reducing pain. Tape reduces tension on the fascia by keeping the fascia from stretching as far during walking, standing, and other movement.

Suzanne :)

Re: Magnets

Kathy G on 2/27/05 at 09:29 (170019)

It would be interesting to see a conrolled study on the efficacy of magnets, as you say, Scott. All they did for me was make me uncomfortably warm. But I just read an article somewhere - I have to think where it was so it may take a while - and it mentioned magnet therapy for PF. Maybe Readers Digest? I'll think of it.

Anyway, I think it's smart to offer them because they just might work for some people.

Re: magnets

elliott on 2/27/05 at 10:01 (170021)

Scottr

Your magnet pic don't impress me none: everyone knows that when it comes to magnets, low-energy is better than high-energy. :-) Actually, if you believe in them, there are more factors than just strength: bipolar vs unipolar, positive vs negative (also called north vs south), etc. In order to work, they have to be the right kind. ('Which kind is that, Chief?' :-))

Not that I'm vouching for the content, but here's a somewhat interesting link on magnet basics for medicinal purposes, including some published studies and a description of which kinds work for what.

http://www.phtmontana.com/magnet_bio.htm

Mine, which actually come with a warning to keep away from electronic equipment too, are discs of I believe 2450 gauss, south polarization, and are somewhat bendable to conform against the skin and have velcro on the other side to stick to your sock. I'm glad I got these somewhat more expensive magnets so I don't have to wonder whether magnets would have worked had I tried them. I actually feel a little better while wearing them. My own theory is that the feeling of the magnetic field acts somewhat like a TENS unit, distracting you from the pain.

Scottr, can I make a request? A lot of us talk about yoga for, say, life enhancement or the back, which has little to do with Julie's foot-specific PF exercises. Is it possible to change the automatically produced link to yoga from 'yoga' to something like 'foot yoga'? Thanks.

elliott

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Re: Yoga

Julie on 2/27/05 at 11:46 (170032)

How about 'yoga for pf'?
.

Re: magnets and yoga

Scott R on 2/27/05 at 13:16 (170043)

Julie, do you have a phrase more specific than yoga for me?

Elliott, i don't know what this 'unipolar' business is, but all magnets are bipolar. All have a north and south pole. Which pole is pointing to the skin is also meaningless. Cells don't know up from down and a north pole applied to one side is the same as the south pole applied to the other side. How could a cell care which 'side' it's being applied to? Gauss is a measure of the magnetic field, but it's meaningless without knowing the distance from the magnetic at which it was measured. If it's measured at the surface, then you still don't know what it is 1 inch into the skin because it depends on the geometry of the magnetic.

Re: Scott

Julie on 2/27/05 at 14:00 (170044)

What I think is that we should have a single post containing instructions for the yoga foot exercises and the plantar fascia stretch. with a single link to it. The link phrase could be 'Non-weightbearing exercises for PF'. It could include a mention of and link to Mike Wilmot's foot trainer website.

If you like, I will rewrite the whole thing and we can start again. You can ditch the two posts and the two links, and we'll have just one set of instructions with one link.

Let me know, and I'll do it and post it
.

Re: magnetic inserts

Scott R on 2/27/05 at 14:03 (170045)

Rotating one of these magnets affects my computer screen from 1 foot away. If i arrange 4 to cover the size of my heel, and i rotate the 4 together, it changes the color of my computer screen from 2 feet away. A simple stack of ten (the number you might use in an insert) affects the computer screen from 3 feet away. You can't make an insert out of these because their attraction for each other would collapse the material unless they are embedded in hard rubber or wood. Big refrigerator magnets don't affect my monitor at all, and most magnetic insoles I've seen aren't strong enough to stick to a refrigerator.

Re: Scott

Dorothy on 2/27/05 at 14:18 (170046)

Julie -

This is a good organizational idea on its own, but it would then also allow for any possible future additions of exercises of this type that are deemed good ones.

I'm not scottr, but I like your idea. :-)

Re: Scott

Scott R on 2/27/05 at 14:20 (170047)

Julie, yes, go ahead and splice the two posts and give me the phrases you want to become active links. ''Non-weightbearing exercises for PF' seems too long to remember and too long to type.

Re: ScottR

Julie on 2/28/05 at 04:53 (170111)

Scott, I'll do this today.

Is it still possible to correct a post after it is made? I'd like to be able to do this once I can see it as a post. It's long, and I'm bound to leave unnoticed typos.

I'm havng problems with my email programme (it won't send any more) so please respond on the board.
.

Re: ScottR

Scott R on 2/28/05 at 08:43 (170122)

Julie, you have to do
and to end bold, italics, etc.

Re: New Document on Tape

Scott R on 3/01/05 at 16:25 (170225)

Thanks Suzanne, that's exactly what i was looking for

Re: ScottR

Julie on 3/01/05 at 16:46 (170228)

I know, and I'm sorry. I know how to do it, but forgot that time.

Sackcloth and ashes. I won't do it again.
.

Re: ScottR

Scott R on 3/01/05 at 17:45 (170235)

oops, i meant you have to do </b> and </i> to end the bold and italics.

Re: ScottR

Julie on 3/02/05 at 02:28 (170254)

I know.

Re: New Document on Tape

john k on 3/11/05 at 04:53 (170927)

That shorter explanation makes perfect sense to me.

When I taped myself up, the first thing I noticed was that I could balance, because, clearly, the PF wasn't getting stretched to the limit. There was pain there, but it wasn't the sharp pain I'd felt without the tape. The tape prevented that muscle from being stretched to the point where the pain can't be endured. It was like a little 'booster' for the injured muscle.

My mind was blown!

I just experienced the pain yesterday, and I'm going to go to the docs soon. I caused it by walking with a gouty foot, causing me to 'walk funny'. Odds are, that cause PF. This PF condition is almost as bad as gout!

Re: magnets and yoga

B.Bellingham on 3/19/05 at 18:42 (171596)

But, do magnets work??

Re: magnets and yoga

john h on 3/25/05 at 09:29 (171943)

Not for me they did not. All I have read on the subject say no way.