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What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Posted by elliott on 3/03/05 at 14:39 (170374)

Please offer your thoughts after reading the following, including all links.

We see a lot of neuroma surgery failures come to these boards, making one wonder what the true success rate (supposedly very high) really is, or perhaps whether this board is prone to draw in failures, skewing our perception. My impression is that the podiatrists here seem to think it's at least 95%, maybe even more like 99%. Not long ago I spoke to a recently retired podiatrist who is an acquaintance of mine and he claims, similarly, that in his thirty years of practice he had only one neuroma case that wasn't completely resolved by surgery, and even then he believes even that one worked out after forwarding the patient to a bigtime surgeon for a re-do.

In the orthopedic literature, success rates seem to be more like only 80-85%. (BTW, what is the definition of success?) Revision surgery and its potential pitfalls are a hot topic nowadays. Upon reading the literature, one also gets the impression that the basic surgery itself is far from standardized, e.g., as to location of incision, what to do with that ligament thingy, where to bury the stump, etc.

Anyway, I offer several sources on success rates. Here's one, by the legendary Baxter,

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=8734796

where he claims that simultaneous adjacent interdigital excision has the same success rate as for a single neuroma (this is of some interest to me since I just had a nonsimultaneous adjacent interdigital excision).

Success rates of any sort weren't obvious to these researchers:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15266472

Do you find the following results reaassuring?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14600717

Check out these results, also lower (and they also claim that success is less likely the *smaller* the neuroma is, contrary to a claim made on these boards recently):

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=10509684

A year or so ago, as an enticement to subscribe, Foot an Ankle Clinics, a premier orthopedic journal, gave the public access to several years' articles online, including the current year at the time. That generosity has now ended, but I printed everything in sight of interest to me, including an article on neuromas from the March 03 issue. Here's the abstract:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12760574

It claims the failure rate is '15-20%, even in the best of series.' The link appearing at the bottom of my hard copy of the full article still works! Hope it works for you too. Here it is; enjoy!

http://www.foot.theclinics.com/article/PIIS1083751503000044/fulltext

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Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Darlene on 3/03/05 at 16:29 (170376)

Elliott:

Thank you for sharing this.

It is very interesting. I wonder why they found the larger the neuroma, the better the result.
One study said the results were the same as decompression surgery, but I would really question that.
The OS who did my excision said that he would not do both interspaces at once due to the amount of numbness it would create. Fix one and the other pain may resolve on its own.
It seems that there is so much guessing with foot problems.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Ralph on 3/03/05 at 17:24 (170382)

I too thank you for your post. I never knew neruoma surgery was so involved or could be so involved. My own conclusion when it comes to success rate for any surgery is that doctors seem to give out a success number to their patients and whether it matches with any articles in print or matches their own success it doesn't seem to matter. Its just a number thrown tossed out there. Please remember this is just my own feeling about success rates.

Since we all heal differently and since everyone can have a different meaning for the words 'successful outcome' I think its very objective.
I guess you find the best doctor you can, one that has had the most experience doing the surgery required and take your chances. If you hit the targeted number you call the surgery a success.

My way of thinking is the best success rate is always found by avoiding surgery if at all possible.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

elliott on 3/03/05 at 21:25 (170397)

Darlene:

I would guess the larger the neuroma the better the result is because if there's a large mass removed, the chances for noticeable pain relief are better since more pressure is relieved; if it's small so not that much is coming out anyway, then maybe the trauma of the whole procedure, scar tissue, etc., leaves little net change in the after vs. before. It could still be true that if the neuroma is way big, then there are other risks or possible negative outcomes, so maybe that's still true too. The 5 mm they quote as the cutoff sounds small to me; I think each of the three dimensions (l x w x h?) of the two neuromas, one in each foot, appearing on my diagnostic ultrasound were larger than that.

Regarding doing two at once, I had I believe 12 nerve blocks (10 lidocaine/marcain, two cortisone) over a two-year period into the third (Morton's) interspace and one into the second in an attempt to be sure where the neuroma was and also possibly avoid surgery. The ultrasound (which my OS didn't have that much faith in as others do) picked up only the second interspace in each foot, and at the time I barely felt anything in the other foot so that it was thought to be inconclusive. I had the surgery in the Morton's space and had tremendous relief, so I am sure that neuroma was there too. But then I still had pain remaining in the other interspace, so that was done along with other surgical procedures this time around. Had I known conclusively from the start, I'm sure I would have had them done at the same time. I think I get some permanent numbness after each surgery (I don't feel it when walking but it feels substantial when I massage the sole of my foot with my hand or rub it against the wall or floor), but I find this acceptable because I got tremendous relief. (Still a little too early with my second one since I have yet to weightbear or wear shoes following this second surgery, but the lump I felt and was observed at surgery seems gone.) I want to not feel pain and be able to keep my shoes on. I believe that the amount of numbness felt varies from person to person even for the same procedure. My OS was very experienced in such surgeries. Some of the pods here seem to think that noticeable numbness is rare and shouldn't happen. Is anything ever straight with neuromas?

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Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

elliott on 3/03/05 at 21:32 (170398)

Ralph,

Agree that success rates are often very subjective (I think you meant sub not ob too). If you think neuroma surgery is involved, read about the choices, techniques, and complications for revisions; it's wild.

I used to think that avoiding surgery is best, but when you suffer for five years or so without resolution, you wonder if you suffered needlessly for so long, especially when the success rates for such a surgery are so high (or are they? :-)).

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Mike C on 3/03/05 at 21:56 (170399)

A different perspective. Tight calf muscles decrease ankle range of motion. This can cause plantar fasciitis, as I have tried to point out. However, tight calves can also result in overload of the forefoot. The MTP joint of the 2nd and third toes are rigidly fixed at the TMT level. These MTP joint are susceptable to imflammation and can become quite painful. One can experience neuritic-like pain but, this appears to be more of a function of the position of the digital nerves to these inflammed joints.
I have seen, literally hundreds of patients referred with a diagnosis of 'interdigital neuroma' and a hundred or so more with a 'recurrent neuroma' after having had surgery. On exam all but two demonstrated joint pain treated successfully with calf stretching and metatarsal pads.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

elliott on 3/04/05 at 07:36 (170413)

Mike C, a tight calf being the culprit is an interesting perspective, and maybe that explains some failures. In my own case, it was caused by a tight cast from a previous surgery. I otherwise am very flexible, in my calves and elsewhere.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Dr. Wishnie on 3/04/05 at 15:08 (170454)

Even though the success rate is high there probably is no need to remove neuromas anyway. We do not remove any other type of nerve except for interdigital neuromas. With a combo of orthoses, injections (alcohol or steroids), cryotherapy and/or intermetatarsal decompression we do not need to remove the neuroma. There are less complications and the patient can get back to reg. activities faster than performing the surgery.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Ralph on 3/04/05 at 17:32 (170469)

What is intermetatarsal decompression?

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Mike C on 3/04/05 at 19:37 (170476)

I appreciate your perspective Dr. Wishnie but, there are a lot of individuals making a great deal of money doing it.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Mike C on 3/04/05 at 19:39 (170477)

That consists of cutting the intermetatarsal ligament. Another procedure being done on a regular basis by people who have no appreciation for biomechanics of the foot.

Re: To Mike C

Darlene on 3/05/05 at 14:18 (170527)

Would you kindly expand on the biomechanical implication of neuroma nerve decompression.
I had my ligament cut and it totally changed my biomechanics - 2 dropped met heads as a result, altered gait putting pressure on the posterior tibial nerve etc. I asked the pod specifically about hypermobile joints before I had the surgery and he said it was a non issue -- wrong!

Thank you.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Ralph on 3/05/05 at 16:13 (170533)

If intermetatarsal decompression is cutting a ligament isn't that considered surgery? What is worse cutting the ligament or cutting out the neuroma and why?

Mike I think you said you were a doctor. There are a lot of posts about surgical intervention on this site for P.F. Neuromas, and Tarsal Tunnel, but many of them have turned out poorly.

I've gotten the impression that many doctors offer surgery and patients take it lightly like it's no big deal and so do their doctors, that is until some continue to have pain or develop new problems which strangely arise after their surgery.

Could you comment on foot surgery in general, it's difficulties, and when it should be considered an option for a patient.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

elliott on 3/06/05 at 15:36 (170576)

OK, I did a web search on alcohol sclerosing injections (asi). Here's what I dug up:

Here's a nice summary of the two initial, very promising studies on alcohol sclerosing injections:

http://www.regence.com/trgmedpol/medicine/med113.html

Here's another one, recent, also with good results. They seem to give 30% alcohol, the other studies 4%:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14531002

According to this one, sclerosing injections are hopelessly out of date. :-) Cryosurgery is where it's at! (OTOH, acknowledges symptoms can return.) Makes it sound like asi are more dangerous than acknowledged, and that in actuality they burn through everything skin, tendons nerves, leaving muck in place of what used to be an intermetatarsal space. As with anything new, things are still unclear as to the long term:

http://www.podiatrytoday.com/podtd/displayArticleaa.cfm?articleID=article2691

As with anything, the doc better know what he's doing:

http://www.arch-pain.com/Questions/00000ceb.htm

Fascinating discussion among DPMs regarding asi efficacy:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0LMB/is_1_22/ai_97251125

So is there a clear bottom line, a best protocol of what to do first?

elliott

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Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Darlene on 3/06/05 at 16:06 (170579)

Elliott:

The study using the 30% alcohol also used an ultrasound to guide the needle. That should up the success rate. It seems that most injections are done 'blind.'

Bottom line - there is no easy answer to neuromas.

Darlene

Re: To Mike C

Mike C on 3/07/05 at 17:34 (170644)

The intermetatarsal ligament is a band of tissue connecting the metatarsals to one another. This helps maintain the position of each metatarsal to one another. If this is cut there is dissociation and the metatarsals can splay or spread under weight bearing forces disrupting the forefoot as a unit. This can also can deformities of the toes as the pedistal becomes unstable under the toe as it is being pulled on by tendons from various directions.

Re: To Mike C

Ralph on 3/07/05 at 17:53 (170647)

After hearing this explaination, who would want a doctor to do this to their foot? This sounds like a really bad idea.

The more I read about the various surgical treatments the more I don't want anyone cutting my feet.

I asked the question which is worse surgical treatment for treating a neruoma the decompression of the metatarsal ligament or cutting the nerve and my conclusion is both are not good choices but that's just my conclusion. Others can do what they want.

I don't have a neruoma, but I never want my metatarsal ligament cut. Who comes up with these surgical cures anyway??? They sure don't sound much like cures to me.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Mike C on 3/07/05 at 18:46 (170649)

Ralph,
Surgery should be considered when conservative measures fail to restore the desired quality of life. There are inherent risks under the best of circumstances and no such thing a benign surgery concerning the foot & ankle. This is where the rubber meets the road. The foot sees up to 6 times your body weight. If surgery is going to be done there are a couple axioms that reign. The surgeon must understand the problem completely. The problem must be amenable to surgery-not all are. The surgeon must also understand the biomechanics of the proposed procedure-simply stated, what happens on one side of the foot may affect the other side. The procedure should make sense both biologically and biomechanically. The surgeon must be aware of possible complications and be prepared to deal with them. I have seen too many surgeons who did not recognize problems in the OR the correction of which would have been the difference between the desired result or not. If a surgeon does not understand why a post op problem arose, there is a lack of understanding and he/she should not be doing surgery.
I admit foot surgery has a gotten a bad rap. Unfortunately, there are many people doing it who don't have adequate training or understanding of the problems and techniques.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Mike C on 3/07/05 at 18:48 (170650)

If one addresses the cause of the problem there is no reason to destroy a nerve.

Re: To Mike C

Mike C on 3/07/05 at 20:36 (170663)

Again it is a matter of correct diagnosis. In 7 years and over 300 patients referred with a diagnosis of neuroma on 2 acturally had one. Yet, I was at a hospital where neurectomies or decompressions were being done 3 to 4 times per week.
Most, and I do mean most, patients have swelling and irritation to the metatarsophalangeal joints - very commonly mistaken and diagnosed as a neuroma.

Re: Mike

Julie on 3/08/05 at 01:49 (170672)

So much foot surgery seems to be a case of 'robbing Peter to pay Paul' (as you've just said, Mike, to the person who asked about SPLATT surgery) rather than of restoring function. It's hard to believe - or would be if we were not reading here daily about the unfortunate results - that surgery is so often performed with so little understanding of the complete, complex structure of the foot.

Cutting here to relieve tension or pressure there, without considering all the possible results and potential hazards seems unwise, to say the least. Thank you for this cogent explanation.
.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/08/05 at 11:49 (170691)

Good point. I have treated a few plantar flexed metatarsal bone that had ligaments cut to decompress nerves ( neuroma's

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

elliott on 3/08/05 at 12:36 (170699)

Mike C, I see you have some strong convictions concerning the appropriateness of neuroma surgery. I don't deny that a decision as to surgery should be thought through and the surgeon chosen carefully, but I wonder whether this discussion is getting oversimplified somewhat. Some points:

Many going into surgery have an identifiable mass pressing in there, giving them obvious nerve discomfort.

It is accepted in the literature that many, especially women, get neuromas from too-tight shoes. I don't see why that should be so rare an occurrence (did you ever see those shoes?!).

Based on the literature, how to handle even a bona fide neuroma is quite murky. Some might claim that, at least in some cases, it is the intermetatarsal ligament that is pressing on the nerve, and failure to release it may be a cause of surgical failure.

Often a nerve is so inflamed that it must be removed. Failure to do so may be a cause for surgical failure. The slight sensory loss resulting may be far preferable to the initial pain.

Some very prominent docs have written about neuromas and they seem to be doing things you frown on. I'm just not sure the picture is so clear.

elliott

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Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Ralph on 3/08/05 at 20:46 (170753)

What did you do to correct the situation for patients that had this decompression surgery Dr. Z? Can you reconnect the ligaments? What helps these people?

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Mike on 3/09/05 at 08:10 (170779)

I am not saying neuromas don't exist. What I am saying is; they are not near as frequent as thought. If one actually has a painful mass - great excise it. But, I have seen countless patients who have been referred because their 'neuroma' came back. Upon exam, I compress the metatarsophalangeal joint and recreate their complaint. That is synovitis of the joint, not a neuroma. As I have said; I have treated hundreds of patients that had been diagnosed with a neuroma that had 100% relief with calf stretching and metatarsal pads.
The truth of the matter is if you complain of forefoot pain localizing to the MTP region and the pain is recreated with dorsiflexion of the digits and medial/lateral compression you will be told you have a neuroma. These diagnostic maneuvers will also cause pain in cases of MTP joint synovitis. The difference is that compressing the mtp joint from top and bottom will also cause pain in the case of synovitis but, not with a neuroma.
Unfortunately, Elliot, just because someone writes a chapter in a text book doesn't mean correct.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Mike C on 3/09/05 at 15:21 (170809)

Elliot, if you read Karole above this is a perfect example of why foot surgery has a bad track record. Indiviuals doing surgery without thought to biology, bimechanics or rationale thought. Heel spurs in themselves are not painful, removing scar tissue begets more scar, cutting nerves can cause neuromas and the plantar fascia is a necessary structure.

Re: To Mike C

Dr. Z on 3/09/05 at 19:35 (170837)

Mike,
The most important aspect when treating a neuroma is take a look at the patients shoes. Metatarsal padding is another simple yet very effective treatment.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Dr. Z on 3/09/05 at 19:38 (170838)

I have done in very select cases where a corn has formed under the dropped metatarsal a procedure called a metatarsal osteotomy. Must be in very selective cases due to the tranfer of pain to another metatarsal. bone. This is a very effective corrective procedure in the properly selected patient Other treatments non surgical are padding, orthosis. Wedges on the outside of the shoe

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Ralph on 3/09/05 at 22:34 (170848)

When I hear the word 'osteotomy' I think of part of the intestine is being cut out or shortened.

When you use this term does it refer to the same thing shortening something? If so what are you shortening and why does it help? I still don't understand why a person would have these ligaments cut to treat a neuroma.

I just can't imagine have all those support points cut. What is left to keep bones in line?

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Julie on 3/10/05 at 00:50 (170852)

Ralph, I think you're thinking of 'colostomy'.

'Osteo' means bone, and 'otomy' means cutting. Osteotomy means cutting of bone (anywhere in the body, in this case the metatarsal).
.

Re: To Mike C

Mike C on 3/10/05 at 21:22 (170918)

That is true in the extremly rare case that it is a neuroma. Lucky for most the same treatment will help with MTP synovitis.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

elliott on 3/15/05 at 13:51 (171241)

Mike C,

I spoke to the orthopedist who did my neuroma surgeries. He specializes in nerves. Well, guess what? He cuts out the nerve and releases the intermetatarsal ligament. He claims if you don't cut out the nerve, the failure rate goes way up; one of his colleagues, a very prominent orthopedist, did just such a study and that was the result. And he said I should indeed have a bit of sensory loss or else it is a sign the surgery might fail. He also claims the support structure around the ligament will re-grow. You have your strong views, but I would say he knows what he's doing. So far, I am very happy with the results. Maybe technique matters a lot too.

Re: Question for Elliott

Darlene on 3/15/05 at 17:42 (171258)

This is for elliott or anyone else who has had a neurectomy.
I am 2 months out from my surgery. If I press on the arch of my foot right where the cut end of the nerve would be, I get weird sensation in my 3rd and 4th toes. It happens whether I am closer to the ball or back towards the heel, but along the course of that nerve. It isn't exactly pain, but almost. The entire nerve along the arch is super sensitive.

Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

Darlene

Re: Question for Elliott

elliott on 3/16/05 at 08:39 (171288)

Darlene,

What you describe seems to sound more like TTS, or more specifically, entrapment of the lateral plantar nerve, than a neurectomy. I'm not sure what you mean by pressing on the arch where the cut end of the nerve would be--the cut end is in the ball area, not the arch. It is not uncommon for sensations of some sort or the other for a while post-surgery, but it's hard to tell if what you're describing is normal. Recommend making an appt with another doc who knows nerves well and cancelling if you get better while waiting the month or so for the appt date to come.

Re: Question for Elliott

Darlene on 3/16/05 at 17:44 (171346)

Thank you for responding.
Here's how I understand neurectomies. Before the nerve is cut, it is pulled fairly taught so that after it is cut it springs back into the arch area. That way the 'nerve end' (literally) is away from the weight bearing trauma of the forefoot. Now that I think of it there must be 2 cuts. If you think of the neuroma as being the straight part of the letter Y, it must be cut first of all to free it from the top of the Y that goes into the 3rd and 4th toes, and then the lower end which courses to the arch. The 2 nerves at the top of the Y are still in your toes after the surgery, but I guess they aren't attached to anything.
Does this make any sense?
D.

Re: Question for Elliott

elliott on 3/17/05 at 10:06 (171392)

Darlene,

Your description may be accurate. I may be mistaken, but I don't think they are doing any cutting near the arch. I didn't feel any post-surg pain there either. I do believe it is possible for a nerve more proximally, or even elsewhere in the body, to be affected by a more distal excision (deafferentation pain?).

Are you going for another opinion? Around where do you live? Maybe I can make a recommendation.

elliott

Re: Question for Elliott

Darlene on 3/17/05 at 13:24 (171420)

I live in Canada. I had my first surgery here (decompression surgery which was a disaster and led to TTS) and then went to the U.S. for the neurectomy (foot and ankle specialist). Could I give you my e-mail address for doctor info.?

Darlene

Re: Question for Elliott

elliott on 3/17/05 at 16:32 (171440)

Darlene:

Canada. Wow. Are you willing to travel again? Yes, email address is fine.

Re: Question for Elliott

Darlene on 3/17/05 at 19:17 (171451)

Yes, I am willing to travel (except my feet aren't willing right now).
Here's my address: (email removed)

Thanks.

Darlene

Re: Question for Elliott

Ed Davis. DPM on 3/27/05 at 04:14 (172011)

Elliott:

I think that the real issue may relate to the accuracy of the diagnosis.
The fact that diagnostic ultrasound (songraphy) machines have only come into popular use in the last few years is an issue. My prediction would be if one can confirm the diagnosis of a neuroma via sonography, then removing it has a fairly high success rate. Sonography has a slight edge over MRI in that one can observe motion with sonography. Neuromas tend to pop in and out of the area between the metatarsal heads (bases of the toes). The other advantage of most ultrasound machines is that one can determine the SIZE of the lesion. Sclerosing injections seem to work better when the neuroma is relatively modest in size. Each injection will cause some size reduction and the question is how many shots does one want to consider? Additionally, I would pose the question as to what is more painful, mulitple shots or one episode of excision? Which is more definitive? Practitioners, in the Seattle area deliver from 3 to 7 sclerosing injections. If one feels good with 3 sclerosing injections, then the injections may have been the better way but if it takes more than 3, then I wuld question whether the surgical option is more advantageous. That may bet true from a financial aspect too.

If one has neuroma like symptoms in between the bases of multiple toes the general rule is to suspect a more proximal lesion, eg. tarsal tunnel syndrome. Keep in mind that the plantar intermetatrsal nerves are end branches of the posterior tibial nerve, the nerve involves in TTS. If a mass compressing the posterior tibial nerve is suspected, it will usually show up on sonography (sonography is about 1/8 to 1/10 the price of MRI and is available in the office).
Ed

Re: Question for Elliott

Brian C on 4/28/05 at 00:45 (173866)

Just to give a positive story. Had standard neurectomy in 1986; improved pain but still not great result. In 1996, had another neurectomy on same nerve and made it worse, so had the nerve further cut back 5 months later, and within 6 weeks it felt excellent, and 9 years later, it still feels absolutely outstanding.

There's a lot of good information on this site, and before any surgery, people need to be very careful to exhaust all other options as this site well outlines. However, realize that this site is skewed towards people who have had bad outcomes with surgery, as the numerous people who have had good outcomes from surgery don't visit this site because they have moved on with their lives. Keep that in mind, too.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Bev C on 10/31/05 at 10:01 (186280)

I had surgery almost six weeks ago and I'm still having pain. I was told my body was having a reaction to the internal sutures. I need someone I can talk to about this ...If this is the wrong website please advise what site I can go to...I do not feel my neuroma surgery was at all a success.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Bev C on 10/31/05 at 10:22 (186282)

I had surgery almost six weeks ago and I'm still having pain. I was told my body was having a reaction to the internal sutures. I need someone I can talk to about this ...If this is the wrong website please advise what site I can go to...I do not feel my neuroma surgery was at all a success.

Re: problems with neuroma surgery

Bev C on 10/31/05 at 10:50 (186290)

I had surgery almost six weeks ago and I'm still having pain. I was told my body was having a reaction to the internal sutures. I need someone I can talk to about this ...If this is the wrong website please advise what site I can go to...I do not feel my neuroma surgery was at all a success.

Re: problems with neuroma surgery

Bev C on 10/31/05 at 10:50 (186292)

I had surgery almost six weeks ago and I'm still having pain. I was told my body was having a reaction to the internal sutures. I need someone I can talk to about this ...If this is the wrong website please advise what site I can go to...I do not feel my neuroma surgery was at all a success.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

D. on 10/31/05 at 10:50 (186295)

Hi Bev.

There is a yahoo group on morton's neuroma.

I have never heard of internal sutures for neuroma surgery. Did you have another surgery done along with your neuroma surgery?

Would you give us a little background information on your condition prior to the surgery, the type of surgery that was done, the prognosis etc.?

Thx.

D.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

Bev C on 10/31/05 at 10:50 (186298)

I had surgery almost six weeks ago and I'm still having pain. I was told my body was having a reaction to the internal sutures. I need someone I can talk to about this ...If this is the wrong website please advise what site I can go to...I do not feel my neuroma surgery was at all a success.

Re: What is the true success rate for neuroma surgery?

D. on 10/31/05 at 10:50 (186302)

Hi Bev.

There is a yahoo group on morton's neuroma.

I have never heard of internal sutures for neuroma surgery. Did you have another surgery done along with your neuroma surgery?

Would you give us a little background information on your condition prior to the surgery, the type of surgery that was done, the prognosis etc.?

Thx.

D.