Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

hips being out of balance causing PF

Posted by ginamarie on 4/15/05 at 23:05 (173286)

I have heard that the treatment for PF is having to do with the alingment of the hips does anyone have any true info on this subject??

Re: hips being out of balance causing PF

john h on 4/16/05 at 14:29 (173304)

Some of the PT treatments for PF includes a lot of balancing on one foot at a time, on soft cushions, with eyes closed (try that), on one foot while twisting to left and right, and various other positions. All this really works the intrinisic muscles in the feet and does involve hip allignment.

Re: hips being out of balance causing PF

Robert J. Sanfilippo, DC, CCSP, ART on 4/19/05 at 21:39 (173432)

Hello Ginamarie,

I was given this site by a patient of mine who is suffering from plantar fascitis. I've had very good results in the treatment of PF but this one patient has proven to be difficult and now I will be using a McConnell taping method. But to answer your question regarding hip dysfunction causing PF I believe it could be a causative factor. Hip dysfunction, usually along with Sacroiliac joint dysfunction, will cause the hamstrings to contract which will in turn cause contracture of the gastrocnemius (calf) thus causing undue tension on the achilles and then the plantar fascia. When you are diagnosed with plantar fascitis, the doctor must assess the biomechanics of the entire lower limb and pelvis. Many times the cause isn't even the plantar fascia but just a symptom caused by dysfunction somewhere else. Hope this adds clarity to your question. Hope you feel better soon.

Dr. Rob

Re: hips being out of balance causing PF

john h on 4/20/05 at 18:07 (173470)

I am currently taking PT for PF. The therapist made a good case of how the hip and hip muscles can lead to PF. Among other things she has some specific exercises I am to do to strengthen the hip and backside muscles. She showed me on an anatomy chart how this could happen but hard to put into words.

Re: hips being out of balance causing PF

Ed Davis, DPM on 4/20/05 at 23:13 (173476)

Robert:

Thanks for stopping by. Consider browsing the sight, the Heel Pain Book and answering some questions by patients. You presented a good example of how the biomechnics of the hip/hamstrings can tighten the gastrosoleus leading to plantar fascia. We need people like yourself who can explain the biomechanics as that can be difficult for patients to get a good mental picture of and understand.

Even as providers of a particular type, we can easily develop tunnel vision and miss the big picture. PF is multifactorial in etiology but the biomechanics is what gets the whole process started that cascades into plantar fasciitis.
Ed

Re: hips being out of balance causing PF

Robert J. Sanfilippo, DC, CCSP, ART on 4/21/05 at 20:18 (173515)

Hello Ed:

I'd be happy to interject my point of view and thank you for inviting me to do so. If anyone has specific questions I will do my best to answer them. Be well.

Robert

Re: hips being out of balance causing PF

Ed Davis, DPM on 4/23/05 at 00:10 (173568)

Robert:
Thank you. Please tell us more about ART, what it does, how it works, why it is effective. I had contacted the originator of the technique about a year ago but he kept his distance; perhaps feeling he would be subject to criticism or undue scrutiny. I think we are, for the most part, quite open and friendly here and curious. Occasionally you will get a heckler or two but if they persist, they usually get asked to desist or leave the board. I think that scrutiny of the investigative variety is heatlhy and exists for our inherent need to be convinced that something is going to help. When 'debating' here we do so for the education of thousands of readers including ourselves.
Ed

Re: hips being out of balance causing PF

Robert J. Sanfilippo, DC, CCSP, ART on 4/23/05 at 21:55 (173616)

Hello Ed:

Active Release Techniques is a very effective soft tissue mobilization technique that utilizes active movements to 'break up' fibrotic tissue(scar tissue). Fibrotic tissue inherently can cause pain itself but it generally alters the function of a structure like a muscle, tendon, ligament, or fascia. These altered functions will perpetuate pain and biomechanical faults which can create more fibrotic tissue to be laid down. Fibrotic tissue can also entrap nerve roots which will cause neurological symptomotology. I do utilize ART for many of my cases but I look at it as one of many tools of my training. ART doesn't cure everything but it allows the practitioner to view a patient in a different way. ART is a great assessment tool because it helps you to understand the biomechanics of the body. I can fill up pages speaking about this technique so if you have specific questions I will be glad to answer them.

I can't speak for the originator of the technique, but Dr. Leahy is a very busy man. His technique is known throughout the world and he undergoes scrutiny everyday I'm sure. I wouldn't take it personally but he is involved in many endeavors. I welcome all reasonable questions regarding my techniques and I will answer them to the best of my abilities.

Thank you for your questions and allowing me to speak freely on your site. I look forward to hearing from all of you. Be well

Dr. Rob